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ePub Africa Doesn't Matter: How the West Has Failed the Poorest Continent and What We Can Do About It download

by Giles Bolton

ePub Africa Doesn't Matter: How the West Has Failed the Poorest Continent and What We Can Do About It download
Author:
Giles Bolton
ISBN13:
978-1559708654
ISBN:
1559708654
Language:
Publisher:
Arcade Publishing; First Edition edition (May 7, 2008)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1614 kb
Fb2 file:
1870 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
991

Africa Doesn't Matter book.

Africa Doesn't Matter book. Why is Africa still poor? What happens to the billions of aid dollars given yearly? Why do trade rules that fail African countries also cost us at the checkout line? Why doesn't Africa matter? In this engaging, jargon-free, reader-friendly guide, longtime aid worker and diplomat Giles Bolton offers his radical analysis of the problems Africa faces, drawing on years of expe Why is Africa still poor? What happens to the billions of aid dollars given yearly? Why do trade rules that fail African countries also cost us at the checkout line?

Giles Bolton has worked in Africa and development for more than ten years as an aid worker and diplomat, with postings in Kenya and Rwanda. He now advises African governments on their relationships with the West. He lives in London, England.

Giles Bolton has worked in Africa and development for more than ten years as an aid worker and diplomat, with postings in Kenya and Rwanda. Paperback: 360 pages.

Africa has many killer diseases. Regardless of who was at fault, the debt crisis left the West in what ought to have been a terrible dilemma. No, it doesn't-or at least, little more so than other parts of the world. How did Africa's debt crisis come about? In the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, African governments took out countless loans that Western governments and banks happily farmed out to them with little regard to how they would be repaid. Some went to prop up bad governments or military regimes that are now long gone, often in pursuit of cold war agendas. Sharh yozish qoidalari.

Gifts & Registry. Bolton illustrates how the needs of African states exceed their budgets, leaving a gap for aid to fill; how the way Western aid is delivered renders it largely ineffective; and how trade rules and globalization have worked against African development.

This highly readable critique of current Western policies toward Africa is authored by a British former aid official, and one of the book's strengths is the number of vivid anecdotes and vignettes with which he illustrates his larger argument. It begins with an overview of African poverty issues before discussing the West's aid and trade policies and how they affect Africa

Why is Africa still poor? What happens to the billions of aid dollars givenĀ .

Why is Africa still poor? What happens to the billions of aid dollars given yearly? Why do trade rules that fail African countries also cost us at the checkout. Africa Doesn't Matter : How the West Has Failed the Poorest Continent and What We Can Do about It. by Giles Bolton.

Africa doesn't matter. Screw you, too. Change : action heroes. Similar Items Ladysmith, Giles Foden

Africa doesn't matter. What happens next? Powerless or complacent? Profit in virtue. Similar Items Ladysmith, Giles Foden. Samyama yoga : basic stretch series, by Bill Giles and Judy Bolton. Soviet Middle East studies : an analysis and bibliography, A. R. C. Bolton. Find in other libraries.

What happens to the billions of aid dollars given yearly? Why do trade rules that fail African countri. Africa doesn't matter. Screw you too. What happens next? Powerless or complacent?

Africa doesn't matter. how the west has failed the poorest continent and what we can do about it. Published 2007 by Arcade Pub. in New York Africa doesn't matter.

A long-time aid worker and diplomat offers a provocative analysis of the social and economic problems facing Africa, offering insight into how the continent's difficulties are affecting everyday western life while sharing anecdotes about the human side of African struggles. Simultaneous.
  • This was a really well written book and after I took a class about African culture, I gave this to my sister to read.

  • Raises similar points to End of Poverty and other books, but also has more detail on trade, and frames some other topics well (e.g. looking for NGOs that foster ownership, capacity and sustainability).

  • Giles Bolton worked in Kenya and Rwanda as an aid worker and explains that government subsidies to US cotton farmers exceed the entire US government aid to sub-Saharan Africa. In 2002, US cotton subsidies were approximately $156,000 per cotton farmer, more than enough for farmers to retrain or convert to non-subsidized crops.

    Bolton reveals farm subsidies for European, American and Japanese cows are more than $2, $3 and $7 daily, respectively, while most Africans subsist on less than $1 daily.

    Many African climates can produce cotton and cows more efficiently than climates in the developed nations where agriculture is supported, with expensive government subsidies.

    Bolton explains that eliminating agricultural subsidies for cotton, beef, and milk would allow nations such as Chad, Mali, Benin, Burkina Faso, and Kenya to develop healthy economies, by exporting cotton, beef and other agricultural products to world markets.

    Bolton explains a large percentage of African governmental debt was for weapons and military aid provided by the US and communist bloc nations, during the cold war.

    Aid successes discussed include Uganda and Mozambique. In thirteen years, the number of Ugandans living below the poverty line decreased from 56 to 31 percent; primary school enrollment increased from 62 percent to almost 90 percent and HIV prevalence decreased from 18 percent to 6 percent. In Mozambique, absolute poverty decreased from 69 percent to 50 percent and real GDP gerowth was about 8 percent.

    Bolton discusses the considerable progress made eradicating smallpox, polio and guinea worm from Africa.

    Bolton also discusses the notorious Mobutu Sese Seko and the aid stolen or wasted in Zaire, as an example of what can go wrong, with African aid and governments.

    Al Queda, Al Shabaab and other terrorist groups will continue moving into Mali, Somalia and other impoverished nations,if African poverty is not decreased.

    Steven Sponaugle

  • A great book on the subject. As I read the book (almost finished) I'm amazed at how clearly he exposes the issues surrounding Africa, development (or lack of), trade, corruption, aid, etc.

    I've always wondered why was Africa so poor and with such an apparent lack of prospects. I remember way back many, many years ago, a school trip to an exhibit on africa and poverty. There was great emphasis (almost exclusive) on corruption and western aid. As the book explains, yes: corruption is a big problem and yes: western nations do provide some aid. But both aid and corruption have a story to tell of their own. As well as many other factors.

    The reality is that Africa's story has a lot to do with the Western world. And to the Western world "Africa doesn't matter" even though our actions have a big effect on African people.

    Again: it's a great book, very well written, very clear insights into the issues surrounding Africa.

    *** update ***

    I've just returned from working in Nigeria (for just over a year) as an expatriate in the oil and gas industry. And I can now truly say "I get it". Wow, what an eye opener. I find the book still valid (and very good reading), but it misses to cover/ mention the truly, truly "why" of Africa. It's something that needs to be experienced and difficult to explain concisely.

  • While too basic for those already well-versed in the minutiae of the plight of Africa, this book is a welcome primer for the vast majority of us who do not know much about why this landmass lags behind in most areas of material human progress. As Bolton shows us, the problem is not just that we are ignorant but that we hold factually incorrect views: views that dramatically overestimate how much America donates to the world and then also project fantastically high levels of corruption and ineffiency onto governments of every African country.

    Aside: For those wondering, we donate about 0.21% of our national income as aid to developing nations. That means that for every $100 an American makes per year, he/she effectively gives 21 cents to the poorer nations on Earth. That compares to the internationally agreed-upon minimum of 70 cents per person (The most generous, Norway and Denmark, give about $1 per person per year). In terms of the American federal government's budget, foreign aid only comprises 1% of the budget, while the average American thinks that we spend a whopping 15% of our budget on foreign aid!

    The author also makes the welcome point that far from helping out ungrateful African nations, we often hinder their efforts to join the modern globalized world through restrictive trade practices and onerous demands for repayments of debts incurred long ago by corrupt dictators. While not revolutionary, his practical advice on how to change the West's indifferent approach to the poverty in Africa serves as a solid starting-off point. Highly recommended.