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ePub Nothing Less than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History download

by John David Lewis

ePub Nothing Less than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History download
Author:
John David Lewis
ISBN13:
978-0691135182
ISBN:
0691135185
Language:
Publisher:
Princeton University Press; First Editiion edition (February 14, 2010)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1685 kb
Fb2 file:
1854 kb
Other formats:
txt lrf docx azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
979

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Nothing Less Than Victory book. The goal of war is to defeat the enemy's will to fight  . Start by marking Nothing Less Than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

"John David Lewis offers a superb appraisal of how ancient and modern wars start and finish. This chronicle of some 2,500 years of Western history is replete with a philosophical analysis of why nations fight, win—and lose

"John David Lewis offers a superb appraisal of how ancient and modern wars start and finish. This chronicle of some 2,500 years of Western history is replete with a philosophical analysis of why nations fight, win—and lose. His insights and conclusions are original and fearless—as well as timely and welcome in the confused war-making of the present ag. "—Victor Davis Hanson, author of Carnage and Culture. "This book's argument is powerful and provocative, and Lewis is a good storyteller and scholar.

Home Browse Books Book details, Nothing Less Than Victory: Decisive .

Home Browse Books Book details, Nothing Less Than Victory: Decisive Wars and the. Nothing Less Than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History. Nothing Less than Victory provocatively shows that aggressive, strategic military offenses can win wars and establish lasting peace, while defensive maneuvers have often led to prolonged carnage, indecision, and stalemate. Lewis examines the Greco-Persian and Theban wars, the Second Punic War, Aurelian's wars to reunify Rome, the American Civil War, and the Second World War.

Nothing Less than Victory provocatively shows that aggressive, strategic military offenses can win wars and establish lasting peace, while defensive maneuvers have often led to prolonged carnage, indecision, and stalemate. Taking an ambitious and sweeping look at six major wars, from antiquity to World War II, John David Lewis shows how victorious military commanders have achieved long-term peace by identifying the core of the enemy's ideological, political, and social support for a war, fiercely striking at this objective, and demanding that the enemy acknowledges its defeat.

Nothing Less than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History (Princeton University, March, 2010). Solon the Thinker: Political Thought in Archaic Athens (Duckworth Press, 2006) (pb. edn. 2008). Early Greek Lawgivers (Bristol Classical Press, August, 2007).

John David Lewis holds that this defeatist attitude is completely at odds with the lessons of history. In Nothing Less than Victory: Decisive Wars and the Lessons of History, Lewis shows how nations in the past that faced far greater threats and more formidable foes than America does now went on to defeat their enemies and win lasting peace. Lewis examines six major wars, devoting one chapter each to the Greco-Persian wars, the Theban wars, the Second Punic War, the campaigns of the Roman emperor Aurelian, the American Civil War, and two chapters to World War II.

Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and Other Classic Fairy Tales of Charles Per by Angela Carter. The bizarre history of Birobidzhan could not be left to a more capable custodian than Masha Gessen

Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and Other Classic Fairy Tales of Charles Per by Angela Carter. The bizarre history of Birobidzhan could not be left to a more capable custodian than Masha Gessen. From the acclaimed author of The Man Without a Face, the previously untold story of the Jews in twentieth-century Russia that reveals the complex, strange,. Winner of the National Jewish Book Award Emma Lazarus’s most famous poem gave a voice to the Statue of Liberty, but her remarkable story has remained.

Download PDF book format. Victory and the moral will to fight "To look without flinching": the Greco-Persian wars, 547-446 BC "Only one omen is best": the Theban wars, 382-362 BC "I will have my opponent": the Second Punic War, 218-201 BC "A prince necessary rather than good": the campaigns of Aurelian, AD 270-275 "The hard hand of war": Sherman's march through.

The goal of war is to defeat the enemy's will to fight. But how this can be accomplished is a thorny issue. Nothing Less than Victory provocatively shows that aggressive, strategic military offenses can win wars and establish lasting peace, while defensive maneuvers have often led to prolonged carnage, indecision, and stalemate. Taking an ambitious and sweeping look at six major wars, from antiquity to World War II, John David Lewis shows how victorious military commanders have achieved long-term peace by identifying the core of the enemy's ideological, political, and social support for a war, fiercely striking at this objective, and demanding that the enemy acknowledges its defeat.

Lewis examines the Greco-Persian and Theban wars, the Second Punic War, Aurelian's wars to reunify Rome, the American Civil War, and the Second World War. He considers successful examples of overwhelming force, such as the Greek mutilation of Xerxes' army and navy, the Theban-led invasion of the Spartan homeland, and Hannibal's attack against Italy--as well as failed tactics of defense, including Fabius's policy of delay, McClellan's retreat from Richmond, and Chamberlain's appeasement of Hitler. Lewis shows that a war's endurance rests in each side's reasoning, moral purpose, and commitment to fight, and why an effectively aimed, well-planned, and quickly executed offense can end a conflict and create the conditions needed for long-term peace.

Recognizing the human motivations behind military conflicts, Nothing Less than Victory makes a powerful case for offensive actions in pursuit of peace.

  • Publishers Weekly writes many short blurbs for Amazon. And they usually do a great job. Unfortunately, their assertion that Lewis veers close to arguing that "might makes right" is completely wrong. Consider Lewis's take on the Third Punic War--which he says was not a war at all but rather a massacre:

    "Rome was wrong; the peace of Scipio Africanus was good, and the Romans could have preserved it by just mediation of the Carthaginian complaints. The Romans appointed a successor to Masinissa in 149; they could have ended the Numidian attacks. It is to Romans' eternal shame--there is no credit due here--that they slaughtered a former enemy that had accepted peace and was living by its word.

    "Readers tempted to interpret the thesis of this book as the need for total destruction of an enemy's population centers should consider the decades that followed the Second Punic War, when former enemies were at peace, with the needless sacrifice of that peace in the destruction of Carthage--and the civil unrest and violence that followed in the next generation for the Romans. . . .

    "The Second Punic War remains the example of a successful victory," says Lewis at chapter's end. The Third was "a needless and unforgiveable slaughter."

    The idea that "might makes right" is nowhere in the above. Nor is it to be found elsewhere in the book. Lewis in fact explicitly states that the opposite is true. After showing how the "relative commitment of each side to its moral cause . . . affected the outcome of [each] conflict," Lewis says that something more than just commitment is involved. "The truth," according to Lewis, "matters"--"the strongest power belonged to those who were, in fact, right, if those who were right knew it."

    "This may be unfashionable to say today--in an intellectual climate that sunders fact and value, and understands moral claims as inherently contested matters of opinion--but it remains a demonstrable fact that the Spartan and Confederate slave systems were morally debased and that the freedom upheld by the Thebans and the Union was good.

    "The political autonomy upheld by the Greeks, as well as the political relationships between Rome and its Italian allies, was superior to the alternatives presented by Persia and Carthage. Certainly, the war between America and Japan in 1945 was not fought over morally equivalent options--not if peace and prosperity for millions of people are valued.

    "The tragedy of Munich is in the failure of the British to recognize that their own moral norms could become weapons when manipulated by a vicious dictator. The British and the Americans--like the Greeks--became truly unbeatable when they grasped how right they really were. As the war progressed, public exposure of the enemy's actions strengthened the victor's knowledge of its own moral rectitude and discredited their former enemies' failed policies in their own eyes."

    The overall lesson of Lewis's book is to take ideas seriously, especially moral ideas. Those interested in how such ideas have influenced history will enjoy this clearly-written and often-engrossing book. But they should not look forward to or reject it on the grounds that it supports a "might makes right" viewpoint. It does not. And hopefully this review--or "response" to be correct--shows that.

  • too bad lewis died. i fully subscribe to most. it would have lent strength to juxtapose our longest war, the war against the pirates of the coast of barbary, that should have ended like the marines planned in total unconditional surrender of the paschas once and forever , instead ended in a gloriously written peace agreement in 1805.

    here we are 200 years later bombing the sons of the ottomans, isis at the very same spot we stopped in 1804, sirte, with our most moden weapons, b2's. the casus belli ist unchanged: piracy and kidnappings, evil. in between lie 200 years of incessant wars from atatuerk to rommel and eisenhower and hillary clinton.....incredible. but wait, theres more: carthago and the punic wars, then the visigoths....i think libya has been plowed over for centuries by swords and bombs and tanks. and there is no end in sight....nothing unless we get total unconditional victory there!

    i hope victor davis hansen completes that book!

  • I thoroughly enjoyed the substance of this book, and indeed it greatly helped me make up my mind about the proper conduct of warfare. The lesson, that moral ideas are to be taken seriously as a/the major cause of human events, is of incalculable value to any student of history, whether he is interested specifically in affairs of war, or not. Nothing else will adequately explain how, time after time, a seemingly inferior force can achieve overwhelming strength; whether it be the ancient Greeks successfully standing up to a ridiculously stronger Persian army, or Germany going from a defeated nation with no military to speak of, back to being the dominating power in Continental Europe, able to set the world ablaze once more within a span of barely twenty years.

    Much as I loved the substance of the book, however, I must criticize the often sloppy conversion in the Kindle edition, which I read. (At least I hope the same errors aren't in the print edition!) Words are missing, spaces within a word where it is obv iously unintentional, typos abound. For just one concrete example: the ultimate conclusion of the book, in its last sentence, misspells the Latin phrase: "Sic [sic!] vis pacem, para bellum" - it is, of course, supposed to be "si".

    4 stars because the sloppy editing ought not to keep any lover of history from appreciating the substance of this book, but needs to be remarked upon nonetheless.

  • A perplexing question many politicians fail to ask and answer is how can my country win a war. In failing to come to terms with what needs to be done, and doing it, generation after generation of free nations continue to give their enemies continued chances to destroy them.

    When we fail to look at history and learn, we continue to make the same mistakes, over and over.

    John David Lewis uses history to tell us in clear language what we need to do - nothing less than victory.