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by Mahmood Mamdani

ePub The Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste and Class in an indian Village download
Author:
Mahmood Mamdani
ISBN13:
978-0853452843
ISBN:
0853452849
Language:
Publisher:
Monthly Review Press; New Ed edition (January 1, 1972)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1668 kb
Fb2 file:
1300 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
473

by Mahmood Mamdani (Author).

A study of why the big birth reduction campaign put on by the Indian government and the Rockefeller Foundation in an Indian village in the Punjab failed so dismally. by Mahmood Mamdani (Author).

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Start by marking The Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste . Some of the analysis of the class structure of agrarian society is dated by now, which has implications for the arguement that rural people favour larger families.

Start by marking The Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste and Class in an Indian Village as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Long term demographic decline can and has taken place in rural areas as well, with factors such as female literacy being key. However, as a critique of how top-down, modernist, Very similar to post-modernist critiques of development programmes circulating today, though this is written in the 1970s and utilises a more Marxist paradigm.

Mamdani specialises in the study of African and international politics, colonialism and postcolonialism, and the politics of knowledge . The Myth of Population Control: Family, Class and Caste in an Indian Village (1972).

Mamdani specialises in the study of African and international politics, colonialism and postcolonialism, and the politics of knowledge production  . From Citizen to Refugee: Ugandan Asians Come to Britain (1973). Politics and Class Formation in Uganda (1976). Imperialism and Fascism in Uganda (1984). Academic Freedom in Africa (1994).

Mamdani criticises the ‘population problem’ theorists and their assumptions about economic growth, particularly the rural population growth of the third world

Mamdani criticises the ‘population problem’ theorists and their assumptions about economic growth, particularly the rural population growth of the third world. Between 1954 and 1969 the Khanna study attempted to find ways of controlling the rural population and to measure the effects of family planning in terms of birth and death rates. The final aim of the study was to see what effect population control had on the health and social status of the rural population. The basic assumption which runs through the book is that people are not poor because they have large families, quite the contrary;.

Mahmood Mamdani, "State Formation and Conflict". Mahmood Mamdani Beyond Criminal Justice: Learning from South Sudan. Peace and Justice - The Roots of Mideast Terror - Mahmood Mamdani, P. Mamdani delivers rousing TB Davie Memorial Lecture. South Sudan: The Road to Civil War - A Lecture by Mahmood Mamdani.

The Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste and Class in an Indian Village. Charles S. Brant (a1). Sir George Williams University.

He grew up in Uganda and acquired his . from the University of Pittsburgh, before going on to attain his Masters and PhD from Harvard University in 1974. The Myth of Population Control: Family, Caste and Class in an indian Village". Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism". When Victims Become Killers.

No current Talk conversations about this book. In 2008, in an open online poll, Mamdani was voted as the 9th "top public intellectual" in the world on the list of Top 100 Public Intellectuals by Prospect Magazine (UK) and Foreign Policy (US). Citizen and Subject: Contemporary Africa and the Legacy of Late Colonialism. Mamdani specialises in the study of African and international politics, colonialism and postcolonialism, and the politics of knowledge production.

Clean, tight book. A study of why the big birth reduction campaign put on by the Indian government and the Rockefeller Foundation in an Indian village in the Punjab failed so dismally. Bibliography.173pp.
  • Since the time of Thomas Malthus, problems of resource scarcity and social pathology have frequently been attributed to "overpopulation," largely caused by the alleged overbreeding by the world's poor. If only those impoverished masses who bear so very many children realized the error of their ways, the reasoning goes, the "population explosion" and its attendant problems could be diffused. Moreover, their own poverty would be alleviated, since they would have fewer mouths to feed.
    Champions of this Malthusian perspective generally have eschewed any efforts to actually investigate what life is like for the high-fertility poor who fuel the world's rapid population growth. In this slim but incisive book, however, sociologist Mamoud Mamdani demonstrates that by actually investigating and analyzing social reality from the perspective of those who choose to have large families, one can gain an understanding of the rationality behind this lifestyle choice. Indeed, in his study of a village society in northern India, he shows that these rural peasants are not poor because they have many children, they have many children because they are poor. High fertility is, in fact, a reasonable, even necessary choice for people with few resources other than their own labor power and that of their children. Mamdani shows that only when people's basic human needs for material security, health care, and support in old age are met can they begin to consider different life strategies that do not involve having large numbers of offspring.
    When it first appeared during the 1970's, Mamdani's book was revolutionary in its influence on the population/resources debate among environmentalists. Some hardline neo-Malthusians have refused to budge from their "population control by any means" position, but many others have come to realize that for people to be amenable to family planning measures, social and economic reforms on a large scale must be implemented.
    The one area where Mamdani's perspective is too narrow involves the role of women in fertility decisions. His study emphasizes the husband and wife as a decision-making unit making successive choices regarding additional births. In reality, however, women often don't have any choice at all as to how large their finished family size might be, and their husbands frequently insist on a larger family than the wife might desire. Indeed, over the past twenty years, it has become clear that empowering women and providing them more choices in their lives is another avenue to lower fertility.
    Mamdani fails to emphasize this feminist aspect of the population question, but in presenting a concise and thoughtful analysis of how population growth occurs at the local level, he has made a lasting contribution to social and environmental science.

  • This magnum opus shines the light on the evil negative eugenics that has descended on us since Spencer, Galton, Sanger, National Socialism, Marxism, Rockefellers, neo-Maltusian ZPGers, The American Birth Control Society and its bastard child, the kill-for-profit Planned Parenthood. MM's book is a primer for the pre and post application of infanticide on the poor. The same with the term "education" which translates to "kill your baby so we NIMBYs will have less of you poor to worry about drinking our water and eating our food." Even the so-called "earth first" crowd has estimated this planet could support 30 billion people indefinitely. It's only the Western colonialist/Marxist mind-set that sees this as a problem and they fail to report that a child is more than a life, he or she is an asset to the poor, any poor. This sort of "liberal white man's burden" constantly tells the poorest of the poor that if they have fewer, or no children, they will be better off. The real question is, "who is they?" This book is a good colloquial examination that will tell you who they are as well as Gary Allen's None Dare Call It Conspiracy will tell you what they are.

  • This book was certainly important and useful in pointing out that individual motives determine fertility choices so policy should pay attention to structuring individual incentives. Clearly educating women, increasing incomes, urbanization, social security pensions for the elderly, lower infant mortality, liberating women, legalizing birth control and abortion, subsidizing birth control and abortion all tend to reduce the number of children couples prefer. But, the implication that family planning policies were misguided and wrong leaves out "the tragedy of the commons" (title of Garrett Hardin's famous essay). While it might have been individually rational for each poor Indian couple to have a large family (for old age support, etc.), it was almost certainly collectively irrational. I can't quite recall the number, but I believe it is 150,000 poor farmers who have committed suicide in India in recent years, because their wells ran dry and they ran out of hope. The "Green Revolution" that allowed India to feed itself better as population doubled and doubled again during the 20th century was based on genetics (high yielding wheat, rice, etc.), nitrogen fertilizer and irrigation. The higher yielding varieties of grains, however, require more inputs of nitrogen and water, both of which are being mined out. Nitrogen is currently made from natural gas, India relies heavily on fossil groundwater that is being mined out and water from Himalayan glaciers that are disappearing due to global warming. Undoubtedly many soils are being damaged as well, reducing future productivity. So, in the long run, it is likely that India will need to impose family planning, as China did, because its peasants are getting poorer not richer. The European demographic transition pattern is not an option. It is clear that low fertility is strongly associated with improved outcomes. I checked statistics for three classes of countries (over 200 countries in total): Low fertility (TFR<2.1, about 2.9 billion people, middle fertility countries (TFR 2.1-4.1, about 2.7 billion people, and high fertility countries (TFR>4.1, about 1.1 billion people). People in low fertility countries had incomes five times higher, 21 year longer life expectancy, infant mortality about 1/7th as people in high fertility countries. And most wars and genocides occur in high fertility places.