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by Tariq Ali,Andrew J. Bacevich,Dominique Bari,Rodric Braithwaite,Nick Turse

ePub The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan download
Author:
Tariq Ali,Andrew J. Bacevich,Dominique Bari,Rodric Braithwaite,Nick Turse
ISBN13:
978-1844674510
ISBN:
1844674517
Language:
Publisher:
Verso (September 20, 2010)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1166 kb
Fb2 file:
1289 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
453

He is the author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday and has written for the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The Nation, Le Monde Diplomatique, In These Times and the Village Voice. Tariq Ali is a writer and filmmaker.

Start by marking The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan as Want to. .

Start by marking The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Known as the graveyard of empires, Afghanistan has now been singled out as Obama’s just war, the destination for an additional thirty thousand US troops in an effort to shore up an increasingly desperate occupation.

See if your friends have read any of Dominique Bari's books. Andrew J. Bacevich (Contributor). Dominique Bari’s Followers (2). Dominique Bari. Dominique Bari’s books. Chine: La Grande Mutation.

Nick Turse brings together a range of leading analysts-including Andrew Bacevich, Anand Gopal, Chalmers Johnson and Ann .

Nick Turse brings together a range of leading analysts-including Andrew Bacevich, Anand Gopal, Chalmers Johnson and Ann Jones-to analyze America's real motives and likely prospects. Through on-the-spot reporting, clear-headed analysis and historical comparisons with Afghanistan's previous occupiers-Britain and the Soviet Union, who also argued that they were fighting a just and winnable war-The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan carefully examines the current US strategy and offers sobering conclusions.

Published by Verso Books. The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan. From the publisher: Known as the graveyard of empires, Afghanistan has now been singled out as Obama’s just war,A the destination for an additional thirty thousand US troops in an effort to shore up an increasingly desperate occupation. Nick Turse brings together a range of leading analysts-including Andrew Bacevich, Anand Gopal, Chalmers Johnson and Ann Jones-to analyze America’s real motives and likely prospects.

Afgansty is by Rodric Braithwaite, a contributor to Verso's The Case for Withdrawal from Afghanistan. A Long Goodbye is by Artemy Kalinovsky. Rodric Braithwaite, British ambassador to Moscow between 1988 and 1992, was in Russia when Soviet troops crossed the Oxus into Afghanistan in 1979.

Sir Rodric Quentin Braithwaite, GCMG (born 17 May 1932) is a British diplomat and author. Braithwaite was educated at Bedales School and Christ's College, Cambridge. After his military service, he joined HM Diplomatic Service in 1955. His diplomatic career included posts in Indonesia, Italy, Poland, the Soviet Union, and a number of positions at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Rodric Braithwaite AFGANTSY The Russians in Afghanistan 1979–89 As she lay dying Jill said to me, with all her customary firmness, that I was not even to think of following her until I had finished this book. It is dedicated to her courageous and generous spirit. MAPS Map 1: Afghanistan, 1979–89Map 2: Kabul in 1980Map 3: Storming the PalaceMap 4: The Pandsher ValleyAUTHOR’S NOTE Afganets (plural: Afgan. As she lay dying Jill said to me, with all her customary firmness, that I was not even to think of following her until I had finished this book.

View the profiles of people named Rodric Braithwaite. People named Rodric Braithwaite.

Earlier peace dialogues have focused on two main planks: the withdrawal of Western troops and the Taliban’s pledge to deny any safe haven to terrorist groups in Afghanistan. We’re not looking for a withdrawal agreement. On Thursday, Zalmay Khalilzad, the veteran American diplomat leading the negotiations with the Taliban, sought to make clear that the United States was not just looking for an exit ramp from the war. We’re not cutting and running, Mr. Khalilzad said in a taped video statement to a Georgetown University forum on ensuring that women and civil society are included in the peace talks.

Known as the graveyard of empires, Afghanistan has now been singled out as Obama’s “just war,” the destination for an additional thirty thousand US troops in an effort to shore up an increasingly desperate occupation. Nick Turse brings together a range of leading commentators, politicians, and military strategists to analyze America’s real motives and likely prospects. Through on-the-spot reporting, clear-headed analysis and historical comparisons with Afghanistan’s previous occupiers—Britain and the Soviet Union, who also argued that they were fighting a just and winnable war—The Case for Withdrawal From Afghanistan carefully examines the current US strategy and offers sobering conclusions. This timely and focused collection aims at the heart of Obama’s foreign policy and shows why it is so unlikely to succeed.
  • Award winning journalist and author of The Complex: How the Military Invades Our Everyday Lives Nick Turse is the editor of this collection of articles on the US/Nato occupation of Afghanistan published in 2010.

    Only 6 of the 22 articles deal explicitly with the ostensible purpose of this publication: the issue of withdrawal. These make up some of the shorter pieces of this book and vary from the author of Raising my Voice Malalai Joya's impassioned plea that "No Nation Can Liberate Another" to the more hard headed "realist" analysis of former CIA station chief Graham Fuller ("Obama's Policies Make The Situation Worse").

    The rest of the articles cover a range of topics related to the war, the most notable of these come from Juan Cole with his brief look at the continuities in the history of foreign interventions, and Tariq Ali (author of the exceptional Clash of Fundamentalisms) who looks at aspects of the conflict thus far (2010) in the "Mirage of the Good War". Other articles explore the proliferation of U.S. base building in Afghanistan, the deteriorating plight of woman, the war profiteering going on within and without the country (including the Taliban who take a cut from massive amounts spent on trucking the supplies required to keep the U.S. soldier in theatre), the role of covert and private forces and the tendancy for the conflict to expand into Pakistan.

    Unfortunately these articles collectively do not form a coherent whole that will assist the reader in forming a comprehensive view of the War in Afghanistan from 2001 to the date of publication. Rather it provides, from a number of different and even differing voices, a variety of insights into specific parts of the conflict, and while these are by and large worth reading overall it remains a fine book rather than an exceptional one.

  • This useful book is in four parts: the wars for Afghanistan; the Karzai government's incompetence, corruption and the war on women; facts on the ground; and the case for withdrawal.

    Governments used to tell us the fate of the empire was at stake in every war. Now they tell us the fate of civilisation is at stake, or national security, or NATO. These exaggerations are a mirror image of the fundamentalists' claim that Islam's survival is at stake.

    Women had equal rights and education only between 1979 and 1989, under secular, Marxist rule. In 2008, President Karzai pardoned a bunch of thugs who had gang-raped a woman in front of witnesses. In 2009 he passed a family law worthy of the Taliban. In Afghanistan's constitution, no law may contravene Sharia law. The UN's Assistance Mission there sums up, "women are denied their most fundamental human rights".

    NATO forces commit war crimes, bomb civilians and torture prisoners, all in the name of `liberation'. Billions of dollars of `aid' go to the Northern Alliance, run by warlords and drug-runners. Karzai's younger brother, Ahmed Wali Karzai, is one of the richest drug barons in the country.

    There are now 400 NATO military bases in the country and $3 billion worth of base-building projects. There are still 50 US bases in Iraq. In both countries, NATO occupations promise only endless war, costing thousands of lives, civilian and military, and billions of dollars and pounds, all to set up secure bases for NATO's use of force against nearby countries.

  • One should read this book to understand why the situation in Afghanistan is a shambles. There are interesting views from both Afghans and Westerners, and put together in one book makes it a very interesting reading.

  • I believe Turse, like anyone else who wishes to voice their expert opinion on such SOF and CounterInsurgency strategies, should join the ranks and experience it first hand. The only way to become subject experts is to write excerpts directly from the field. This is an open invitation for those who are such Professional keyboard Commandos to actually step up to the plate and join the Warrior caste. See ya in Camp Margarita or Camp Mackall ;-)

  • Boring and dated.