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ePub The War Within, a Secret White House History 2006-2008 download

by Bob Woodward

ePub The War Within, a Secret White House History 2006-2008 download
Author:
Bob Woodward
ISBN13:
978-1436151047
ISBN:
143615104X
Language:
Publisher:
Recorded Books; Unabridged edition (2008)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1753 kb
Fb2 file:
1256 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.8
Votes:
360

The book mainly focuses on the politics and decisions that led up to the surge

The book mainly focuses on the politics and decisions that led up to the surge. The surge can be seen as Bush's last major decision prior to his departure.

The War Within: A Secret White House History (2006–2008) is a non-fiction book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward that was released by publisher Simon & Schuster on September 8, 2008. It is the fifteenth book written by Woodward, the fourth in a series of books about President George W. Bush and his administration's foreign policy including Bush at War, Plan of Attack, and State of Denial.

This book covers the Bush Administration from early 2006 until about mid 2008. Its an interesting tale, The War Within by Bob Woodward is damage control and a shift towards hope following the earlier State of Denial.

A first printing with in line. Publisher priced dust jacket  . This book covers the Bush Administration from early 2006 until about mid 2008. We see the President try to deal with the increasing problems that were evident in Iraq, problems that contradicted President Bush's overly optimistic public statements. President Bush and his administration finally woke up, and the question was what to do next.

In his fourth book on President George W. Bush, Bob Woodward takes readers deep inside the tensions, secret debates, unofficial back channels . Bush, Bob Woodward takes readers deep inside the tensions, secret debates, unofficial back channels, distrust and determination within the White House, the Pentagon, the State Department, the intelligence agencies and the . military headquarters in Iraq. government from 2006 through mid-2008.

Электронная книга "The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008", Bob Woodward

Электронная книга "The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008", Bob Woodward. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

ALSO BY BOB WOODWARD State of Denial The Secret Man (with .

ALSO BY BOB WOODWARD State of Denial The Secret Man (with a Reporter's Assessment by Carl Bernstein) Plan of Attack Bush at War Maestro: Greenspan's Fed and the American Boom Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate The Choice The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House The Commanders Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA 1981ñ1987 Wired: Th.

General George Casey, the commander in Iraq, believes that President Bush does not understand the war and eventually concludes he has lost the president's confidence. On the verge of revolt, they worry that the military will be blamed for a failure in Iraq. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice strongly opposes a surge of additional .

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In his fourth book on President George W. Bush, Bob Woodward takes readers deep inside the tensions, secret debates, unofficial backchannels, distrust, and determina- tion within the White House, the Pentagon, the State Department, the intelligence agencies, and the .

The Bob Woodward rollout is always strictly scripted. Bush, Bob Woodward takes readers deep inside the tensions, secret debates, . General George Casey, the commander in Iraq, believes that President Bush does not understand the war and eventually concludes he has lost the president's confidence. Похожие книги: State Of Denial. State of Denial examines how the Bush administration a. ar within.

Bob Woodward is the legendary investigative journalist who helped break the story behind the infamous Watergate break-in. His critically acclaimed and New York Times best-selling accounts of the George W. Bush administration are packed with rare insights and compelling analyses that build from exclusive interviews and penetrating research. This fourth installment focuses on the final phase of one of American history's most controversial presidencies.
  • There's a lot missing here, specifically, the role of the vice-president who was able to completely control the conversation for many years. After the collapse of the cold war, the war in Iraq was dredged up to provide us with a replacement enemy. Also, the administation was attempting to get us involved in a number of brush wars, courtesy of elements inside the pentagon. If we ONLY examine the Iraq war, and not other elements of the ill-considered Global War on Terror, we will miss the whole picture. At the time, the Pentagon had been introducing a number of fabricated reports on terrorist activities around the globe in an attempt to regain relevancy in the 21st century. The Iraq War, in many ways, was secondary to the idea behind a global war against insurgencies.
    I particularly appreciated the parts of the book devoted to Meghan O'Sullivan's role, who was seen by several elements in the administration as someone who was undercutting their authority. The reality was, her role was to describe what was happening on the ground, the real situation. Tome after tome has been written about Iraq, a lot of it being simply finger pointing, but little about what was actually being accomplished. The State Department was completely cut out of any postwar planning until several years had passed.

  • This book, for me, raised one huge question: What do I want in a President ?

    George Bush, for all his faults, was strong in his decisions. Once he made up his mind, he stuck with his decisions.

    The above comment can be a blessing or a curse especially to the President of the USA. Standing alone in your decisions when everyone else in the world is against you takes a massive amount of guts but, it can also be a double edged sword that brings about your downfall. You want that ability to stand firm in a world leader but, where's the line drawn between guts and, what may be termed, Presidential decorum? There is a point where you have GOT to start listening and maybe review your decisions. The inability to review, I feel, was Bush's major downfall.

    Bob Woodward interviewed all the Senior cabinet members and the upper echelons of the military and from all that came this 500 page account of post invasion Iraq from 2006-2008. The book mainly focuses on the politics and decisions that led up to the surge. The surge can be seen as Bush's last major decision prior to his departure.

    Bush was not going to allow a lost cause in Iraq to be his legacy so he was very in favor of the surge. Some on the ground were hesitant due to a concern that Iraq should be getting used to less American force on the ground not more. The violence was escalating and therefore more troops were needed. The American public were growing wearier, day by day, of the costly war therefore, the surge is a bad idea. Seasoned veterans and military buffs explained that to effectively fight an insurgency more, not less, troops are required. Back and forth, round and round.

    Many asked, "what does the end in Iraq for America look like?" "What does winning look like?" "What's our measure of success?" These questions were hard to find answers for and, maybe should have been answered prior to 2003.

    As his 2nd term wore on Bush became less and less popular so, denying the surge for political and popular reasons made no sense. He, above everything else, wanted to win due to his ideology of a free and prosperous Iraq. Having found no WMD it was now a humanitarian issue and Bush knew he couldn't just back out and leave the warring factions to slaughter each other. Talk about a quagmire.

    This book is fascinating and very well written. It's purely politics so it wont appeal to everyone as it can drag a little here and there but, that's sometimes the nature of politics. Surprisingly absent is the voice of Cheney who many believed ran the presidency.

    If you're interested in Iraq 2006-2008 and the politics surrounding the surge, this is a great read.

  • When I read a new book by Bob Woodward, two questions normally come to my mind: (1) Why in the world would people let him interview them on the record or on background, knowing that he will report their statements in some publication? (2) Once these statements end up in print, why do so few attack him as distorting what they said or of making up quotations? Each question is fascinating in itself. And the answers may well tie together. If one wants his or her views on the record, it will happen with Woodward. And my sense is that he is normally very accurate (why else would there be so few complaints, relatively speaking?). Anyhow, here we go again--"The War Within."

    This is a book about the Bush Administration's change of policy with respect to Iraq. It begins before the elections of 2006, when things were falling apart in Iraq. Even stalwart Republican Senators began to question the war and the Administration's policy regarding it. Even while the President was telling the country that progress was being made, several evaluations of policy were occurring simultaneously (and not always informing one another): the military evaluation, centered on a platoon of colonels assessing matters; Stephen Hadley's examination (he was National Security Advisor); the Iraq Study Group, led by James Baker and Lee Hamilton; a group headed by Meghan O'Sullivan. One thing that is clear from all the groups' examination of the status of the Iraq war--things were not working. Generals and Administration figures were speaking positively of the war, and these various groups were telling a far different story. In fact, the President, saying one thing in public, had come to embrace the perspective of Hadley and others. Things began to happen--Donald Rumsfeld was replaced by Robert Gates at Defense; the concept of the "surge" began to gain some degree of support.

    Some of the high points: discussions of the President's own thinking (based on interviews with Woodward), inside accounts of meetings among military leaders and war critics, within the Iraq Study Group, and so on. At the end of the book, Woodward notes how this book builds on his third in a series on the Bush presidency, "State of Denial." He notes how, in that work, how the President was not openly acknowledging problems in Iraq and the deterioration of conditions on the ground. As Woodward said in the final passages in that book (Page 433 in "The War Within"): "With all Bush's upbeat talk and optimism. . .he had not told the American public the truth about what Iraq had become." He goes on to say "My reporting for this book showed that to be even more the case than I could have imagined."

    His final evaluation (Page 437): "There was no deadline, no hurry [in the President's leadership on Iraq]. The president was engaged in the war rhetorically but maintained an odd detachment from its management. He never got a handle on it, and over these years of war, too often he failed to lead." Fairly bracing language from Woodward. Does he make the case? I think that that judgment should be left to each reader. Whatever one might think of Woodward and the president, this book does spark thinking about the subject.