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ePub The first Bourbon: Henri IV,: King of France and Navarre download

by Desmond Seward

ePub The first Bourbon: Henri IV,: King of France and Navarre download
Author:
Desmond Seward
ISBN13:
978-0094572607
ISBN:
0094572607
Language:
Publisher:
Constable (1971)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1946 kb
Fb2 file:
1774 kb
Other formats:
lrf docx lit azw
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
782

They have occupied the thrones of France and Navarre, of Spain, of the two Sicilies, of Parma and Piacenza, and of Lucca.

They have occupied the thrones of France and Navarre, of Spain, of the two Sicilies, of Parma and Piacenza, and of Lucca.

The First Bourbon book. Desmond Seward is a British popular historian and the author of many books about in Britain and France in the late Middle Ages. Books by Desmond Seward.

The founder of the Bourbon dynasty, Henry IV, who ruled France from 1589 to 1610, is the most romantic of French kings. Very different from his grandson Louis XIV, he was a hard-fighting, hard swearing Southerner, who fought over 200 battles and had 60 (recorded) mistresses After surviving his predecessor's murderous court, he rebuilt a France ruined by thirty years of war between Catholics and Protestants, enabling her to become the most powerful country in Europe

Desmond Seward (born 22 May 1935, Paris) is a British popular historian and the author of many books, including biographies of Henry IV of France, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Marie Antoinette.

Desmond Seward (born 22 May 1935, Paris) is a British popular historian and the author of many books, including biographies of Henry IV of France, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Marie Antoinette, Empress Eugénie and Napoleon's family. He specialises in Britain and France in the late Middle Ages.

The Bourbon Kings of France Paperback. Desmond Seward was born in Paris and educated at Ampleforth and St Catharine's College, Cambridge. Henry IV was a person ahead of the times but his people was too far behind.

As Seward points out, Henri IV is probably the best-beloved king among the French themselves; he compares him .

As Seward points out, Henri IV is probably the best-beloved king among the French themselves; he compares him to Charles II of England, which is appropriate in some biographical particulars, but surely, as this study shows, Henri was a man of greater character and greater contributions to the commonwealth. Very different from his grandson Louis XIV, he was a hard-fighting, hard swearing Southerner, who fought over 200 battles and had 60 (recorded) mistresses After surviving his predecessor's murderous court, he rebuilt a France ruined by thirty years of war between Catholics and Protestants, enabling her to become the most powerful country in Europe.

Henry IV, 1553–1610, king of France (1589–1610) and, as Henry III, of Navarre (1572–1610), son of Antoine de Bourbon and Jeanne d'Albret; first of the Bourbon kings of France. Raised as a Protestant, he was recognized (1569) by the Huguenot leader Gaspard de Coligny as the nominal head of the Huguenots. As a result of the temporary reconciliation (1570) between the Huguenots and the crown, Henry was betrothed to Margaret of Valois, sister of King Charles IX. A few days after his marriage (Aug. 18, 1572) the massacre of the Huguenots (see Saint Bartholomew's Day, massacre.

  • Seward's biography of this remarkable man is engaging and well-written. He does a nice job of conveying Henry's personality and how it enabled him to reconcile former enemies and lead people affiliated with different factions. Seward also explains why Henry was a strong fighter and respected by his troops, but not a particularly good strategist. I also appreciated his point that King Henry has to be understood not as an innovator but as a man of his time--a man formed by Renaissance and late medieval ideals.

    Because this is a popular, and not academic, history, I understand why Seward didn't go into exhaustive detail about how Henry and Rosny, over approximately 10 years, rebuilt an economy devastated by 30 years of civil war, but I still found his explanation glib. Pre-Revolution France's economy was complex, and there were multiple opportunities for corruption. But Seward simply says that Rosny cut down on the corruption--thereby restoring the Treasury--without explaining how that was done.

    One thing I found very frustrating was Seward's liberal use of French quotes without translation. Sometimes he would provide a paraphrased translation, but, at other times, he simply left the quotes untranslated. This is a history written for English speakers, and it is irritating and disruptive to have to look up quotes on Google translate to figure out what they mean. If there is no way to properly translate a quote, then don't use the quote and try to find another way to make your point. Or, if the quote is absolutely necessary, acknowledge that there is no good translation but give the intended sense.

    I also had some concerns regarding Seward's characterization of certain women in Henry's life. It's not surprising that Seward sympathizes with Henry--I expect that's true of most biographers--but his treatment of certain women suggests that he identifies too closely with him. Seward is dismissive of Marie de Medici's (Henry's queen) objections to Henry's insistence that she raise their children alongside the children of his various mistresses and his insistence that his main mistress, Henriette, be accorded a place among Marie's ladies and a prime place in court (describing her as stupid and, essentially, petty). Seward doesn't stop to consider what it might have been like for a foreigner to come into France as queen, be confronted with her husband's mistresses and various illegitimate children, and be expected to accept that women and her children. Yes, this was Renaissance France, and women didn't have many rights and were expected to put up with certain things, but that doesn't mean that they did not feel the indignity, nor that they didn't have legitimate grievances. He also ascribes Henriette's ambition to be queen as being akin to being a gold-digger. Clearly, she was not a scrupulous woman, but why is it morally questionable that she wanted to be Henry's wife and queen if he expected her to sleep with him and give him children (particularly as he was unmarried at the time)? Yes, most royalty of that time did not marry their subjects for various political and foreign policy reasons, but it's not a sign of venality that a subject would seek marriage.

  • It sets forth the history of the war between the Huguenots and the Catholics in a concise and interesting book. I was always interested in this almost forgotten French king who saved France from itself and wanted to know more about him. This book did the job for me.It is well written, well paced and interesting.

  • I didn't know this book was self-published and probably wouldn't have bought this had I known. I think editorial oversight is a benefit for most books.
    The author knows his subject but had trouble organizing the material especially in writing about Henri's early life and his coverage of France's religious wars. He was much more certain and in control covering the subject's kingship,

  • Still have half to go. But I'm finding this story very interesting. Religion and politics the worst of both worlds with a need to conform. Henry IV was a person ahead of the times but his people was too far behind. Good book.....

  • Not just about Henry IV but also an overview of the continent during the time of his reign and the struggle to get there. Gives you a good sense of his personality - he wasn't called the Vert Galant for nothing!

  • Good background of Henry IV. Enjoyed that. Some of the side stories were of less interest (to me).

  • wonderful recreation of historical events!

  • It made me want to continue reading the next King of France.