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ePub Reproducing Order: A Study of Police Patrol Work (Canadian Studies in Criminology) download

by Richard V. Ericson

ePub Reproducing Order: A Study of Police Patrol Work (Canadian Studies in Criminology) download
Author:
Richard V. Ericson
ISBN13:
978-0802064752
ISBN:
0802064752
Language:
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 2nd Revised ed. edition (March 1, 1982)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1266 kb
Fb2 file:
1471 kb
Other formats:
mbr doc azw lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
811

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Canadian Studies in Criminology, Volume 5. as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Richard V. Ericson.

The book involves a qualitative study of police patrol work in Canada. It is very detailed and well worth reading. I believe the author has also published a similar book on detective work which I am now interested in reading. I am also interested in reading books that contain recent studies of police patrol work.

Professor Ericson and his colleagues followed the work of patrol officers in a large Canadian regional police force. From their direct observations comes a wealth of information, quantitatively assembled and qualitatively discussed, with insights into the nature of policing. This book reveals that the police are not mere 'referees' of our legal lives, blowing the whistle on our infractions.

Published by: University of Toronto Press. Book Description: The author's conclusions about the nature of policing and his discussion of the implications of proposals for reform of police, will generate better-informed deliberation in political and public decision-making and in the general study of sociological theory. eISBN: 978-1-4426-7924-5.

Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Loader, Ian. and Walker, Neil (2001), ‘Policing as a Public Good: Reconstituting the Connections between Policing and the State’, Theoretical Criminology, 5: 9–35. Doyle, Aaron (2003) Arresting Images: Crime and Policing in Front of the Television Camera. Toronto: University of Toronto Press

J. Chan and R. Ericson, Decarceration and the Economy of Penal Reform, Toronto: Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto, 1981.

J. Brodeur, ‘Policing: Beyond 1984’, Canadian Journal of Sociology 9 (1984), pp. 195–207,204.

Ericson, Richard Victor. Published in association with the Centre of Criminology, University of Toronto, by University of Toronto Press. 0802055699, 0802064752. This item appears on. List

However, very little has been done in a multidisciplinary approach to media and police specifically to the relation between the two parties in Malaysia.

Richard Victor Ericson. However, very little has been done in a multidisciplinary approach to media and police specifically to the relation between the two parties in Malaysia. Reference: Bridging the Gap: Exploring Police-Media Relations in Malaysia. Visualizing Deviance: A Study of News Organization.

By Richard V. Erickson. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1982. Wesley G. Skogan (a1). Northwestern University.

This book reveals that the police are not mere 'referees' of our legal lives, blowing the whistle on our infractions. They are censors of certain types of possibly wrong actions. Richard Ericson and Kevin Haggerty contend that the police have become information brokers to institutions, such as insurance companies and health and welfare organizations whose operations are based on a knowledge of risk. These institutions influence the ways in which police officers think and act.

Professor Ericson and his colleagues followed the work of patrol officers in a large Canadian regional police force. From their direct observations comes a wealth of information, quantitatively assembled and qualitatively discussed, with insights into the nature of policing.

This book reveals that the police are not mere 'referees' of our legal lives, blowing the whistle on our infractions. They are censors of certain types of possibly wrong actions. They are selective in their invocation of criminal law and use the law artfully to restore settings to orderliness.

Ericson emphasizes the routine manner in which the patrol officer intervenes and gains compliance fron the citizenry. He demonstrates that when the criminal process is invoked, the police maintain fundamental control over the court outcome.

Using these findings, he addresses basic questions about the role of police in relation to crime and how it is produced, literally, by the patrol officer. Crime is also seen as the primary basis of police legitimacy, which in turn enables the police to engage in broad surveillance and information-gathering.

The author's conclusions about the nature of policing and his discussion of the implications of proposals for reform of police, will generate better-informed deliberation in political and public decision-making and in the general study of sociological theory.