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by J. C. D. Clark,Edmund Burke

ePub Reflections on the Revolution in France: A Critical Edition download
Author:
J. C. D. Clark,Edmund Burke
ISBN13:
978-0804739238
ISBN:
0804739234
Language:
Publisher:
Stanford University Press; 1 edition (February 1, 2002)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1424 kb
Fb2 file:
1503 kb
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4.7
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385

The French Revolution is a defining moment in world history, and usually it has been first approached by English-speaking readers through the picture painted of it by Edmund Burke

The French Revolution is a defining moment in world history, and usually it has been first approached by English-speaking readers through the picture painted of it by Edmund Burke. Reflections on the Revolution in France is a classic work in a range of fields from history through political science to literature, and securely holds its place among the canon of great books. Yet its meaning is still contested and often misunderstood, equally by those who wish to admire or to denigrate Burke for his present-day relevance. Cloth ISBN: 9780804739238 Paper ISBN: 9780804742054.

Pp. 446. £35; Paperback:£12.

Clark has also framed an explanation of the American Revolution as, in part, a "war of religion", triggered by the denominational .

Clark has also framed an explanation of the American Revolution as, in part, a "war of religion", triggered by the denominational conflicts still endemic at that time within the English-speaking North Atlantic world. Clark has frequently maintained that too often the 18th century has been interpreted teleologically in the light of the 19th; he sees his mission as an historian to explain the long 18th century in its own terms. Clark criticised Marxists such as Christopher Hill, Eric Hobsbawm and . Thompson for advancing what he argued was an incorrect interpretation.

My copy of Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France comes with a splendid introductory essay by Conor Cruise O’Brien, onetime academic, politician, journalist and writer

My copy of Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France comes with a splendid introductory essay by Conor Cruise O’Brien, onetime academic, politician, journalist and writer.

Clark is now primarily interested in the history of religion, and his chief achievement is the reintroduction of a religious dimension into the agendas formerly set by positivist, functionalist and reductionist historians. Our Shadowed Present: Modernism, Postmodernism and History (London: Atlantic Books, 2003).

Constitutional Society and Revolution Society. Documents Similar To Burke, Edmund. Reflections on the Revolution in France, Ed. J. C. D Clark. Burke afirma que concorda com os procedimentos anteriores do Revolution club, mas discorda com o fato de ter se imiscuido em assuntos externos sem o consentimento do governo ingls. Liberdade e Governo em abstrato. I flatter myself that I love a manly, moral, regulated liberty as well as any gentleman of that society, be he who he will; and perhaps I have given as good proofs of my attachment to that cause, in the whole course of my public conduct. I think I envy liberty as little as they do, to any other nation.

Burke and those who were with rrirrt felt that the New Englanders were . He knew far less of the social state of France than of the conditions of either France or America, and totally ignored the existence in France o. .

Burke and those who were with rrirrt felt that the New Englanders were fighting their battles and that the suppression of liberty there would have the same consequences at home. He knew far less of the social state of France than of the conditions of either France or America, and totally ignored the existence in France of the oppressive abuses that constituted the case of the French people against their government.

His best-known work is Reflections on the French Revolution (1790)

His best-known work is Reflections on the French Revolution (1790). Some other notable works are On Conciliation with the American Colonies (1775) and Impeachment of Warren Hastings (1788). Edmund Burke died in 1797. Библиографические данные. Reflections on the Revolution in France Hackett Classics.

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Reflections on the Revolution in France by.

This page contains details about the Nonfiction book Reflections on the Revolution in France by Edmund Burke published in 1790. This book is the 865th greatest Nonfiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. In the twentieth century, it much influenced conservative and classical liberal intellectuals, who re-cast Burke's Whig arguments as a critique of Communism and Socialist revolutionary programmes.

The French Revolution is a defining moment in world history, and usually it has been first approached by English-speaking readers through the picture painted of it by Edmund Burke. Reflections on the Revolution in France is a classic work in a range of fields from history through political science to literature, and securely holds its place among the canon of "great books." Yet its meaning is still contested and often misunderstood, equally by those who wish to admire or to denigrate Burke for his present-day relevance. This edition aims to locate Burke once again in his contemporary political and intellectual setting. Alone among recent versions, it reprints the text of the first edition of the Reflections, and shows how Burke amended it as his knowledge of the Revolution deepened. It is certain to become the standard edition for scholars and students alike. The editor's Introduction is much more extensive than that of any previous edition. It situates the Reflections in Burke's life and the development of his ideas, the history of English political thought, the debate about the French Revolution, and the debate the book itself inspired. But the Introduction is more than a compendium of information; it is a thoughtful, coherent interpretation of Burke and his book. The editor's notes are also fuller than those of any previous edition, glossing many literary and biblical allusions missed by previous editors. He also supplies an extended note on the text, a biographical guide, and a bibliography, helpfully presented in discursive form.
  • Love Edmund Burke. He was, I believe, one of the greatest writers and statesmen of his time. His command of the English language was superlative. He cannot be surpassed for eloquence. Anyone who has even a cursory interest in the French Revolution cannot ignore his writings. Burke stands like a great and majestic British Oak tree underneath whose strong and spreading branches you can find shade and take rest.
    Burke was fighting, in reality, proto-communism. He saw with prescient clarity where the Jacobin philosophies would lead. He sounded a clear warning about the dire and destructive consequences that the French Revolution would unleash.
    He immediately saw that the French Revolution was not at all what it ostensibly claimed to be —Liberty, Equality, Fraternity. It was instead a rebellion; a rebellion against authority-- any authority- all authority- in any form. The heralded “empire of light and reason” would bring forth a dark and dangerous ochlocracy.
    Of course, if you’re any student of history you will have heard of the debate between Burke and Thomas Paine. Although Paine does well in arguing his case- his points do have weight and merit, he cannot approach Burke in eloquence, beauty of language or power of metaphor.
    Burke will stand, as he has stood for over two hundred years, as a beacon and light over and against those who have claimed- and continue to claim- that only they know what’s best for mankind.

  • Burke championed the security of order over political freedom, particularly when brought about by revolution.

    Edmund Burke wrote his Reflections on the Revolution in France in 1790, at the very onset of the French Revolution. Burke saw in the events in France the dangers of Revolution and presciently foresaw some of the worst excesses likely as a result of the governmental breakdown. He was a politician as well as a philosopher and man of letters and had accumulated a lifetime of experience pertaining to the subtle interplay of how a government is organized. He had uppermost in his mind the benefits of living in safety and accumulating material goods which would be allowed by a well ordered society.

    This emphasis on order is both the strength and the downfall of Burke. To give the man his due, he had well considered criticism of the many inadequacies of the constitutional monarchy formed after the Estates General had been replaced by the National Assembly in 1789. This civil structure failed on many levels, stripping the executive of respect and power, thereby creating a situation in which the army would become disordered and eventually grab power itself through some young officer of ambition. They made a shambles of the financial system. Fair representation of the people in the government was non-existent. The National Assembly held up the ideal of the rights of man, but by their failure to provide order in which liberty and freedom could flourish, provided only for the worst excesses of Robespierre and Danton. "To make a government requires no great prudence. Settle the seat of power; teach obedience: and the work is done. To give freedom is still more easy. It is not necessary to guide; it only requires to let go of the rein. But to form a free government; that is, to temper together these opposite elements of liberty and restraint in one consistent work, requires much thought, deep reflection, a sagacious, powerful, and combining mind."(p. 208)

    History proved Burke right in the short term of turn of the century French politics. The slaughter, the toll in human misery and injustice which ensued in the last decade of the 18th century, after he published his Reflections in November of 1790, amply demonstrate the protection people often take for granted in a civil society which functions even merely adequately.

    Burke has a deep concern for human rights in a limited sense, that is, that a human is owed what is his due. This is based on freedom and justice more than equality. "If civil society be made for the advantage of man, all the advantages for which it is made become his right...They have a right to the fruits of their industry; and to the means of making their industry fruitful. They have a right to the acquisitions of their parents; to the nourishment and improvement of their offspring; to instruction in life, and to consolation in death. Whatever each man can separately do, without trespassing upon others, he has a right to do for himself...In this partnership all men have equal rights; but not to equal things. He that has but five shillings in the partnership, has as good a right to it, as he that has five hundred pounds has to his larger proportion."(p. 50)

    He saw government as a malleable instrument which could change to some degree to meet current needs. Completely replacing it with a new one, particularly one based on high ideas rather than on experience was sure to bring disaster. Burke was a champion of experience rather than idealism, particularly the Enlightenment ideas of thinkers such as Voltaire. Though the current system resulted from violence and injustice in the past, sudden change of this system would bring about greater injustice. Politics seeking perfection were doomed to failure and Burke thus argued for acceptance of the current imperfect, messy system which strikes a working balance between, good and evil, or many times, between two evils.

    The sense in which reverence for order is his downfall is in Burke's willingness to accept the current order, even to uphold and defend it, when it was clearly unjust, unfair, or just plain evil. At his worst, his hidebound aversion to change holds up his prejudice against Jews, his apology for slavery, his religious intolerance, his lack of concern for marked discrepancy between the wealthy and the poor.

  • What Edmund Burke tells us in 1790, is very applicable for today, in 2013. What ever your political leanings, Burke clearly, consisely, and through great prose, shows us the dangers when society allows mobocracy to rule, instead of the law ruling. Picking and choosing which laws must be followed is anathema to Burke's great thought.

    Laws and Constitutions must be held in exactness, or legally changed, lest anarchy arises from within.

    Burke's prose sings this very day. I found myself reading aloud on many occasions. This is a book that must you must take time and slowly read. I encourage reading many passages aloud to feel the true impact. I nod in humble agreement to everything Burke posits on. The weight of his words must be viewed as a wake-up call for all teetering domestic and political societies.