mostraligabue
» » Locke: A Very Short Introduction

ePub Locke: A Very Short Introduction download

by John Dunn

ePub Locke: A Very Short Introduction download
Author:
John Dunn
ISBN13:
978-0192803948
ISBN:
0192803948
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford University Press; Updated edition (July 31, 2003)
Subcategory:
Philosophy
ePub file:
1841 kb
Fb2 file:
1696 kb
Other formats:
mbr azw lit doc
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
949

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). John Dunn is a Fellow of King's College and Professor of Political Theory at the University of Cambridge.

Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).

Locke: A Very Short Introduction. 123 Pages · 2003 · . 5 MB · 857 Downloads ·English. It was fairly interesting to read and was very. If you want to become full, let yourself be empty. Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions). 158 Pages·2003·971 KB·4,048 Downloads·New!, Continental, communitarian traditions: Adorno, Habermas, MacIntyre, Strauss, etc. True, Miller has very little. Plato: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions).

A Very Short Introduction. The case which I wish to put in this book is very different. Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP. Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It is that we should see Locke instead as a tragic thinker, who understood in advance some of the deep contradictions in the modern conception of human reason, and so saw rather clearly some of the tragedy of our own lives which we still see very dimly indeed. Very Short Introductions). In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived a John Locke (1632-1704) one of the greatest English philosophers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, argued in his masterpiece, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, that our knowledge is founded in experience and reaches us principally through our senses; but its message has been curiously misunderstood.

In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived at his theory of knowledge, and how his exposition of the liberal .

In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived at his theory of knowledge, and how his exposition of the liberal values of toleration and responsible government formed the backbone of enlightened European thought of the eighteenth century. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area.

Locke: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions). The Empiricists: John Locke: An essay concerning human understanding, abridged by Richard Taylor. 903 Kb. The works of John Locke 5. John Locke. George Berkeley: A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge. Three dialogues between Hylas and Philonous, in opposition to sceptics and atheists. Locke John, Berkeley George, Hume David. Publication Date - July 2003

Locke: A Very Short Introduction. Publication Date - July 2003. In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived at his theory of knowledge, and how his exposition of the liberal values of toleration and responsible government formed the backbone of enlightened European thought of the eighteenth century.

Very Short Introductions (VSI) are a book series published by the Oxford University Press (OUP). The books are concise introductions to particular subjects, intended for a general audience but written by experts. Most are under 200 pages long. While authors may present personal viewpoints, the books are meant to be "balanced and complete" as well as thought provoking.

Поиск книг BookFi BookFi - BookFinder. Download books for free. Locke: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions). The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (Murphy Institute Studies in Political Economy).

Sociology: A Very Short Introduction - By Steve Bruce from Oxford University Press Canada. Title: SociologyAuthor: Bruce, StevePublisher: Oxford Univ PrPublication Date: of Pages: Binding Type: PAPERBACKLibrary of Congress: This has been on my bedside table for a while. Sociology: A Very Short Introduction by Steve Bruce.

John Locke (1632-1704) one of the greatest English philosophers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth century, argued in his masterpiece, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, that our knowledge is founded in experience and reaches us principally through our senses; but its message has been curiously misunderstood. In this book John Dunn shows how Locke arrived at his theory of knowledge, and how his exposition of the liberal values of toleration and responsible government formed the backbone of enlightened European thought of the eighteenth century.
  • Earlier I had written a negative review of this book, apparently from a superficial reading. Having now had a chance to reread it, I have found it extremely helpful and have rewritten this review. Not only does Dunn present a comprehensive outline of Locke's complex and often difficult writings -- difficult as Dunn stresses -- because so many of them depend on a view of Christianity and morality that seems tenuous to us today; but Dunn as well presents Locke's views in their historical settings and in Locke's own reaction to the significant social, political and scientific developments in England and the Continent at that time.

    As a student of American education I would recommend this book highly in order to grasp the character of Colonial, early national education, and the origins of public education in the 1830s and 1840s. Then, quite unlike today, education was centrally about character building. This had been true in Puritan Massachusetts, and throughout, whether in Franklin's "Poor Richard's Almanac," or in Jefferson's views on civic education, or in Horace Mann's vision of the necessity of state-controlled public schooling. Locke's thinking influenced all of this. To Horace Mann, Locke's "Thoughts on Education" was "by far better than any thing which had ever been written" on this topic, as Mann expert Bob Taylor underlines. Its central element was to teach students how to behave decently in order to preserve what was perceived as a threatened, in the 1840s, if not, as earlier in the 1780s, a fragile, republic.

    Dunn's review of Locke brings one convincingly into the thinking of this era albeit a century or more later than Locke's own.

  • Locke was a hugely important thinker, and his work was very influential, in fact dominant, in the early stage of the Enlightenment. He was a particularly strong influence on Voltaire and Rousseau, and his arguments on individual liberty were later to guide the American Founding Fathers. It is difficult to overrate his importance as one of the founders of modern philosophy. It is even more difficult to gain any insight into this from reading Dunn's book.

    The problem is that Dunn cannot write. He may well have a thorough understanding of Locke's work, but he is not letting on. This does not matter so much in the early part of the book, which deals with Locke's biography, but in the latter part, dealing with the philosophy, Locke's thought is rendered entirely opaque by Dunn's prose. It is difficult to pinpoint exactly what is at fault. The structure and meaning of individual sentences are sound enough, but they are assembled into paragraphs that don't actually tell us much. For example, we learn that Locke's proof of the existence of God would not impress many modern readers, but we are not told what that proof is. The blurb on the cover tells us that Locke's message has been 'curiously misunderstood', but the book itself does not explain how or why.

    After forcing my way through this book, I spent an hour or so on the Internet and learned far more about the subject. I recommend you do the same.

  • I generally like the "Very short introduction" series. However, I didn't find Dunn's take on Locke particularly helpful. Reeve's example about the failure to explain the "failed" proof for God's existence could be applied to many places. Similar examples can be found elsewhere. I remember Dunn saying that Locke's theory of knowledge "obviously" influenced Berkeley and Hume, without explaining in what way(s). Also, even if dealing with a subject or person I am not in much agreement with much, I like when the writers of the "Introduction" books generally endorse the thought of the subject they are covering. In Dunn's case, he seemed to always want to point out how utterly unconvincing he found most of Locke's positions, and how they are largely irrelevant to contemporary enquiry (even if he did stress that we are "all the products of his failure")

  • Very good introduction to a very complex set of intellectual issues - religious, moral, political & epistemological. These are foundational for English and American political philosophy and cultural and social evolution in the C18th and beyond.

    And Yes, Dunn's writing is fine, but you do need some background understanding of the political and intellectual worlds of the C17th.

  • There is something about the way this VSI book is written that makes it somewhat of a burden to get through. The subject matter can at times be challenging, but I think it has more to do with the writing style. Although the pages are short, there are a good number of page long paragraphs - never a good thing to encourage understanding and comprehension - unless the paragraphs are written exceedingly well. There is too much time spent on the context of Locke's thought; i.e. on the historical and reactionary aspects of his philosophy. For one of the greatest thinkers ever in Western civilization, I think more time could have been spent on the nuances and implications of his thought and less on some of the historical and contextual background. Not that it is not important, but for a volume of this length, the former merited more development. There is enough here to get the gist of Locke's thinking, but it can get lost in the other material.

  • Admittedly Dunn is not an easy read, but then who said intellectual history was always easy. Dunn is the author of one of the most important and subtle books on Locke, The Political Thought of John Locke. It is also very expensive and much more difficult a read than this introduction. It was part of the great reappraisal of Locke after the Laslett edition and a masterpiece of the Cambridge contextual school of intellectual history perhaps most associated with Quentin Skinner. These texts are difficult because they don't give simplistic usable history; rather, they try to understand what the authors were actually doing in the text. If this is not your cup of tea, then certainly forget this book. If you're interested in profound scholarship on a budget, this just might be the ticket. Fantastic book.