mostraligabue
» » Labor Relations in China's Socialist Market Economy: Adapting to the Global Market

ePub Labor Relations in China's Socialist Market Economy: Adapting to the Global Market download

by Sheila Oakley

ePub Labor Relations in China's Socialist Market Economy: Adapting to the Global Market download
Author:
Sheila Oakley
ISBN13:
978-1567205893
ISBN:
1567205895
Language:
Publisher:
Praeger (November 30, 2002)
Subcategory:
Politics & Government
ePub file:
1125 kb
Fb2 file:
1710 kb
Other formats:
azw txt docx mbr
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
413

Ideological and cultural factors do not define or influence the way labor relations are conducted in China's workplace, as many suppose they do.

Ideological and cultural factors do not define or influence the way labor relations are conducted in China's workplace, as many suppose they do. Oakley shows that the impact of the global market has significantly altered the way labor relations are actually practiced in China, which follows what she calls a global market paradigm. Nevertheless, Maoism and Confucianism continue to influence labor relations in China, and the ideological and cultural remnants still to be found could affect China's relations with other nations for years to come.

Электронная книга "Labor Relations in China's Socialist Market Economy: Adapting to the Global Market", Sheila Oakley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Labor Relations in China's Socialist Market Economy: Adapting to the Global Market" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The recent round of debate over China's state and private economy has fundamentally touched upon whether or not China should abandon or strengthen the socialist elements within the market economy. In this paper, we argue that the debate is, in essence, a continued class struggle in the political and ideological superstructure. Then we discuss the foreseeable future of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) under current political and economic conditions. We will further propose the necessary reforms for the SOEs to move towards a truly socialist form of public ownership.

The socialist market economy (SME) is the economic model employed by the . "The Role of Planning in China's Market Economy". Archived from the original (PDF) on 28 August 2009.

The socialist market economy (SME) is the economic model employed by the People's Republic of China. It is based on a predominant state-owned sector within an open market economy originating in the Chinese economic reforms introduced under Deng Xiaoping. Proponents of the socialist market economy compare it to the New Economic Policy in Soviet Russia that introduced market-oriented reforms while maintaining state-ownership of the 'commanding heights' of the economy. Retrieved 7 September 2010.

Oakley shows that the impact of the global market has significantly altered the way labor relations are .

Oakley shows that the impact of the global market has significantly altered the way labor relations are actually practiced in China, which follows what she calls a global market paradigm.

The socialist market economy (SME) is the economic system and model of economic development employed in the People's Republic of China. The system is based on the predominance of public ownership and state-owned enterprises within a market economy. The term "socialist market economy" was introduced by Jiang Zemin during the 14th National Congress of the Communist Party of China in 1992 to describe the goal of China's economic reforms.

Despite a liberalizing global economy, nations retain distinctive labor-market institutions such as human resource practices, labor unions, and regulatory . Frege and Kelly have made a valuable and timely contribution to the field.

Despite a liberalizing global economy, nations retain distinctive labor-market institutions such as human resource practices, labor unions, and regulatory regimes. It is incisive, timely, and well organized.

China has socialist market economy in place (People's Daily Online, 2005). "Reform of China's State-owned Enterprises A Progress Report of Oxford Analytica". The reforms are justified through the belief that changing conditions necessitate new strategies for socialist development. According to Li Rongrong in 2003, chairman of the State-Owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of the State Council

and Chinese officials announced a limited agreement to halt the trade war between the countries, with President Trump removing the threat of new tariffs on China and Beijing agreeing to purchases of American farm goods and other products.

Ideological and cultural factors do not define or influence the way labor relations are conducted in China's workplace, as many suppose they do. Oakley shows that the impact of the global market has significantly altered the way labor relations are actually practiced in China, which follows what she calls a global market paradigm. Nevertheless, Maoism and Confucianism continue to influence labor relations in China, and the ideological and cultural remnants still to be found could affect China's relations with other nations for years to come. Instead of taking a macro-level, industrial-relations approach common to other studies of Chinese labor, Oakley provides an in-depth look at the problems emerging on the shop floor, in the wake of economic reform. She provides translations of actual case histories, each of which details the causes of disputes, the various methods that were found to resolve them, and their eventual outcomes. At a broader level of analysis, her book tends to support convergence theories, of which globalization is the latest, proving that there are other features in contemporary market labor relations that have emerged in China in direct response to the demands of global competition. The result is a superbly detailed examination of a topic too little covered and seldom well understood.

Oakley begins by considering the features of market labor relations and the emergence of a globalization-friendly style, in both Western and Asian economics. She continues with an analysis of the ideological and cultural dimensions of the relationship between managers and managed. In the next three chapters, she discusses the causes, resolution methods, and labor dispute outcomes. In each case she refers to the evidence of market, Maoist, and Confucian influences. The conclusion she draws is that while Confucian ideas and traces of Maoism continue to have an impact on the development and resolution of labor disputes in post-reform China overall, Chinese labor relations conform to the demands of the global, not the provincial, marketplace.