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ePub Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art (Ideologies of Desire) download

by Richard Meyer

ePub Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art (Ideologies of Desire) download
Author:
Richard Meyer
ISBN13:
978-0195107616
ISBN:
0195107616
Language:
Publisher:
Oxford Univ Pr (Txt) (January 2004)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1688 kb
Fb2 file:
1702 kb
Other formats:
lit mobi doc lrf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
652

Representations argues that censorship has produced a set of unintended "representations and . This book does for twentieth-century American art what Vito Russo's "The Celluloid Closet" does for twentieth-century cinema.

Representations argues that censorship has produced a set of unintended "representations and ons. The illustrations and reproductions are brilliantly choreographed with the text.

Outlaw Representation book. Start by marking Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

book by Richard Meyer. These words, famously spoken in 1964 by United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart, became the rallying cry of the anti-obscenity lobby as their enraged howls became the soundtrack to a tumultuous mixture of modern art, homosexuality, and public funding. Author Richard Meyer charts the history of this American culture war through detailed analysis of the work of artists who fought on.

in Twentieth-Century American Art, Richard Meyer crafts a brilliant and persuasive argument about the interdependence of representations of homosexuality and acts of censorship. Throughout the book, Meyer excels at close, detailed visual interpretations of images. Rigorous analyses of color, of actual paint application, of sitters' postures and their costumes all yield nuanced readings of the terms by which homosexuality is represented and censored. Meyer's text provides a sophisticated, nuanced, theoretically informed reading that is nonetheless jargon-free.

Book DescriptionFrom the . Navy's confiscation in 1934 of a painting of sailors on shore leave to the ongoing culture wars over federal funding to the arts, conflicts surrounding homosexuality and creative freedom have shaped the history of modern artin America. Richard Meyer's "Outlaw Representation" illuminates this history through its careful analysis of the works of homosexual artists and the circumstances under which these works have been attacked, suppressed, or censored outright.

He is the author of Outlaw Representation, a book about censorship and homosexuality in American art, and What Was . Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art. New York: Oxford University Press.

He is the author of Outlaw Representation, a book about censorship and homosexuality in American art, and What Was Contemporary Art?, as well as a contributor to Artforum magazine. In 2013, he co-authored the book Art and Queer Culture, with Catherine Lord. "New building, new faculty demonstrate ambitious growth plans for Stanford's Department of Art and Art History". What Was Contemporary Art? Cambridge: MIT Press, 2013.

Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Ar. This was no less the case in the Spanish anarchist movement during the first decades of this century.

Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art. Apr 1950. By analyzing one influential anarchist journal of the time, the Revista Blanca, this essay examines the treatment of same-sex eroticism by some Spanish. anarchists and attempts to place their understanding and treatment of this in the context of the time.

His first book, Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American .

His first book, Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art, was awarded the Charles . Richard Meyer, Robert and Ruth Halperin Professor in Art History, teaches courses in twentieth-century American art, the history of photography, arts censorship and the first amendement, curatorial practice, and gender and sexuality studies. His first book, Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art, was awarded the Charles C. Eldredge Prize for Outstanding Scholarship from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Art historian Richard Meyer is the author of Outlaw Representation: Censorship and Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century American Art. Richard Meyer: The figure in the foreground is holding up a billyclub or nightstick and the figure in the background is holding up his fist. And it's almost as though even though they're distanced from each other by the family they're engaged in some kind of combat or confrontation with each other. And what stands between. hat stands betwee. hem is the family. But the family does not look at each other.

  • Richard Meyer has added a significant volume to the compendium of books on American art and its kinship to social mores. Using Censorship as a topic should arouse the interest of all who value freedom of expression and it is to that audience that I think this books plays to best. Yes, the art examined here is queer art, but it is art that is a significant part of the 20th Century, not just an isolated school. His chosen artists are Paul Cadmus, Robert Mapplethorpe, Andy Warhol and Gran Fury and in presenting these artists he is concomittanly investigating the influence of such highly important social issues as AIDS, consumerism, POP culture, the whole Jesse Helms/Jerry Farwell/Christian Coalition debacle in a way that makes the reader look into the motivational behavior of the past century that continues into this century. The book is well documented in images and footnotes, making it a must for school libraries and fellow scholars. Despite the confrontational topic of the book, Meyer writes so well that he maintains interest even when extending his examples a bit too far. He overall theme appears to be that there is some good to be found in censorship: media attention derived from such art brings heightened awareness and eventually more prestige and longevity to the art and involved artists. One major complaint about this book: the typeface point is so small that it makes reading the pages a visual strain. In an otherwise expensive layout, one wonders why the typeface couldn't have been changed to one more user friendly.

  • Wonderful book to own. It covers a lot information everyone should read and know,

  • This book was purchased as an optional textbook for a class held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The class itself was a revelation in the way "Queer" art (read the book to get the actual definition of this term--it's probably not as limited to the familiar concept you may have run across) is perceived, as well as indicating the diversity of the Museum's holdings and approach to education. Political as well as artistic strategies are explored, and although not all artists practicing during the time frame of the book, which is considerable, are mentioned, the few that are introduced are given in-depth coverage. Big names that you think you might understand by this time are given fresh perspective and, if you're an art history buff as myself, further reasons to consider their output. This holds true for others you may be exploring on your own: insights from this book are easily transferred beyond its pages. I walked away from the book (and class) with more questions then when I first encountered it, and the inspiration is exciting. This volume will increase your awareness of art in society and its perception by some as beauty and others, menace. Lucid, knowledgeable: great read. NOTE: some graphic sexual images.

  • Professor Meyer's work is a needed contribution to queer theory and indespensible for anyone interested in minority persecution. As an art historian would, Meyer threads through the work of gay liberationist artists to demonstrate how the visual arts portrayed resistence to oppression. Using Foucault's concept of "reverse discourse" as a methodology, and the case study as a guide, this book reveals how public attitudes can be challenged with art. I look forward to more writing by Meyer.

  • This book does for twentieth-century American art what Vito Russo's "The Celluloid Closet" does for twentieth-century cinema. The illustrations and reproductions are brilliantly choreographed with the text.

  • This book is genius and amazing. Read it right now.

  • To judge from the glowing reviews by high-powered academics on the dustjacket, one might think that Richard Meyer's book would reshape the entire field of twentieth-century American art history. To his credit, Meyer has done extensive archival research, and gives elegant, concise descriptions of the visual material he presents. But when one ceases to be awed by the glossy, provocative photos, it becomes apparent that his book is 90% description and summary of paintings and events--really, a coffee-table book rather than academic scholarship--and that his "central claim," clearly outlined in the first few pages, isn't really a argument at all, but an observation about cause and effect, _Outlaw Representations_ argues that censorship has produced a set of unintended "representations and counter-representations." What exactly needs to be proven here?
    A much more interesting argument, in my view, would have been to say that representations of homosexuality in art and visual culture provide a paradigm for thinking about the relationship between censorship, desire, and the law. Apart from a few references to Freud and Jung (Lacan is conspicuously absent), Meyer does not venture in this direction. One cannot hold Meyer accountable for the title of his book, "Outlaw Representations,"--perhaps it was imposed upon him for marketing reasons, or chosen for its clever play on the word "out"--but it wrongly implies that these censored representations he is examining somehow seek to be "outside" of the law, when the artists are clearly eroticizing the very law that imposes censorial limits on their expression.
    The book is a disappointment, because Meyer is a very intelligent person, and could have done more theorizing to make his book truly exceptional.