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ePub Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society) download

by Susan L Burns

ePub Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society) download
Author:
Susan L Burns
ISBN13:
978-0822331834
ISBN:
0822331837
Language:
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books (December 2, 2003)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1898 kb
Fb2 file:
1681 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
470

A Weatherhead Study of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University. Durham, North Carolina, Duke University Press, 2003. Jews in the Early Modern English Imagination: A Scattered Nation. Transculturalisms, 1400–1700 series. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2012.

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. Volume 67 Issue 3. SUSAN L. BURNS

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. BURNS: English Français. Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. BURNS: Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan. Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society. x, 282 pp. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2003.

Before the Nation book. Burns analyzes the modern reassessments of nativism, concluding that there is a gap between the cultural community preached in the Tokugawa Era and the national community constructed in the Meiji Era. The answers I desired from this book begin to unravel in the final chapter, where we can truly see the effects of nativist studies on the public and in policy. Los Angeles: UCLA Asia Pacific Monograph Series, 2002. Constructing the National Body: Public Health and the Nation in Meiji Japan.

Departing from earlier studies of kokugaku that focused on intellectuals whose work has been valorized by modern scholars, Burns seeks to recover the multiple ways . 1 Late Tokugawa Society and the Crisis of Community. 16. The Divine Age Narrative in Tokugawa Japan.

Departing from earlier studies of kokugaku that focused on intellectuals whose work has been valorized by modern scholars, Burns seeks to recover the multiple ways "Japan" as social and cultural identity began to be imagined before modernity. Central to Burns's analysis is Motoori Norinaga’s Kojikiden, arguably the most important intellectual work of Japan's early modern period. Burns situates the Kojikiden as one in a series of attempts to analyze and interpret the mythohistories dating from the early eighth century, the Kojiki and Nihon shoki. 35. Discovering Japan.

"Before the Nation" is a significant addition to the field of Japanese intellectual history and a very fine book. -Leslie Pincus, author of "Authenticating Culture in Imperial Japan: Kuki Shuzo and the Rise of National Aesthetics". We are the LARGEST ACADEMIC USED BOOKSTORE between New York and Chicago, with more than TWO MILLION second-hand and out-of-print SCHOLARLY BOOKS IN ALL FIELDS

Shows how a modern nationalism was constructed in Japan from existing notions of community, at. . Duke University Press Books.

Shows how a modern nationalism was constructed in Japan from existing notions of community, at a time before the idea of "nation. Exploring the emergence and evolution of theories of nationhood that continue to be evoked in present-day Japan, Susan L. Burns provides a close examination of the ury intellectual movement kokugaku, which means "the study of our country.

writings, preferring the term 'Japan as community. Abruptly, in the last three pages of the book, she switches, borrowing from Prasenjit Duara to adopt the term 'culturalism. It might have been better to do this earlier, if ‘culturalism’ is indeed a better term. After useful introductory chapters on the intellectual, political and social crises of late Tokugawa Japan, and on earlier Tokugawa understandings of the Kojiki, Burns begins with the prominent figure of Motoori Norinaga (1730-1801), author of the Kojikiden, an annotated version of the Kojiki that began to circulate in 1780, becoming 'a consistent point of.

Exploring the emergence and evolution of theories of nationhood that continue to be evoked in present-day Japan, Susan L. Departing from earlier studies of kokugaku that focused on intellectuals whose work has been valorized by modern scholars, Burns seeks to recover the multiple ways "Japan" as social and cultural identity began to be imagined before modernity. Central to Burns's analysis is Motoori Norinaga’s Kojikiden,.

Late Tokugawa society and the crisis of community - Before the Kojikiden : the divine age narrative in Tokugawa Japan - Motoori Norinaga . Duke University Press (2003). Similar books and articles

Late Tokugawa society and the crisis of community - Before the Kojikiden : the divine age narrative in Tokugawa Japan - Motoori Norinaga : discovering Japan - Ueda Akinari : history. Similar books and articles. National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State.

Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture . Harootunian treats nativism as a discourse and shows how it functioned ideologically in Tokugawa Japan.

Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan (Asia-Pacific: Culture, Politics, and Society). Tokugawa Ideology: Early Constructs, 1570-1680 (Michigan Classics in Japanese Studies). Harry Harootunian is the Max Palevsky Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Chicago and an adjunct senior scholar at the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University.

Exploring the emergence and evolution of theories of nationhood that continue to be evoked in present-day Japan, Susan L. Burns provides a close examination of the late-eighteenth-century intellectual movement kokugaku, which means "the study of our country.” Departing from earlier studies of kokugaku that focused on intellectuals whose work has been valorized by modern scholars, Burns seeks to recover the multiple ways "Japan" as social and cultural identity began to be imagined before modernity.

Central to Burns's analysis is Motoori Norinaga’s Kojikiden, arguably the most important intellectual work of Japan's early modern period. Burns situates the Kojikiden as one in a series of attempts to analyze and interpret the mythohistories dating from the early eighth century, the Kojiki and Nihon shoki. Norinaga saw these texts as keys to an original, authentic, and idyllic Japan that existed before being tainted by "flawed" foreign influences, notably Confucianism and Buddhism. Hailed in the nineteenth century as the begetter of a new national consciousness, Norinaga's Kojikiden was later condemned by some as a source of Japan's twentieth-century descent into militarism, war, and defeat. Burns looks in depth at three kokugaku writers—Ueda Akinari, Fujitani Mitsue, and Tachibana Moribe—who contested Norinaga's interpretations and produced competing readings of the mythohistories that offered new theories of community as the basis for Japanese social and cultural identity. Though relegated to the footnotes by a later generation of scholars, these writers were quite influential in their day, and by recovering their arguments, Burns reveals kokugaku as a complex debate—involving history, language, and subjectivity—with repercussions extending well into the modern era.

  • The translations in this book are excellent and some of them on the nature of kami and kokoro remain quite memorable to me, necessitating several rereadings. Professor Burns chose a great focus and gives the subject a thoughtful and thorough treatment. But I have to wonder if members of the kokugaku school really existed in a state "before the nation" as she claims. Certainly, Tokugawa Japan was in a state of crisis about the direction of the nation's future. But was there a word for "community" at the time? As far as I'm aware there is not even a native word for "community" in modern Japanese. Professor Burns seems to have mixed up linguistic history: nation comes first, community second.

  • All in all, this book both clarifies and drastically changes one's ideas about kokugaku in Japan. The exploration of what are today considered "unorthodox" kokugaku scholars is interesting and really brings to light the complexity and plurality within this "school of thought" (if one may still call it that). And the comparison of different scholars' glosses on the first part of the "Kojiki" for what it tells us about their differing agendas is a masterful method. Really fascinating.
    This would easily be a five-star book if it weren't for the inconsistent editing. For some reason Tanuma Okitsugu's personal name keeps on showing up here as "Okitsuga." Annoying typos and sentences bearing traces of incomplete revision further mar what is otherwise an excellent and exemplary piece of scholarship.