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ePub Jawbreaker: The Attack on Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda: A Personal Account by the CIA's Key Field Commander download

by Gary Berntsen

ePub Jawbreaker: The Attack on Bin Laden and Al-Qaeda: A Personal Account by the CIA's Key Field Commander download
Author:
Gary Berntsen
ISBN13:
978-0307351067
ISBN:
0307351068
Language:
Publisher:
Broadway Books; Reprint edition (October 24, 2006)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1194 kb
Fb2 file:
1800 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi azw txt
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
711

The Book the CIA Doesn’t Want You to Read Gary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight . The author also explains the situation at Tora Bora and why it is believed Al Qaeda escaped into Pakistan’s tribal area

The Book the CIA Doesn’t Want You to Read Gary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul. The author also explains the situation at Tora Bora and why it is believed Al Qaeda escaped into Pakistan’s tribal area. With great frustration it seems the author believes it was an internal political issue that prevented the US from blocking this region and preventing the escape. This particular section of the book is worth reading in detail as it is unfortunately true that success has many fathers but failure has none.

Gary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit-and cornering-of Osama bin Laden, and the reason the terrorist leader escaped American.

Gary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit-and cornering-of Osama bin Laden, and the reason the terrorist leader escaped American retribution. As disturbingly eye-opening as it is adrenali The Book the CIA Doesn’t Want You to Read.

The attack-August 7, 1998 - The declaration - Deployments - CTC/ - Negotiations - Panshir Valley - Shomali Plains - Mazar-e Sharif - Amir - The fall of. .Books for People with Print Disabilities.

The attack-August 7, 1998 - The declaration - Deployments - CTC/ - Negotiations - Panshir Valley - Shomali Plains - Mazar-e Sharif - Amir - The fall of Kabul - Kabul - Team Juliet - Bilal - General Tommy Franks - Qala-i Jangi fortress. Tora Bora - The Battle of Milawa - Adam Khan - Hamid Karzai - Escape. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on August 12, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The Book the CIA Doesn t Want You to Read Gary Berntsen, the CIA s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit and cornering of Osama bin Laden, and the reason.

The Book the CIA Doesn t Want You to Read Gary Berntsen, the CIA s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit and cornering of Osama bin Laden, and the reason the terrorist leader escaped American retribution.

Berntsen, until recently one of the CIAUs most decorated officers, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit of Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda. 0 people like this topic.

I believe the author of this book when he says that Bin Laden was not among those so evacuated–Bin Laden’s style would be to distrust a Pakistani offer of air evacuation, and to want to lead his men directly over ground to sanctuary.

by Gary Berntsen and Ralph Pezzullo. New York: Crown Publishers, 2005. maps, glossary, index. Berntsen is a veteran of the CIA’s Directorate of Operations. He joined in the early 1980s, at a time when CIA officers were being killed or kidnapped overseas.

The Book the CIA Doesn’t Want You to ReadGary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under. The Book the CIA Doesn't Want You to Read Gary Berntsen, the CIA's key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit-and cornering-of Osama bin Laden, and the reason the terrorist leader escaped American retribution.

The Book the CIA Doesn’t Want You to ReadGary Berntsen, the CIA’s key commander coordinating the fight against the Taliban forces around Kabul, comes out from under cover for the first time to describe his no-holds-barred pursuit—and cornering—of Osama bin Laden, and the reason the terrorist leader escaped American retribution. As disturbingly eye-opening as it is adrenaline-charged, Jawbreaker races from CIA war rooms to diplomatic offices to mountaintop redoubts to paint a vivid portrait of a new kind of warfare, showing what can and should be done to deal a death blow to freedom’s enemies.
  • This is a particularly interesting book written by the CIA officer in charge of the initial war on Al Qaeda. The author was part of the second team of CIA officers sent to the region and performed a magnificent job of destroying our nation’s enemy post 9-11.

    One of the things I most enjoyed about this book was the integration of multiple elements of our intelligence and military forces. It was amazing to see how they were used to produce a syngeneic effect on the battle field. The previous experience of the CIA in the era of the Russian invasion was critical to the development of the alliances required to destroy Al Qaeda.

    The author makes an interesting point regarding the concept of intelligence based warfare. One of the major concepts being utilization of resources for maximum effect at a minimal destruction to targets that are not targeted.

    Admittedly this book does drag down a little with the political issues that needed to be addressed in order to create that alliance. But it makes up for it when describing American soldiers riding horse-back into confrontations with the enemy. To my knowledge, the last American cavalry charge took place in the Philippines in World War Two.

    The author also explains the situation at Tora Bora and why it is believed Al Qaeda escaped into Pakistan’s tribal area. With great frustration it seems the author believes it was an internal political issue that prevented the US from blocking this region and preventing the escape. This particular section of the book is worth reading in detail as it is unfortunately true that success has many fathers but failure has none.

    Over all this is a very interesting book about the war in Afghanistan. If you enjoyed this then I would strongly suggest First In: How seven CIA officers opened the war on terror in Afghanistan by Gary Schroen and most certainly Hank Crumpton’s book The Art of Intelligence: lessons from a Life in the CIA’s clandestine service as they both deal with direct intervention in Afghanistan. I would also recommend Hard Measures by Jose A Rodriguez as a primer for what happens when you have key assets with information derived from the battle field.

  • Great read. Gives you insight into the inner workings of the CIA and to the gigantic effort to capture or kill bin Ladin. The author submitted his work to the agency for approval prior to publishing and left all the lined out text. It made me respect him for doing so. In my opinion ALL the seals that have been publishing accounts of their experiences should have done the same.
    It was hard to put down. My hat is off to the brave men and women of the US intelligence community and military.

  • Berntsen gets 5 stars for what he did, at least according to what he shares in the book. He would have gotten 5 stars for his book with improved writing and editing out the redacted parts (its not bad, but not as good as others).

    I read "First In" before this book, and that helped put the story together for the parts that were confusing or lacking in Jawbreaker.

    Jawbreaker is written a bit choppy and at times hard to follow. Some of that is the author/editor's fault, some is due to censors. Some parts of the story are cut too short and others are too long and the transitions are confusing.

    The CIA redaction is clearly annoying. The book may be better written by eliminating the redaction and editing the story to flow better.

    It is very clear that the author was rightfully frustrated by some of the bureaucracy of the US government during the war and also by the people that censored his book, especially when I read redacted parts in other books, as Berntsen points out.

    His book is a little heavy on bravado and self aggrandizement, but I love the kind of leader he describes himself as. Our military needs more people like him that are not afraid to make decisions and do their job, which is my guess why he was so heavily censored. Weak leaders don't like strong ones. Unfortunately he wasn't always allowed to do what he should have been able to do, and that is the part of the story you must read. I suspect that may be why his book was so heavily censored and First In does not appear to be.