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ePub The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt download

by Shiraz Dossa

ePub The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt download
Author:
Shiraz Dossa
ISBN13:
978-0889209671
ISBN:
0889209677
Language:
Publisher:
Wilfrid Laurier University Press; First Edition edition (February 21, 1989)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1869 kb
Fb2 file:
1630 kb
Other formats:
lrf doc lit mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
810

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Start by marking The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Tracing the origins of this theory to Homer and Periclean Athens, Dossa underlines Arendt's unique contribution to reinventing the idea and the ideal of citizenship, reminding us that the public realm is the locus of friendship, community, identity, and in a certain sense, humanity. Arendt believes that no one who prefets his or her private interest to public affairs in the old sense can claim to be fully human or truly excellent.

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and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt

The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt. In this critical study, Shiraz Dossa argues that Arendt is a political theorist in the sense in which Aristotle is a theorist, and that the key to her political theory lies in the twin notions of the public realm and the public self. Tracing the origins of this theory to Homer and Periclean Athens, Dossa underlines Arendt’s unique contribution to reinventing the idea and the ideal of citizenship, reminding us that the public realm is the locus of friendship, community, identity, and in a certain sense, humanity.

Hannah Arendt and the Redemptive Power of Narrative. The Political Consequences of Thinking Gender and Judaism in the Work of Hannah Arendt. Treue Als Zeichen der Wahrheit" Hannah Arendt, Werk Und Wirkung : Dokumentationsband Zum Symposium. Alte Synagoge Essen - 1997. Vícios privados, prejuízos públicos. Jennifer Ring - 1997. The Hidden Philosophy of Hannah Arendt. Margaret Betz Hull - 2002 - Routledgecurzon. Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics. Craig Calhoun & John McGowan - 1997 - Univ of Minnesota Press.

the political and public realm (Pitkin, 1981). For Arendt, justice cannot be a key political value or principle because it necessarily deals with economic and social, not political, circumstances (Frazer, 2009). What is again at stake here is the separation of economics and politics. This paper considers the implications of Hannah Arendt's criticisms of Frantz Fanon and the theories of violence and politics associated with his influence for our understanding of the relationship between those two phenomena. Fanon argues that violence is a means necessary to political action, and also is an organic force or energy.

In this critical study, Shiraz Dossa argues that Arendt is a political theorist in the sense in which Aristotle is a theorist, and that the key to her political theory lies in the twin notions of the public realm and the public self. In this work, the author explains how Arendt’s unconventional and controversial views make sense on the terrain of her political theory.

Arendt’s split between public/private emotions and her reflections on. .

The political sphere in Arendt’s theory is exactly that place where people are able to speak with each other, and appear through their speech and actions in reality between them.

In his book The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt (Wilfrid Laurier . What Ahmadinejad has questioned is the mythologizing, the sacralization, of the Holocaust and the Zionist regime’s continued killing of Palestinians and Muslims.

In his book The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt (Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 1989) and in his articles, his focus has been the Holocaust and its legacy, Auschwitz and Christian conscience, Zionism and Palestinians, and Islam and the West. It would be a shocking event in any university. He has even raised doubts about the scale of the Holocaust. His rhetoric has been excessive and provocative.

Dossa, . The Public Realm and the Public Self: The Political Theory of Hannah Arendt (1989). Ettinger, . Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger (1995). Felder, D. The 100 Most Influential Women of All Time: A Ranking Past and Present (1996)

Dossa, . The 100 Most Influential Women of All Time: A Ranking Past and Present (1996). Gottsegen, M. The Political Thought of Hannah Arendt (1994). Hansen, P. Hannah Arendt: Politics, History and Citizenship (1993). Hinchman, L. P. and S. Hinchman, ed. Hannah Arendt: Critical Essays (1994).

Rehabilitates Arendt's reputation as a serious political theorist by looking afresh at her work. Hannah Arendt's work has been noted for its unorthodox and eclectic style.

From the time she set the intellectual world on fire with her reflections on Eichmann (1963), Hannah Arendt has been seen, essentially, as a literary commentator who had interesting things to say about political and cultural matters. In this critical study, Shiraz Dossa argues that Arendt is a political theorist in the sense in which Aristotle is a theorist, and that the key to her political theory lies in the twin notions of the “public realm” and the “public self”.

In this work, the author explains how Arendt’s unconventional and controversial views make sense on the terrain of her political theory. He shows that her judgement on thinkers, actors, and events as diverse as Plato, Marx, Machiavelli, Freud, Conrad, Hobbes, Hitler, the Holocaust, the French Revolution, and European colonialism flow directly from her political theory.

Tracing the origins of this theory to Homer and Periclean Athens, Dossa underlines Arendt’s unique contribution to reinventing the idea and the ideal of citizenship, reminding us that the public realm is the locus of friendship, community, identity, and in a certain sense, humanity. Arendt believes that no one who prefets his or her private interest to public affairs in the old sense can claim to be fully human or truly excellent.