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by Peter F. Drucker

ePub The End of Economic Man: The Origins of Totalitarianism download
Author:
Peter F. Drucker
ISBN13:
978-1560006213
ISBN:
1560006218
Language:
Publisher:
Transaction Publishers; Revised edition (January 1, 1995)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1371 kb
Fb2 file:
1747 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
464

Peter F. Drucker (1909-2005) is known by many as the father of modern management.

Peter F. He was Clarke Professor of Social Science and Management at Claremont Graduate School in California and was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He is the author of over thirty-five books, including The Ecological Vision, The Concept of the Corporation, and A Functioning Society. After its breakdown freedom and equality became projected into the social sphere: man became first Political and then Economic Man. Freedom and equality became social and economic freedom and social and economic equality.

Drucker, Peter Ferdinand, 1909-. Fascism, Europe - Politics and government - 1918-1945. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by station09. cebu on March 4, 2019.

Drucker provides a special addition to the massive literature on existentialism and alienation since World War II. The End of Economic Man is a social and political effort to explain the subjective consequences of the social upheavals. The End of Economic Man is a social and political effort to explain the subjective consequences of the social upheavals caused by warfare. Drucker concentrates on one specific historical event: the breakdown of the social and political structure of Europe which culminated in the rise of Nazi totalitarianism to mastery over Europe. He explains the tragedy of Europe as the loss of political faith, resulting from the political alienation of the European masses.

Drucker provides a special addition to the massive literature on In The End of Economic Man, long recognized as a. .The book was singled out for praise on both sides of the Atlantic, and is considered by the author to be his most prescient effort in social theory.

Drucker provides a special addition to the massive literature on In The End of Economic Man, long recognized as a cornerstone work, Peter F. Drucker explains and interprets fascism and Nazism as fundamental revolutions. In some ways, this book anticipated by more than a decade the existentialism that came to dominate the European political mood in the postwar period.

In 1939 fascist totalitarianism had assumed the proportions of a world revolution

Original Title: The end of economic man - the origins of totalitarianism - Peter Drucker. In 1939 fascist totalitarianism had assumed the proportions of a world revolution.

DRUCKER, Peter F. The End of Economic Man. A Study of the New Totalitarianism. On publication in 1939, Winston Churchill soundly championed Drucker’s End of Economic Man and made it required reading for newly graduated British officer. New York: John Day, (1939). Octavo, original black cloth, original dust jacket, uncut and partially unopened. Housed in a custom chemise. Ultimately Drucker’s historical perspective and a view that big business and nonprofit enterprises were the defining innovation of the 20th century led him to pioneering social and management theories (New York Times). Foreword by Drucker; introduction by .

Peter Drucker wrote, Totalitarianism was a revolution that replaced hope by despair, reason by magic . The Best Quotes from The End of Economic Man by Peter Drucker. History studies what happens on the surface

Peter Drucker wrote, Totalitarianism was a revolution that replaced hope by despair, reason by magic, belief by the frenzied, blood thirsty violence of the terror stricken. The Social Justice Warriors of the left rip apart anyone, whether their own members or others, who express dissenting views are one example of this. History studies what happens on the surface. The –isms like communism, the philosophical systems, may be the atmosphere, but society is its ecology.

In The End of Economic Man, long recognized as a cornerstone work, Peter F.

the origins of totalitarianism. Harper Colophon books - CN 163. Classifications. Published 1969 by Harper & Row in New York, NY. Written in English. Politics and government, Fascism, Totalitarianism, Politics. xxx, 271 p. Number of pages.

In The End of Economic Man, long recognized as a cornerstone work, Peter F. Drucker explains and interprets fascism and Nazism as fundamental revolutions. In some ways, this book anticipated by more than a decade the existentialism that came to dominate the European political mood in the postwar period. Drucker provides a special addition to the massive literature on existentialism and alienation since World War II. The End of Economic Man is a social and political effort to explain the subjective consequences of the social upheavals caused by warfare.

Drucker concentrates on one specific historical event: the breakdown of the social and political structure of Europe which culminated in the rise of Nazi totalitarianism to mastery over Europe. He explains the tragedy of Europe as the loss of political faith, resulting from the political alienation of the European masses. The End of Economic Man is a book of great social import. It shows not only what might have helped the older generation avert the catastrophe of Nazism, but also how today's generation can prevent another such catastrophe. This work will be of special interest to political scientists, intellectual historians, and sociologists.

The book was singled out for praise on both sides of the Atlantic, and is considered by the author to be his most prescient effort in social theory.

  • “Central to the modern age had been the belief that society could be made rational, could be ordered, controlled, understood. With the collapse of Marxism as a secular creed, society became again irrational, threatening, incomprehensible, menaced by sinister powers against which the individual has no defense. (xix)

    Drucker believes Marxism, and in fact, European culture broke down in 1914. Why?

    “With Christianity, freedom and equality became the two basic concepts of Europe, they are themselves Europe. For two thousand years all orders and creeds of Europe developed out of the Christian order and had freedom and equality as their goal. European history is the history of the projection of these concepts into the reality of social existence.’’ (51)

    How produced ‘social existence’?

    “Realization of freedom and equality was first sought in the spiritual sphere. The creed that all men are equal in the world beyond and free to decide their fate in the other world by their actions in this one . . . . That every last judgement at a church door shows popes, bishops, and kings in damnation was not just a romantic fantasy of a rebellious stonemason. . . . It saw and understood man as Spiritual Man, and his place in the world and in society as a place in a spiritual order. And it made theology an ‘exact science.’’’ (51)

    What happened? (no real freedom found here in this world) Who replaced the ‘spiritual man’?

    “When this order collapsed, freedom and equality became projected into the intellectual sphere. The Lutheran creed, which made man decide his fate by the use of his free and equal intellect in interpreting the Scriptures, is the supreme - though neither the only nor the last - metamorphosis of the order of Intellectual Man.’’ (51)

    This ‘intellectual man’ also disappeared in his turn (he couldn't find freedom and equality either). Where now can ‘freedom and equality’ be found?

    “After its breakdown freedom and equality became projected into the social sphere: man became first Political and then Economic Man. Freedom and equality became social and economic freedom and social and economic equality. Man’s nature became a function of his place in the social and economic order in which his existence found his explanation and its reason.’’ (52)

    ‘Economic Man’! I know him! (me)? What social results?

    “In Marxism this conception of the world and of society reaches its climax. The faith in the attainability of freedom and equality in and through the economic sphere is restated and based upon the very failure of capitalism to reach this goal.’’ (52)

    Drucker’s focus is not on the material, economic results of capitalism. He looks to the assumed goal - freedom and equality. This is the real, important, overriding, and fundamental demand of European culture.

    “Marxism is one of the most grandiose, most profound creeds which Europe has ever produced. But Marxism hinges on a dialectic play upon the concept of freedom, which comes dangerously near abandoning freedom altogether.’’ (52)

    Remember, Drucker wrote this in 1933!

    The Anti-Facist Illusion
    The Despair of the Masses
    The Return of the Masses
    The Return of the Demons
    The Failure of the Christian Churches
    The Totalitarian Miracle
    Fascist Noneconomic Society
    Miracle or Mirage?
    The Future: East Against West?

    Drucker’s understanding of European thought focuses on religious foundations. He sees religion has given much to European history and yet. . .

    “The impotence and inadequacy of the forces of religion just at the time when they are most urgently needed is perhaps the most disheartening feature of the European situation today.’’ (108)

    Why so inadequate?

    “It is impossible to be a revolutionary from within an existing order. Yet a Christian cannot act otherwise as long as the forms and institutions of the churches are intact. The Christian new integration can become successful only after the routine of the churches has been destroyed or, in other words, after persecution or social revolution have rendered impossible the maintenance of the outward institutions. (109)

    Well. . .this is how Christianity started. Christians to the lions! Romans are gone. Christians are still here!

    “That the churches and the Christian religion will be persecuted under totalitarianism beyond anything we have seen till now, appears certain. And therein lies the one real possibility that the work of the revolutionary forces within the churches will ultimately bear fruit.’’ (110)

    Insightful. The submission of Christendom to Hitler, Stalin, etc., and in fact to the entire war lust, destroyed its credibility. As far as I know, Jehovah's Witnesses were the only organized religion that resisted (and many do not accept them as part of Christendom). A notable percentage of victims in the camps were witnesses. Of course, many others (as individuals) suffered for conscience.

    One fascinating section is Drucker's analysis of Nietzsche. . .

    “It might seem incongruous to call him as a witness for the Christian elite. But there is no doubt in my mind that his whole work centers in the attempt to avoid the acceptance of Christianity, and his breakdown was caused in the last instance - whatever its physical causes - by the realization that he had run into a blank wall where the denial of his own rationality and sanity had become the only alternative to Christianity.’’ (97)

    Wow! What happened?

    “When the Superman proved a shallow illusion whereof the last works bear evidence in their resignation and fear, the experiment to set up a valid non-Christian concept of man and of society collapsed. (98)

    Other writers use Nietzsche’s insanity as metaphor for European insanity.

    This work is outside mainstream thought. Even though many of his opinions have stood the test of time, they challenge the current ear. Especially his vision that highlights religion. Nevertheless, his insights reveal causes that a purely secular thinker would miss.

    Not a difficult read, but requires serious effort. This is not a scholarly explanation for academics, but a sincere effort to inform interested readers. Reminds me in some ways of Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom’’. Some different concepts, some contrasting opinions, but both writing, even pleading, for understanding - although offering unpopular conclusions.

    No index, although a three page appendix providing insight on people mentioned.

    No photographs.

  • As a German citizen, raised in the USA long after the war, I have had a lifelong curiosity about the horrors of WW-II. I've read Shirer's "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" and Kennedy's "Freedom From Fear" Both are fine books but they have an unavoidable post-facto bias.

    The unique thing about this book is that it was written in 1933 from a contemporary point of view, and published in 1939 before the full horror of the holocaust was known. It lacks the omniscient feel of a well researched book, written after all the captures nazi archives were dutifully cataloged. But I would argue that all these other books, however rational and well meaning the authors may be, are tainted by an emotional need to explain away and encapsulate the past.

    We all dutifully say "Never Again" but deep down we want to believe that it could never really happen to us anyway, because we are inherently better than that. Post-facto analysis tends to support that bias, by explaining the flaws in the German character (they are too cold and calculating, or too obedient and follow orders blindly, or whatever) that made it possible then and there, but impossible here and now.

    Reading a genuinely contemporary analysis, from 1933, removes that subtle bias, and in so doing exposes it. That alone make the book a must read. In particular Drucker's take on how despair leads people to get mad at reason and make an emotional del to voluntarily reject reason in favor of the feel good propaganda of the fascists is incredibly valuable. Reading that history puts the modern epidemic of Fake News into a chilling light.

    "Never Again" can be taken as a statement of denial. The truth is it *can* happen again. This contemporary analysis of the rise of fascism makes it easier to see the warning signs.

  • The first book in English written by Peter Drucker. This paperback reprint includes a new preface written by the author. As it was published more than sixty years ago, some of the contents are unavoidably outdated. Being a collector of Drucker's works, I heartily welcome this reprint.