mostraligabue
» » Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism

ePub Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism download

by Benedict Anderson

ePub Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism download
Author:
Benedict Anderson
ISBN13:
978-0860915461
ISBN:
0860915468
Language:
Publisher:
Verso; Revised edition (May 1998)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1496 kb
Fb2 file:
1127 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx lit docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
795

Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism

Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. VERSO London, New York. The moral rights of the author have been asserted.

Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism is a book by Benedict Anderson. It introduces a popular concept in political sciences and sociology, that of imagined communities named after it. It was first published in 1983, and reissued with additional chapters in 1991 and a further revised version in 2006. Zuelow described this book as "perhaps the most read book about nationalism".

Imagined Communities remains the most influential book on the origins of nationalism. This is the definitive text on the nationalism. Anderson postulates that nations are a complex, socio-political, and cultural constructs that emerge in the imagining of groups of people. He traces three main, interrelated themes of influence in the imagining of nations.

Imagined Communities book. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the 'imagined communities' of nationality.

I know Anderson has done more work in the area since the original publication of this work, but I have not read it yet. I hope that work refines his original thesis a bit which seems to simplistic on the chain of causation from material base to the effect of nationalism

I know Anderson has done more work in the area since the original publication of this work, but I have not read it yet. I hope that work refines his original thesis a bit which seems to simplistic on the chain of causation from material base to the effect of nationalism. Perhaps he simplified to stretch his model over more examples, but I would be interested to see Anderson's take on post-Soviet Europe and Asia. A solid recommend, but not a breezy read by any means.

Imagined Communities remains the most influential book on the origins of nationalism, filling the vacuum that previously existed in the traditions of Western thought

Imagined Communities remains the most influential book on the origins of nationalism, filling the vacuum that previously existed in the traditions of Western thought. Written with exemplary clarity, this illuminating study traces the emergence of community as an idea to South America, rather than to nineteenth-century Europe. Far and away the most influential study of nationalis. s well-versed in novels and poetry as he was in scholarship, Anderson was an eloquent advocate for global culture.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-212) and index.

Anderson's essay shows how the European processes of inventing nationalism were transported to the Third World through colonialism and were adapted by subject races in Latin America and Asia. Categories: Other Social Sciences\Sociology. Издание: Rev Sub. Издательство: Verso.

Imagined Communities, Benedict Anderson’s brilliant book on nationalism, forged a new field of study when it first appeared in 1983. Since then it has sold over a quarter of a million copies and is widely considered the most important book on the subject.

What makes people love and die for nations, as well as hate and kill in their name? While many studies have been written on nationalist political movements, the sense of nationality—the personal and cultural feeling of belonging to the nation—has not received proportionate attention. In this widely acclaimed work, Benedict Anderson examines the creation and global spread of the ‘imagined communities’ of nationality.Anderson explores the processes that created these communities: the territorialisation of religious faiths, the decline of antique kingship, the interaction between capitalism and print, the development of vernacular languages-of-state, and changing conceptions of time. He shows how an originary nationalism born in the Americas was modularly adopted by popular movements in Europe, by the imperialist powers, and by the anti-imperialist resistances in Asia and Africa.This revised edition includes two new chapters, one of which discusses the complex role of the colonialist state’s mindset in the development of Third World nationalism, while the other analyses the processes by which all over the world, nations came to imagine themselves as old.
  • The recent rise of nationalism, as reflected by the vitriolic nature of national politics in many countries had inspired me to seek answers in Benjamin Anderson’s seminal work. ‘The Imagined Communities’ was originally published in 1983, and the current revised edition was released in 2006. This is the definitive text on the nationalism. Anderson postulates that nations are a complex, socio-political, and cultural constructs that emerge in the imagining of groups of people. He traces three main, interrelated themes of influence in the imagining of nations.
    Firstly, he explores the influence of language, script and mass literacy, with the fall of the old ‘sacred’ languages like Latin and the spread of vernacular language through the advent of ‘print capitalism’ (a happy merger between print technology and capitalism). Secondly, the de-authorization of centripetal power structures, like monarchies and dynasties with divinely vested rule is examined. Finally, the very notion of time are reimagined is flat and continuous.
    Benedict Anderson makes his concepts relevant to global citizens by drawing examples from Europe and the former colonies in the Americas and Asia. The independence achieved by the colonies in the Americas were in a different time and had different influences, compared to the fairly recent colonial independence of the South East Asian countries. Being a South East Asian scholar, Anderson lovingly contrasts the colonies of French Indochina and the Dutch East Indies, detailing the influences that caused Indochina to fragment into three separate states (Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia), while the vast and varied island populations of Dutch East Indies to meld with relative harmony into Indonesia. Also explored are the shaping of a nation’s borders and consciousness by its conquerors by means of economic and military defined maps, national census that require categorisation of people and the propaganda of antiquities in museums.
    This is a compelling read, albeit a fairly difficult one. Anderson writes mainly in English, but scattered in are words, sentences and paragraphs in innumerable other languages, thus the narration is stunted. Also, the author writes for a more educated audience, as a layperson in the fields of sociology, political science, and history, I struggled with the sometimes unhelpful footnotes and references. Nevertheless, this is a compelling read, and I am happy to note translated to many languages to reach a wider audience.

  • Great on Nationalism as a finished modular Euro-Western product. Weak on the Afro-Asian aspect. Modernist prophet of nationalism of the gang of four: Gelner, Bedourie, Hobsbawm.

  • A classic look at the inherent constructedness of nationalism, Anderson's book and his definition of the nation as a (limited and sovereign) imagined community are still essential to any study of modern nationalism or the rise of nation-states. He bases the rise of the nation on the development of print culture in Europe, which helped popularize vernacular literature and standardize national languages. Two criticisms: (1) despite his use of examples from around the world, his analysis is still quite Eurocentric. For example, I'm not sure if his theory can deal with the fact that China had print culture 500 years before Gutenberg, had a standardized script 1000 years before that, yet did not form a "nation" that would fit his definition. (2) The nationalism Anderson describes in detail is really a nationalism of literate elites, especially beyond his "first wave" of nationalism in the Americas. Here Eugen Weber's Peasants into Frenchmen would be a good complement. But the book is still extremely valuable, and eye-opening for anyone who believes that their nation really has primordial origins.

  • While ostensibly a modernist, Anderson's "Imagined Communities" differs from his peers as he, like the primordialists before him, believes that language is central to creating a sense of community or nationalism, although language was not necessarily a decisive factor or the most essential. For Anderson, nationalism is an anomaly which is not accounted for by either Marxian or liberal theory. Instead, nationalism is bound up in mortality, religion, language and culture. While acknowledging the centrality of language, Anderson also proposes there are three sequential causes resulting in the rise of nationalism: "print-capitalism," the rise of new elites (particularly in the Americas), and the bureaucratic "weld" or grafting of nations onto empires (particularly as with Great Britain, Russia, and France). The nationalism that flourished in the Americas was marked by its hostility of their colonial elites towards the authority centers or metropoles in Europe. Nationalism in the decolonization era was marked by the same hostility towards the European metropoles, but emphasized the use of indigenous languages and class consciousness by nationalists to create communities where none had existed before, such as in Indonesia, or to shore up diverse multi-ethnic entities as in China or Vietnam. Anderson differs most markedly from other modernists, such as Ernest Gellner and Eric Hobsbawm, by countering that nationalism is not so much about ideology as it is an anthropological phenomenon, hence Anderson's use of the term "Imagined Communities." While nationalism to Anderson is the product of modernity, it is an inclusive rather than exclusive phenomenon, driven by ever-changing factors which varied from region to region, and from age to age, focusing on what diverse peoples have in common. Anderson's approach is that nationalism draws extensively upon the past as a means of creating new social structures.

    As a result, Anderson's argument is closer to more recent scholarship by other modernists such as David A. Bell, Linda Colley, and Lisa Cody, who argue nationalism predated the 19th Century by a hundred years or more.
    As opposed to Gellner and Hobsbawm, who advance the theory that nationalism is a more recent phenomenon dating to the 19th Century and driven by ideology, capitalism and industrialization, Anderson and the others advocate that the modern age is much older and that language and other cultural factors played a much larger role in the origins and evolution of nationalism. Countered against the arguments made the more recent ethnosymbolist scholarship by Patrick Geary and Anthony D. Smith, Anderson makes an interesting and compelling argument that is less rigid than earlier modernists like Gellner and Hobsbawm. If anyone has a chance of redeeming modernist interpretations regarding nationalism then Anderson certainly is among those with a chance of making the case.