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ePub How Society Makes Itself: The Evolution of Political and Economic Institutions download

by Howard J Sherman

ePub How Society Makes Itself: The Evolution of Political and Economic Institutions download
Author:
Howard J Sherman
ISBN13:
978-0765616517
ISBN:
0765616513
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (September 1, 2005)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1834 kb
Fb2 file:
1270 kb
Other formats:
azw mbr lit lrf
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
345

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This book picks up where Karl Polanyi's study of economic and political change left of. Principles of Macroeconomics by Howard J. Sherman and Michael A. Meeropol differs from other texts in that this book stresses far more the inherent instability of the macro-economy. The details of the business cycle come early and are integrated throughout the core of usual macro topics (C, I, G, X). The book puts inflation into its proper perspective by recognizing that unemployment is the much greater threat to the economic well being of the vast majority of the people.

Social evolution Social institutions History Social history Economic history. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book How society makes itself : the evolution of political and economic institutions, Howard J. Sherman.

How society makes itself. the evolution of political and economic institutions. by Howard J. Published 2006 by . HM. The Physical Object. Sharpe in Armonk, NY. Written in English.

In a highly readable text, Howard Sherman explains the interconnections of ideas and economic forces, and traces the evolution of social and economic institutions from primitive times to the present. Sherman focuses on the myth of "inevitable progress" in technology, and argues that it progresses only when social and economic institutions and dominant ideas encourage it to improve.

This radical account of the evolution of political, social, and economic institutions weaves together strands of anthropology, sociology, political science, history, and economics. In a highly readable text, Howard Sherman explains the interconnections of ideas and economic forces, and traces the evolution of social and economic institutions from primitive times to the present. Sherman focuses on the myth of "inevitable progress" in technology, and argues that it progresses only when social and economic institutions and dominant ideas encourage it to improve. He shows that throughout history technology, as a part of the economic forces, ebbs and flows to create or undermine existing economic institutions.
  • Unlike some books on economics and politics, Sherman makes his points concisely and persuasively without overly elaborating once he makes his points. Readers will enjoy reading as well as find themselves smarter after reading this book!

  • I picked up this book based on the title, I would like to know how society makes itself. My own musing led me to believe that economics is central to many of the choices societies make to define themselves, I hoped this book would help me understand history better, a kind of economic Toynbee. This book is largely a chronology of oppressors painted in a simplistic fashion. Passages such as this describing American slave holders are common, "The master and his friends often sat on the veranda drinking mint juleps, while the slaves did hard, agricultural labor or tedious domestic labor from sunrise until after sunset." Not surprisingly about the only sympathetic treatment of an economic system was that of the Soviet Union. If you are interested in a simplistic treatment of economic themes through history with a revisionist bias this may be the book for you. I was looking for a book twice as long, twice as critical and half as biased.