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ePub Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795 (Harvard Historical Monographs) download

by Philip Dawson

ePub Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795 (Harvard Historical Monographs) download
Author:
Philip Dawson
ISBN13:
978-0674719606
ISBN:
0674719603
Language:
Publisher:
Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (January 1, 1972)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1662 kb
Fb2 file:
1679 kb
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4.1
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659

Harvard Historical Monographs 66. Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France .

Harvard Historical Monographs 66. Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795. By the end of 1789, the author concludes, most of the magistrates came to accept revolutionary change because alternative courses of action had been made more unacceptable to them. It was their support that helped to make possible the revolutionary process itself. They were not the leaders of the revolutionary bourgeoisie.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France . Place of Publication. Politics: General & Reference. Historical Monograph.

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Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789–1795. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 . Harvard University Press. Enragés" in Critical Dictionary of the French Revolution. p. 305. ISBN 978-0-674-71960-6. Ian Davidson – The French Revolution – From Enlightenment to Tyranny – Profile Books Ltd – London, 2016. 339. ISBN 9780674177284. "Revolution Devours Its Own-Le Vieux Cordelier".

Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795. Paul Lucas, "Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795. Philip Dawson," The Journal of Modern History 46, no. 1 (Ma. 1974): 128-130.

Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795 is a study of the judges and king's attorneys in the 373 mid-level royal courts. The book is part of a body of historical writing on the relations between social identity and political comportment in the French revolution. I studied a clearly defined occupation group whose status was at the boundary between the nobility and the Third Estate. Some magistrates were nobles, but most were local notables, part of the traditional bourgeoisie. A few became political leaders during the revolution

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as Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789–95, part of its historical monograph series

The dissertation was published in 1971 by Harvard University Press as Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789–95, part of its historical monograph series. Dawson's thesis benefited substantially from the knowledge that be had gained from critiquing two volumes produced by his father, A History of Lay Judges (1960) and The Oracles of the Law (1968). Dawson began his professional career when be presented a paper on the bourgeoisie de robe in 1789 at the 1963 meeting of the society for French Historical Studies held at Harvard.

Author: Provincial Magistrates and Revolutionary Politics in France, 1789-1795, 1972. Dawson, Philip was born on November 28, 1928 in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. Son of John Philip and Emma Van Nostrand (McDonald) Dawson. Contributor articles to professional journals. Bachelor, University of Michigan, 1950; Master of Arts, University of Michigan, 1951; Doctor of Philosophy, Harvard University, 1961.

Harvard historical monographs. Other books in this series. Church, Politics, and Society in Spain, 1750-1874. By (author) Crane Brinton.

It is commonly agreed that the history of France at the end of the eighteenth century was influenced powerfully, at times decisively, by collective interests and group actions. Yet, as Philip Dawson shows, this consensus has been the foundation of endless scholarly argument over the purposes of group actions and their effects on economic, political, and intellectual life, the accuracy of facts reported, the validity of different methods of analysis, and the significance of the whole topic for previous and subsequent human experience. In probing these questions, this monograph contributes research findings to the historical controversy over the political motives and conduct of the upper bourgeoisie during the French Revolution.

Chosen for study is a well-defined occupational group near the pinnacle of the bourgeoisie, the 2700 judicial officeholders in the bailliages and sénéchaussées--royal courts from which appeals were taken to the parlements. These lower-court magistrates were generally well-to-do and esteemed personages in the provincial bourgeoisie, who could potentially be drawn to either side in a political struggle between nobility and bourgeoisie. They constituted more than 20 percent of the bourgeois representation in the Estates General of 1789. Revolutionary legislation abolished their offices, but many of them remained active in politics even under the revolutionary republic.

Dawson makes use of a variety of manuscript materials pertinent to the magistrates as he treats their activities as members of corporate groups before 1790 and follows many of them as individuals through the revolutionary years to 1795. In part, the book is based on biographical data relating to 230 magistrates--all who were in office in the provinces of Burgundy and Poitou at the outbreak of the revolution.

By the end of 1789, the author concludes, most of the magistrates came to accept revolutionary change because alternative courses of action had been made more unacceptable to them. It was their support that helped to make possible the revolutionary process itself. "They were not the leaders of the revolutionary bourgeoisie. Before 1789, they had been in the highest rank of the bourgeoisie and they remained a notable part of it, but most of them had come to support revolution hesitantly, cautiously, with moderation and many a backward glance."