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ePub Moneybags Must Be So Lucky: On the Literary Structure of Capital (On the Literary Structure of Capitalist Writings) download

by Robert P. Wolff

ePub Moneybags Must Be So Lucky: On the Literary Structure of Capital (On the Literary Structure of Capitalist Writings) download
Author:
Robert P. Wolff
ISBN13:
978-0870236167
ISBN:
0870236164
Language:
Publisher:
University of Massachusetts Press (March 28, 1988)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1486 kb
Fb2 file:
1320 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.2
Votes:
269

In their present form, they constitute the second of what will eventually be a trio of books devoted to a reinterpretation of Marx’s great work.

In this book, Robert Paul Wolff dispels. Writing in a lively, often satirical, sometimes comical style that echoes Marx's own use o. .

Home Browse Books Book details, Moneybags Must Be So Lucky: On the .

Home Browse Books Book details, Moneybags Must Be So Lucky: On the Literary. By Robert Paul Wolff.

Oct 24, 2012 Sara-Maria Sorentino rated it liked it. Shelves: marx-hegel. better to read nicole pepperell's work on marx's methodology.

University of Massachusetts Press.

Are you sure you want to remove Moneybags must be so lucky from your list? . Published 1988 by University of Massachusetts Press in Amherst.

Are you sure you want to remove Moneybags must be so lucky from your list? Moneybags must be so lucky. Karl Marx (1818-1883). There's no description for this book yet.

In this book Robert Paul Wolff dispels much of the mystery surrounding Karl Marx's "Capital" by providing literary-philosophica analysis of the text and of Marx's intentions. The book solves lasting puzzles about "Capital, such as why it lacks proper scientific sobriety and why it speaks on many levels.
  • "Moneybags Must Be So Lucky" is the arresting title of a series of lectures held by University of Massachusetts at Amherst philosopher Robert Paul Wolff. They form the content of the Romanell-Phi Beta Kappa lectures held in 1984-1985 at that institution, and deal with the question of irony and style in Marx's "Capital". Unlike the famous work by S.S. Prawer on literary references in Marx's work, Wolff is not primarily concerned with literature or allusions in the book, but rather with the purely stylistic tropes applied, in particular those of the first chapters of Volume 1. The lectures first take us through a digression on the philosophical notions of essence and appearance, from Plato to Hegel, and the notion of Socratic irony, where (in a somewhat controversial reading) he interprets Socrates as dealing with irony at a level which implicates the speaker in the subject of irony. Another trope introduced is the notion of inversion, where some abstraction of real things becomes reified to such a degree that the concrete appears to be the manifestation of the abstract, instead of the other way round. Wolff then shows how these concepts are combined in Marx's dealing with the nature of value in "Capital", in particular the opposition between the appearance of exchange, money, price and so forth, and their underlying realities in production and value. The author here makes an interesting contrast with the similar inversion manoeuvre found in Plato's famous allegory of the cave: there, the appearance is dark and irrational, and the reality is bright and rational. For Marx, however, capitalism appears to be the realm of "liberty, equality, property and Bentham", but the reality is the dark abode of production, where none may gain admission except on business.

    A number of quotations from the text may serve to explain its conclusions on Marx's use of language in "Capital", which I think are well-founded and insightful. Wolff notes: "to talk about this world (...) Marx's discourse must permit him to represent the quantitative relationships that actually obtain in capitalist production and exchange.(...) Furthermore, [it] must permit critics like Marx to articulate the structure of mystification that conceals the exploitative and self-destructive character of capitalism. (...) In addition, (...) the language of political economy must serve to implicate the speaker in the very patterns of mystification that are being exposed. (...) And finally, this language cannot be entirely self-contained in the scope of its theoretical applicability. It must offer resources for an eventual transcendence of the mystifications of the capitalist market". This is well said, and Wolff has, himself using various jokes and forms of stylistic wit in the process, in this way made the most inaccessible part of Capital - the endless digressions on linens and coats and the nature of value in Ch. 1, 2, and 6 - easier to understand and more pleasant reading.

  • Wolff's book is worth the price just for the unpacking of the difference between being a lapsed-Catholic atheist and being a never-been-a-believer atheist. Beyond that, Wolff demonstrates that Marx's seemingly obscure, convoluted writing - especially in the first chapter of Capital - serves a deeper purpose. Marx uses satire to uncover the absurdity of "bourgeois economists" and the contradictory nature of their thought. A very readable work that will make anyone's reading of Marx not only more enjoyable, but more valuable, too.

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