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ePub The People's Right To Know: Media, Democracy, and the Information Highway (LEA Telecommunications Series) download

by Frederick Williams,John V. Pavlik

ePub The People's Right To Know: Media, Democracy, and the Information Highway (LEA Telecommunications Series) download
Author:
Frederick Williams,John V. Pavlik
ISBN13:
978-0805814903
ISBN:
0805814906
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (November 1, 1993)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1299 kb
Fb2 file:
1514 kb
Other formats:
txt doc mbr lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
191

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. This important volume presents the pros and cons of a national service that will meet the information needs and wants of all people.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The People's Right to Know: Media, Democracy, and the Information Highway as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This book offers some compelling discussions, information, and resources for the trip. It discusses the hows and whys of electronic information services. What will these changes do to existing services in the community?

Williams, Frederick, and John V. Pavlik, Eds. (1994). The People's Right to Know: Media, Democracy, and the Information Highway. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers. This book offers some compelling discussions, information, and resources for the trip. What will these changes do to existing services in the community? Who will benefit most? What role will government have in this development? What technologies, hardware, and software are necessary to make the change? These are just a few of the topics addressed.

by Frederick Williams First published November 1st 1993. The People's Right to Know: Media, Democracy, and the Information Highway (Paperback). Published December 13th 1993 by Routledge. Paperback, 272 pages.

Frederick Williams, John V. Pavlik . eBook Rental from £1. 0. Those who wish to know more about the information highway will find that this book fits their needs; those who wish to teach students the importance of this issue will find it a useful tool.

This important volume presents the pros and cons of a national service that will meet the information needs and wants of all people. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

By: Frederick Williams. Publisher: Routledge. Print ISBN: 9780805814903, 0805814906.

Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9781136689925, 1136689923. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780805814903, 0805814906. By: Frederick Williams.

Williams, Frederick and John V. Pavlik, ed (1994). McChesney, Robert W. and Nichols, John (2002) Our Media, Not theirs: The Democratic Struggle Against Corporate Media. New York : Seven Stories. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. pp. 153. ISBN 0805814914. The Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom.

book below: (C) 2016-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Williams, Frederick/Pavlik, John V (Hrsg. Media Democracy and the Information Highway. (1994): The Peoples Right to Know. Yalof, Davic . Dautrich, Kenneth (2002): The First Amendment and the Media in the Court of Public Opinion. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

The people's right to know: Media, democracy, and the information highway. F Williams, JV Pavlik. Framing public life: Perspectives on media and our understanding of th. 2001. Ubiquidade: O 7. º princípio do jornalismo na era digital.

This important volume presents the pros and cons of a national service that will meet the information needs and wants of all people. In the preface, Everette E. Dennis, Executive Director of The Freedom Forum Media Studies Center, asks, "What will a true information highway -- where most citizens enjoy a wide range of information services on demand -- do to local communities, government, and business entities, other units of society and democracy itself?" It is no longer a question of whether a vastly expanded "information highway" will be built in America. Telephone and cable companies have already inaugurated their plans, and government will most likely incorporate such plans into the economic development policy of the late 1990s. The key questions remaining are: Who will pay for it? and Whom exactly will it serve? The People's Right to Know suggests that serving the everyday citizen should be the main objective of any national initiatives in this area. It counsels that evolving electronic services are new communications media that should be deployed with a main focus on the public's needs, interests, and desires. If advances in the nation's public telephone network will make information services as easy to use as ordinary voice calls, or newspapers promise vast new electronic services awaiting their readers, more attention must also be devoted to the information needs and wants of everyday citizens. In our increasingly multicultural and technology-driven society, enormous inequities exist across America's socioeconomic classes regarding access to information critical to everyday life. If an information highway is to be effective, we need to ensure that all Americans have access to it; its design must start with the everyday citizen. This powerful new medium at our disposal must consider policy that includes attempts to close the information gap among our citizens. It must ensure equal access to data regarding job, education, and health information services; legal information on such topics as immigration; and transactional services that offer assistance on such routine but time-consuming tasks as renewing a driver's license or registering to vote. Media and telecommunications professionals, communication scholars, and policymakers, including two former chairmen of the Federal Communications Commission, provide insights and pointed commentary on the nature and shape of an information highway designed as a new public medium aimed at serving a wide range of public needs. Their work should improve our basis for deciding if there are means by which an enhanced public telecommunications network can benefit the everyday working American.