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ePub Black Man's Grave: Letters From Sierra Leone download

by John Amman,Gary Stewart

ePub Black Man's Grave: Letters From Sierra Leone download
Author:
John Amman,Gary Stewart
ISBN13:
978-0979080821
ISBN:
0979080827
Language:
Publisher:
Cold Run Books; 1st edition (May 15, 2007)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1260 kb
Fb2 file:
1236 kb
Other formats:
mobi mbr docx azw
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
522

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians.

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians.

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians, the plundering of the country's diamonds, and the rise of the notorious Revolutionary United Front. Based on letters from villagers to the authors, both former Peace Corps Volunteers in Sierra Leone, the book exposes 'big man' Siaka Stevens, warlord Charles Taylor, and rebel leader Foday Sankoh. Gary Stewart began writing as a freelancer for London-based West Africa magazine and went on to contribute to, among others, Option, Folk Roots, The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, and, most frequently, The Beat.

Black Man's Grave book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Black Man's Grave: Letters from Sierra Leone as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Berkeley Springs, WV : Cold Run Books. afropop worldwide; audio music; radioprograms.

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians, the .

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians, the plundering of the country's diamonds, and the rise o. .By 1991 Sierra Leone was ripe for revolution; the Revolutionary United Front just didn't know how to pull it off. Meet the greedy politicians who hijacked Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy, the rebels who brought them down, and the villagers of Fadugu who struggled to survive the country's chaotic descent into civil war.

Co-author with Gary Stewart, BLACK MAN'S GRAVE: LETTERS FROM SIERRA LEONE, Cold Run Books . Exec Vice President, Sierra Leone Village Partnerships.

Co-author with Gary Stewart, BLACK MAN'S GRAVE: LETTERS FROM SIERRA LEONE, Cold Run Books, 2007 (ww. oldrunbooks. 1111/(ISSN)1743-4580). Trade Union Representative for AFL-CIO to Mexico (1992).

This book is a collection of letters written in Sierra Leone during the civil . The books are all written and illustrated by Sierra Leoneans.

This book is a collection of letters written in Sierra Leone during the civil war and together they depict many aspects of the suffering that took place Non-fiction. Non-fiction literature also plays an important role in the Sierra Leone society. Choice 4. (2007) : 174. ^ Kargbo, John Abdul.

Gary Stewart, John Amman. Was it really all about diamonds? Sierra Leone was ripe for revolution; the Revolutionary United Front just didn't know how to pull it off. show more.

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Uncle Jed's Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell. Uncle Jed, a black, itinerant barber in the pre-Depression South, dreams of opening his own shop.

Saved by. Jon Rupinski. Uncle Jed's Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell. He saves for years, and he finally starts his own business at age. One of the 1994 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award honor books was "Uncle Jed's Barbershop," illustrated by James Ransome and written by Margaree King Mitchell.

Black Man's Grave chronicles the hijacking of Sierra Leone's fledgling democracy by corrupt politicians, the plundering of the country's diamonds, and the rise of the notorious Revolutionary United Front. Based on letters from villagers to the authors, both former Peace Corps Volunteers in Sierra Leone, the book exposes 'big man' Siaka Stevens, warlord Charles Taylor, and rebel leader Foday Sankoh.
  • The African voices, via the letters from friendships established by the authors in their Peace Corps days, are authentic African points of view. Sadly, there is little to reflect progress for these families....some did not survive the warfare analyzed by the authors. I feel the book can only be recommended for motivated readers; it is probably best read with additional resources about Sierra Leone. I could not find the village of the book's title in the one map, although the general area is documented. Timelines, graphs of traditional tribal lineages, or family trees of extended kinships would be helpful aides for the book's considerable contents. The included photographs are exceptional for their inclusion of main characters in the context of their towns and villages, as well as the truck that typified the delivery business so important for both a family business and needed transportation.
    Although this book was listed by Amazon, with others in the category of "Peace Corps Memoirs", it is NOT like the 2015 published "My Heart Is Like a Cabbage" by Gerald David Mills or "Peace Corps, Sierra Leone & Me" by Norman Tyler. Both are thoughtful portrayals of the country with only hints of the conditions that lead to the devastating violence in the 1990s. "Black Man's Grave" is more a historical text with background about West Africa and the resources that could be extracted and eventually purchase weapons, by one powerful military leader after another.
    An easier read, but still carefully accurate, is journalist Tim Butcher's "Chasing the Devil On Foot Through Africa's Killing Fields", published 2010.

  • This book is used as a text book at several universities and for the Peace Corps entering Sierra Leone as an historical account of the 11 year war. Fortunately, because the complex (though very accurate) historical reporting by Stewart and Amman is interspersed with several eyewitness accounts by way of letters written from Sierra Leoneans, this is a fascinating and touching read. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in either history or looking for a harrowing true story of bravery.

  • According to urban gang expert David Kennedy it takes relatively few thugs to begin utterly terrorizing a neighborhood -- or, as Gary Stewart, John Amman, and their informants in Sierra Leone can testify, an entire country.

    Black Man's Grave is contemporary African history as viewed by a journalist and an academic, professionals whose assessments are deepened by a patina of nostalgia. Both Stewart and Amman were Peace Corps volunteers in Sierra Leone, and they mourn the imperfect paradise they knew from their work in the same northern village, Fadugu (which means in Mandingo, "a town where one is well fed"), where three ethnic groups converged more than a century ago and managed to co-exist and thrive. Rounding out their insights are letters from old Fadugu friends: teachers, agricultural technicians, and other citizens who somehow, but not always, survived Sierra Leone's genocidal 1992-2002 civil war.

    Evocatively written and carefully researched, Black Man's Grave can't really be done justice in a short review. Stewart and Ammans's combination of history and reportage, and the letters' poignantly matter-of-fact close-ups, take the reader from Sierra Leone's days as a refuge for former slaves through the nineteenth century, when regional chiefs cannily manipulated their British masters, into the last century of cultural progress and relative affluence. Sierra Leone was eventually devastated by greed, with the struggle to control its diamond mines resulting in mass killings and punitive mutilations, sexual violence, and the enslavement of child soldiers, a nightmare orchestrated by the country's rival leaders and neighboring Liberia's president Charles Taylor.

    A number of publishers inexplicably turned down Black Man's Grave, although declaring it "remarkable" (Thomas Dunne Books), "quite compelling" (Beacon Press), and "the kind of book [we'd] love to publish here" (Basic Books). The Special Court for Sierra Leone, set up jointly by the government of Sierra Leone and the United Nations, is now underway in The Hague, mandated to try Charles Taylor and other leaders for war crimes committed in Sierra Leone since November 30, 1996. As of this writing, Mr. Taylor's case is in the defense phase, so Black Man's Grave is a particularly timely read. Fifty percent of its profits will go to projects benefiting the people of Fadugu. -- Melanie Lawrence for the FEARLESS REVIEWS

  • This book is good enough that after reading a friend's copy, I ordered one. It's very, very well done. I struggled with the first two pages, which were a bit overwritten--like the author's were trying too hard, but once they settle into it, they tell a really good story. It's clear, strong, careful writing, complete without being tedious. I liked it very much. I'm not sure the letter construct really works. They're interesting but they don't exactly tell the story of the war. (The letters in Higbie's and Moigula's Sierra Leone: Inside the War are unbelievably good, and do a better job of capturing the chaos and complexity of the war.) But that's a nit. This is an excellent book.