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ePub Seeing Through the Eighties: Television and Reaganism (Console-ing Passions) download

by Jane Feuer

ePub Seeing Through the Eighties: Television and Reaganism (Console-ing Passions) download
Author:
Jane Feuer
ISBN13:
978-0822316879
ISBN:
0822316870
Language:
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books; First Edition edition (October 26, 1995)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1926 kb
Fb2 file:
1747 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit azw mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
268

Seeing Through the Eighties is an important work in the study of television and American cultural history

Seeing Through the Eighties is an important work in the study of television and American cultural history. In it, Feuer examines specifics of shows from one of America's Golden Ages of TV - shows like Miami Vice, Moonlighting and thirtysomething (and others!) to reveal their modernist and postmodernist tendencies. She pits her examples from these shows against American happenings such as the rise of yuppie culture.

Seeing Through the Eighties book. In Seeing Through the Eighties, Jane Feuer critically examines this most aesthetically complex and politicall The 1980s saw the rise of Ronald Reagan and the New Right in American politics, the popularity of programs such as thirtysomething and Dynasty on network television, and the increasingly widespread use of VCRs, cable TV, and remote control in American living rooms.

Jane Feuer is Professor of film studies in the English and Communication Departments at the University of Pittsburgh, United States

Jane Feuer is Professor of film studies in the English and Communication Departments at the University of Pittsburgh, United States. She is a film and television studies scholar and one of the founders of Console-ing Passions, a biennial conference in feminism, television, video and new media. She is the author of The Hollywood Musical (London: BFI Publishing), Seeing Through the Eighties (Durham: Duke University Press) and MTM: Quality Television (London: BFI Publishing).

Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littfield. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time. Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern.

Автор: Jane Feuer Название: Seeing Through the Eighties: Television and Reaganism Издательство: Springer .

Автор: Jane Feuer Название: Seeing Through the Eighties: Television and Reaganism Издательство: Springer Классификация: Телевидение Культурные исследования ISBN: 0851705987 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780851705989 ISBN: 0-85170-598-7 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-0-85170-598-9 Обложка/Формат: Paperback Вес: . 3 к. Дополнительное описание: The made-for-TV "trauma drama": neoconservative nightmare or radical critique?; the yuppie spectator; yuppie envy and yuppie guilt: "LA Law" and "Thirtysomething"; art discourse in 1980s television: modernism as postmodernism; serial form, melodrama and R.

In Seeing Through the Eighties, Jane Feuer critically examines this most aesthetically .

In Seeing Through the Eighties, Jane Feuer critically examines this most aesthetically complex and politically significant period in the history of American television in the context of the prevailing conservative ideological climate.

Jane Feuer is Professor of film studies in the English and Communication . Seeing through the Eighties: Television and Reaganism.

Jane Feuer is Professor of film studies in the English and Communication Departments at the University of Pittsburgh, USA. She was a Fulbright Distinguished Professor at the University of Tubingen, Germany for the 2009-2010 academic year.

La collection Console-ing Passions au meilleur prix à la Fnac. Seeing Through the Eighties Television and Reaganism (ebook). Jane Feuer (Auteur), Lynn Spigel (Auteur)

La collection Console-ing Passions au meilleur prix à la Fnac. Plus de 19 Ebooks Console-ing Passions en stock neuf ou d'occasion. Jane Feuer (Auteur), Lynn Spigel (Auteur) Lire la suite.

The 1980s saw the rise of Ronald Reagan and the New Right in American politics, the popularity of programs such as thirtysomething and Dynasty on network television, and the increasingly widespread use of VCRs, cable TV, and remote control in American living rooms. In Seeing Through the Eighties, Jane Feuer critically examines this most aesthetically complex and politically significant period in the history of American television in the context of the prevailing conservative ideological climate. With wit, humor, and an undisguised appreciation of TV, she demonstrates the richness of this often-slighted medium as a source of significance for cultural criticism and delivers a compelling decade-defining analysis of our most recent past.With a cast of characters including Michael, Hope, Elliot, Nancy, Melissa, and Gary; Alexis, Krystle, Blake, and all the other Carringtons; not to mention Maddie and David; even Crockett and Tubbs, Feuer smoothly blends close readings of well-known programs and analysis of television’s commercial apparatus with a thorough-going theoretical perspective engaged with the work of Baudrillard, Fiske, and others. Her comparative look at Yuppie TV, Prime Time Soaps, and made-for-TV-movie Trauma Dramas reveals the contradictions and tensions at work in much prime-time programming and in the frustrations of the American popular consciousness. Seeing Through the Eighties also addresses the increased commodification of both the producers and consumers of television as a result of technological innovations and the introduction of new marketing techniques. Claiming a close relationship between television and the cultures that create and view it, Jane Feuer sees the eighties through televison while seeing through television in every sense of the word.
  • Seeing Through the Eighties is an important work in the study of television and American cultural history. In it, Feuer examines specifics of shows from one of America's Golden Ages of TV - shows like Miami Vice, Moonlighting and thirtysomething (and others!) to reveal their modernist and postmodernist tendencies. She pits her examples from these shows against American happenings such as the rise of yuppie culture. Proving that taping commercials can sometimes actually help rather than hinder the viewing experience, Feuer also looks at the ads that were run alongside these shows (where possible) to draw out more insights about the era.
    Feuer is wonderfully smart, and she's great fun, too - her book doesn't shy away from using the first person occasionally, and it keeps the read from becoming overly scholarly and dry.
    Some of the concepts discussed here aren't the easiest to grasp, but once everything clicks, you'll notice your heart start beating a little faster when you stumble upon a rerun of Miami Vice.

  • The previous reviewer obviously did not understand the complex theories presented in the book. Feuer is presenting a "post-modern" theory of drama series in the 1980's. She describes 1980's to be the golden age of the TV Drama and a postmodern view from the other grand age of TV Drama of the 1950's. Feuer not only presents a unique way of critiquing TV Drama, but presents theories that can be argued to other genres both in the TV spectrum and the film world. I would also like to point out that Feuer also wrote a book entitled "The Hollywood Muscial" and was quoted as being brilliant by the New York Times. I would like to recommend both books by Feuer and encourage other readers to try to understand the views presented in both books. I hope everyone else will enjoy them as much as I have...

  • there is no limit to the extent that most (communist)knee jerk liberals will utilize to tear down the r.reagan legacy. this man did rescue us from the carter malaise and also saved us from the carter mishandling of foreign policy. all thinking people do understand that r.r was our national savior. this book is just another example of an author attempting to pander to what the media is attempting to feed the ignorant few, there would be no other option for her to be published. do not buy this book.(remember pravda).