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ePub A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization download

by Adrian Wooldridge,John Micklethwait

ePub A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization download
Author:
Adrian Wooldridge,John Micklethwait
ISBN13:
978-0812966800
ISBN:
0812966805
Language:
Publisher:
Random House Trade Paperbacks; Reprint edition (March 11, 2003)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1829 kb
Fb2 file:
1517 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
577

Now John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge weigh in with the response I prayed fo. A Future Perfect has taken up the challenge of translating the many aspects of globalization into human and understandable terms.

Now John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge weigh in with the response I prayed for. A Future Perfect fills a yawning void with a magisterial case for the most powerful-and on earth: globalization. It is a convincing, even-handed, often witty defense and will do much to clarify this often misunderstood "revolution" of the new century.

Also by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge THE WITCH DOCTORS: MAKING SENSE OF THE MANAGEMENT GURUS THEĀ . The company: a short history of a revolutionary idea.

Also by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge THE WITCH DOCTORS: MAKING SENSE OF THE MANAGEMENT GURUS THE COMPANY: A SHORT HISTORY OF A REVOLUTIONARY IDEA A Future Perfect A Future. The Challenge and Promise. and. Adrian Wooldridge. Random house trade paperbacks.

A Future Perfect book . The authors, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, correspondents for "The Economist," won the Financial Times/Booz Allen Hamilton Global Business Book Award on Strategy and Leadership for their previous A Future Perfect is the first comprehensive examination of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives.

A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization (2000).

He was formerly the 'Schumpeter' columnist. Until July 2009 he was The Economist's Washington Bureau Chief and the 'Lexington' columnist. Co-wrote (with fellow Economist journalist John Micklethwait): The Witch Doctors: Making Sense of the Management Gurus (1996). A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization (2000). The Company: A Short History of a Revolutionary Idea (2003). The Right Nation: Conservative Power in America (2004).

A Future Perfect: The Challenge and Promise of Globalization. A FUTURE PERFECT is the first comprehensive evaluation of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives. A FUTURE PERFECT is the first comprehensive evaluation of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives

John Micklethwait, Adrian Wooldridge.

John Micklethwait, Adrian Wooldridge. A Future Perfect is the first comprehensive examination of the most important revolution of our nd how it will continue to change our lives. He has won a Wincott Award for financial journalism. He has appeared on NPR and the BBC and written for the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, and The New York Times.

The Challenge and Promise of Globalization. The Challenge and Promise of Globalization. By John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge. Do businesses benefit from going global? Are we creating winner-take-all societies? Will globalization seal the triumph of junk culture? What will happen to individual careers?

Micklethwait, John; Wooldridge, Adrian. 1. The Fall and Rise of Globalization - pt.

Micklethwait, John; Wooldridge, Adrian. 2. The Three Engines of Globalization. Technology as Freedom. 5. Sex, Death, and the Welfare State - pt. 3. One World: The Business of Globalization. 6. The Five Myths of Globalization. 7. Managing in a Global Age - pt. 4. The Politics of Interdependence.

Having established their credibility when it comes to Ideas both global and revolutionary, they now double down with The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State.

amp; Wooldridge, Adrian. A future perfect : the challenge and hidden promise of globalization. and Wooldridge, Adrian. A future perfect : the challenge and hidden promise of globalization, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge Heinemann London 2000. Australian/Harvard Citation. amp; Wooldridge, Adrian.

A Future Perfect is the first comprehensive examination of the most important revolution of our time—globalization—and how it will continue to change our lives. Do businesses benefit from going global? Are we creating winner-take-all societies? Will globalization seal the triumph of junk culture? What will happen to individual careers? Gathering evidence worldwide, from the shantytowns of São Paolo to the boardrooms of General Electric, from the troubled Russia-Estonia border to the booming San Fernando Valley sex industry, John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge deliver an illuminating tour of the global economy and a fascinating assessment of its potential impact.
  • GLOBALIZATION is a process where people, things, ideas, capital and commerce is able to freely travel anywhere in the world. As a result, the notion of comparative advantages are becoming far more frequent. More people are exposed to competition than ever before, and this has been a good thing for most people (i.e., witness the cheaper and better American cars). Globalization has been very helpful in attacking the status quo -- entrenched, pesky bureacratic public sectors unions, who take their job as a right, not a privilage; getting workers to think more about productivity, since, if they do not succeed, operations can move elsewhere.
    Most important, I would say that globalization has reformed governments. As the book explains, there are still extremes on the left (Nader) and the right (Buchanan) who don't understand economics and are perfectly willing to harp on the same old course they've been on. But as this book explains, many governments are learning that they too are not immune from competition. Countries must open their borders up to foreign capital, privatize state services, come up with more flexible labor laws (i.e., France's radical law that forbids anyone from working more than 35-hours a week. However, without such a law, the average person in the U.S. works only 34 hours a week).
    I am even more excited about globalization after reading this book. It's very timely, written in the familiar prose found in The Economist, and well worth the money!

  • Despite the hyperbole of the title, John Micklethwait and Adrian Woodrige strive to make this a book that does not take on of the extreme positions on globalization -- IE, neither an attack on it, like One World Ready Or Not, nor a full on, pie-eyed endorsement, like The Lexus and The Olive Tree. This is kind of a head fake, because really they are pretty much in favor of liberalizing trade as much as possible. They acknowledge potential problems, but almost always explain them away with a pro-market argument. If you're a fan of the Economist (I am) you'll enjoy the book no matter what your views on globalization, because it's written with the smarts and humor of that magazine. It's also lucidly argued, and packed with solid research and interesting anecdotes collected from every corner of the planet, even if they do cut corners from time to time when the facts aren't going their way, and are kind of cavalier about the losers in globalization. The biggest blind spot -- and of course it's easy to say this with the benefit of hindsight -- is that the shrinking of the world via increased trade etc. is much more fragile than it seemed a couple of years ago. They do acknowledge this to some extent -- there's a lot of good historical examples sprinkled in -- but the current environment feels more like one of fragmentation than oneness. (The paperback version is worth picking because the new introduction at least deals with Sept. 11.) Nevertheless, A Future Perfect is a solid introduction to a topic that is still incredibly important.

  • Fans of the Economist, like myself, will likely enjoy this book; however, like The Economist, there are a few chapters that I had to struggle to get through.

    Globalization has been presented in the major news channels as the Outsourcing of Jobs, which is like judging a car by its cup holders. Only when the stock market turned bearish and Clinton moved out of office did I begin to hear so many complaints about global competition. So, this book is a welcome change from the usual rantings.

    I would hope for a later edition that explains more about the impact of electronic commerce on globalization, as well as an explanation of the international commodity markets as they work today.

    For a book that lacks charts and graphs, the process and wholesale impact of globalization is covered well and fairly.

  • You'll have to read "A Future Perfect: The Challenge and the Promise of Globalization" to find out. The authors examine the central forces behind the globalizing of the world's economy circa 2003, employing an analytical and cheeky style reminiscent of The Economist, the magazine for which they both write.

    Along the way, they check in with the haves and the have-nots at places as disparate as Silicon Valley, the Rust Belt, St. Petersburg, Hong Kong, and Tangier, and share cautionary tales from managers in industries as diverse as pornography, electric motors, and children's toys. They find reason to believe that the nation-state is not dead and that geography still matters, while listing factors that threaten to slow globalization and suggesting policies designed to ensure that the benefits of globalization flow to a greater number of people.

    A more sober take on where things are headed than "The Sovereign Individual" by James Dale Davidson and Lord Williams Rees-Mogg (see my review of that book).

  • Micklethwait and Wooldridge have written a crucial work on globalization, drawing from a wide array of current and recent events. It is hard to see the forest when you are in the midst of the trees, but these two lead the reader to reasonable perspectives about the current evolution of the world. Years of editing and reporting, under the aegis of the highly reputable British magazine, the Economist, has rendered they two young writers nothing short of wise at an early age. They write in general with more permanence than journalists do generally. Their inherent alienation from US precepts, as foreigners, makes their perspective on that country more vivid than one might expect. This book is essential equipment for the informed adult.