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ePub The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford (American Presidency (Univ of Kansas Paperback)) download

by John Robert Greene

ePub The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford (American Presidency (Univ of Kansas Paperback)) download
Author:
John Robert Greene
ISBN13:
978-0700606399
ISBN:
0700606394
Language:
Publisher:
University Press of Kansas (November 28, 1994)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1890 kb
Fb2 file:
1674 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit docx lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
147

The Presidency of Gerald. has been added to your Cart. Four decades later, Gerald Ford’s presidency is well on its way to being forgotten outside of various paeans to our 38rd president for offering healing after Watergate

The Presidency of Gerald. Four decades later, Gerald Ford’s presidency is well on its way to being forgotten outside of various paeans to our 38rd president for offering healing after Watergate. Ford was dealt a bad hand and played it to the best of abilities, argues John Robert Greene in this book. Frankly some of the more contemporary presidents are underserved in Kansas’ American Presidency series but Ford isn’t one of them.

American Presidency Series. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas.

The presidency of Gerald Ford began on August 9, 1974, when Gerald Ford became President of the United States upon the resignation of Richard Nixon from office, and ended on January 20, 1977, a period of 895 days

The presidency of Gerald Ford began on August 9, 1974, when Gerald Ford became President of the United States upon the resignation of Richard Nixon from office, and ended on January 20, 1977, a period of 895 days. Ford, a Republican from Michigan, had served as Vice President of the United States since December 6, 1973, following Spiro Agnew's resignation from that office.

By Shawn FrancisPeters. Landmark Law Cases and American Society. Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2003. 1995 By Shawn FrancisPeters. Volume 75 Issue 1 - Eric Michael Mazur.

John Robert Greene extends and revises our understanding of Ford's . Published November 28th 1994 by University Press of Kansas.

John Robert Greene extends and revises our understanding of Ford's struggles to restore credibility to the presidency in the wake of Watergate and Vietnam. Based on extensive This is the first comprehensive study of one of our most popular yet most misunderstood presidents. Reaching well beyond the image of Ford as "healer" of a war-torn and scandal-ridden nation. The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford.

John Robert Greene is an American historian who is the Paul J. Schupf . Schupf Professor, History and Humanities, the director of the Social Science Program, and the College Archivist, at Cazenovia College in Cazenovia, New York. Retrieved 2015-11-03.

University Press of Kansas, 1995.

John Robert Greene In addition, Greene details Ford's rise to prominence within the Republican Party; chronicles the president's problematic relations with hi. .

This is the first comprehensive study of one of our most popular yet most misunderstood presidents. In addition, Greene details Ford's rise to prominence within the Republican Party; chronicles the president's problematic relations with his staff, the new Democratic Congress, and Ronald Reagan; sheds new light on the selection and performance of Vice-President Nelson Rockefeller; offers new insights into the election of 1976; and provides the first in-depth look at Ford's Amnesty Program for. Vietnam Era Draft Evaders.

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The presidency of gerald r. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. Gerald Ford comes across here as an average nice guy who was thrust into the hot seat of a banished president and who tried to heal a demoralized nation in the aftermath of Watergate and Vietnam.

This is the first comprehensive study of one of our most popular yet most misunderstood presidents. Reaching well beyond the image of Ford as "healer" of a war-torn and scandal-ridden nation, John Robert Greene extends and revises our understanding of Ford's struggles to restore credibility to the presidency in the wake of Watergate and Vietnam.Few presidents had ever been asked to achieve so much in so little time against such great adversity. Greene shows that Ford's efforts to lead the nation were severely hampered by Nixon's misdeeds, by America's ignominious disengagement from an unpopular war, and by a watchdog Congress eager to put a brake on presidential power.Working from a wealth of recently declassified documents, Greene reveals new evidence on Ford's roles in Watergate and challenges the prevailing view of the infamous Mayaguez incident. He argues persuasively that Ford made no "deal" with Nixon, but that his pardon of Nixon was costly nonetheless, for it shadowed his entire presidency thereafter. He also shows that the Mayaguez catastrophe was less a simple "rescue mission" than it was an attempt to revive sagging political fortunes by attacking Cambodia.In addition, Greene details Ford's rise to prominence within the Republican Party; chronicles the president's problematic relations with his staff, the new Democratic Congress, and Ronald Reagan; sheds new light on the selection and performance of Vice-President Nelson Rockefeller; offers new insights into the election of 1976; and provides the first in-depth look at Ford's Amnesty Program for Vietnam Era Draft Evaders.Based on interviews with Ford and more than sixty individuals who figured prominently in his presidency and on extensive use of the Ford Library, Greene's study illuminates Ford's valiant efforts during some of the presidency's most troubled years.
  • A surprisingly uninspiring work. The major focus of the book is that Richard Nixon is a bad man. Not just a bad man, but a very bad man. I had hoped to learn more about Gerald Ford. Instead I learned that Richard Nixon is a morally corrupt figure and certainly a bad, bad man.
    The author conveys that every element of the Ford Administration was under the cloud of how bad Richard Nixon really was.
    I have not read anything else by this author, but the first half of the book appeared to have been written by one of his graduate students, however.
    The previous sentence is an example of the writing in the first half of the book, where Richard Nixon is shown to be a bad man and the word that pops up just before a period is however.
    A proofing error came with the discussion on unemployment. There is a silly math error on page 68 that detracts from the author's point where he states unemployment "reached 5.4 percent, a .01 percent rise...". The point the author is making is that unemployment was a serious issue but he failed to compare that rate with any period before. So it is unproven if this really was a significant matter.
    The second half of the book improves as he discussed issues that confronted President Ford and almost quits reminding the reader that Nixon is a bad man. The author criticizes Ford for not providing a clear set of policy goals. Yet the author acknowledges near the end of his work that President Ford, indeed, did have a goal in mind. Here is where the author could have turned a 3-star book into a 5-star book. Rather than beating Nixon up for being a very bad man, a better theme would have been to discuss how well Ford met his goal: To Heal a Nation.
    President Ford articulated that his goal was to bring healing. A more interesting review of the Ford Administration would have been to see how close Mr. Ford came to reaching that goal. The first issue to confront Mr. Ford was what to do with Nixon (that very bad man). President Ford granted President Nixon a full pardon to set aside any further criminal prosecution. The nation had been through twenty years of increasing unrest due to the struggle for Civil Rights, the War in Asia, and the deceits of Presidents Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon. The news media had gone from carefully protecting the office of the President to an incredibly adversarial role, which further inflamed passions in the country. How did the pardon figure into calming the unrest? Would it have been better to delay the pardon and let the unrest rise to a higher boil, or to cut the losses and start the healing?
    This actually is the central characteristic of the Ford Administration. A book focused on how well President Ford attained his goal would have been much more interesting.

  • The forward of this book says, "The aim of the American Presidency Series is to present historians and the general reading public with interesting, scholarly assessments of the various presidential administrations." Based on the two volumes that I have read so far, I would say this series achieves its aims. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

    If indirection was a main theme of the Eisenhower Administration, then policy reversals were a main theme of the Ford Administration. Over and over again President Ford would completely reverse his position on policy, and usually for political expediency. He was going to fight inflation by proposing a tax hike. On October 8, 1974 he proposed a one year "five percent income tax surcharge on corporate and upper-level individual incomes" in order to reduce the deficit and fight inflation. Within a very short period of time, he scrapped that proposal and proposed a tax cut. Conservatives, like Secretary of the Treasury William E. Simon, were deeply concerned that such a cut would enlarge the deficit substantially. Ford, the pragmatic politician, opted for the more popular route. He replaced the 5% surcharge tax increase with a 12% tax rebate. Some in the press called it a "flip flop." There were other policy reversals during his administration.

    I was interested in the analysis of Ford's handling of the Mayaguez incident. The Khmer Rouge government asserted that the Mayaguez, an American merchant ship, had strayed into their coastal waters. It seems from the beginning that the administration was eager to show force. I was struck how, at times, they were willing to bomb areas when they did not know if the crew of the ship was within the bombing area. Fortunately the crew was returned safely, but not before some Marines were killed in the process. The analysis of the Mayaguez incident is found in the chapter entitled, "Let's Look Ferocious."

    Other issues like Reagan's primary challenge, the pardon of Nixon, Carter's win, and détente are given balanced analyses also. The kind of balanced assessment in this book makes me want to buy another book in the American Presidency Series. I'm sure I will do just that. I highly recommend this book!

  • Too much to read. Gave to my local library.

  • Four decades later, Gerald Ford’s presidency is well on its way to being forgotten outside of various paeans to our 38rd president for offering healing after Watergate. Ford was dealt a bad hand and played it to the best of abilities, argues John Robert Greene in this book. Frankly some of the more contemporary presidents are underserved in Kansas’ “American Presidency” series but Ford isn’t one of them. Greene provides a solid and readable account of his administration, taking readers far beyond the pardon of Richard Nixon and the clashes with Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter in 1976. Greene both instructs and entertains and isn’t bewildered by the larger than life personalities in the administration who often overshadowed Ford himself: Nelson Rockefeller, Henry Kissinger, James Schlesinger, Don Rumsfeld, Dick Cheney, we can go on here. A solid work which is very readable. Highly recommended.