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ePub The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan download

by Carmen Blacker

ePub The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan download
Author:
Carmen Blacker
ISBN13:
978-0043980064
ISBN:
0043980066
Language:
Publisher:
George Allen & Unwin; 3rd edition (1989)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1114 kb
Fb2 file:
1226 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
938

This classic work describes shamanic figures surviving in Japan today, their initiatory dreams, ascetic practices. While it sounds like a dull thing to say, "The Catalpa Bow" really is a pivotal work in the study of Japanese religion

This classic work describes shamanic figures surviving in Japan today, their initiatory dreams, ascetic practices. While it sounds like a dull thing to say, "The Catalpa Bow" really is a pivotal work in the study of Japanese religion. Blacker is investigating.

The Catalpa Bow book. This classic work describes shamanic figures surviving in Japan today, their initiatory dreams, ascetic practices, the supernatural beings with whom they communicate, and the geography of the other world in myth and legend.

Mobile version (beta). The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan (Japan Library Classics). Download (pdf, . 3 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

In Japan, a few studies concerning the KP have been done. Many scholars have noted to the resemblance between the 48 praņidhānas of Dharmākara bodhisattva in Sukh and almost all the 48 praņidhānas of Rājan Araņemin in the KP. Although such comparisons have been made intensively, studies from other standpoints have not been sufficient. I CANNOT send a copy of this book, if requested.

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One of the absolute 'must read' books on Japanese religious practice.

This classic work describes shamanic figures surviving in Japan today, their initiatory dreams, ascetic practices, the supernatural beings with whom they communicate, and the geography of the other world in myth and legend. One of the absolute 'must read' books on Japanese religious practice. It is also essential reading for those interested in asceticism, shamanism and spirit possession in general. Ian Reader, Culture and Religion

Religious Studies 13 (3):374-375 (1977). Similar books and articles. Carmen Blacker Evenki Shamanistic Practices in Soviet Present and Ethnographic Present Perfect.

Religious Studies 13 (3):374-375 (1977). The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan. Evenki Shamanistic Practices in Soviet Present and Ethnographic Present Perfect. Nikolai SsorinChaikov - 2001 - Anthropology of Consciousness 12 (1):1-18. Yasushi Maruyama & Tetsu Ueno - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):438-447. Japanese Educational Reform: A Genealogy of the Construction of the Student. Jie Qi - 2001 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison. Bu kitaba önizleme yap . Kullanıcılar ne diyor? - Eleştiri yazın. Her zamanki yerlerde hiçbir eleştiri bulamadık.

The Catalpa Bow: a Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan, 1975; 1986; 1999. Ancient Cosmologies, 1975. Divination and Oracles, 1981. The Straw Sandal, a 2008 translation of a novel by Santō Kyōden. This book, which has an introduction by Michael Loewe titled 'Carmen Blacker - Friend, Scholar and Wife', was launched on 5 December 2016 at the Society of Antiquaries of London, where Blacker was a Fellow. The book also has diary excerpts and some key unpublished work. a b Carmen Blacker FBA Archived December 8, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.

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Shipped from UK, please allow 10 to 21 business days for arrival. A good, clean & sound copy, with photographic plates.
  • I bought this on a whim, with pretty much no pre-existing knowledge of Japanese religion except for general knowledge about Buddhism and the knowledge that Shintoism existed. Even with this background, I found this book to be fascinating and well-done. A tad hard at times, but still one of the more readable books with this amount of knowledge behind it I have ever read. It's a very, very good look at how religion and superstition actually existed in practice in pre-modern Japan. If that's the kind of thing you enjoy, you'll love it. If not, well, you won't.

  • I was lucky to find this one....gets into a lot of the details I wanted and breaks down the areas and practices. Even though I did not find everything I needed in it, one rarely does, it has lead to other places of course where I might find the other info I need. ....great pics too!

  • This is a portrayal of an extinct world with an extinct methodology. It's an extremely Eliadean book, by which I mean that it's written by a foreign outsider in mourning for the loss of an enchanted world. As such it would come under attack by modern religionists for "romanticizing." I have not seen such an attack on this book but similar books, as well as Eliade's approach generally, have been severely attacked in such a way. But there are surely worse things in the world than romanticism. So, feel free to get sucked into this portrayal of a world disappearing in the author's time and now basically vanished; there is plenty of good material in it and many mystical anecdotes, including the hair-raising tale of "sword climbing".

  • While it sounds like a dull thing to say, "The Catalpa Bow" really is a pivotal work in the study of Japanese religion. One of the few English-language titles to address the phenomenon of Japanese shamanism at all, it also played a vanguard role in questioning and transcending the sort of neat and tidy distinctions between "Buddhism" and "Shinto" that had rather handicapped prior scholarship on the subject--or at least unhelpfully distorted characterizations and treatments of the kind of lived religion Carmen Blacker is investigating. It is mainly for this that the book is often cited approvingly, but this stance is not so much a conclusion as a precondition opening up previously inaccessible dimensions of Japanese religiosity to our fascinated scrutiny.

    As one might suspect, a strong anthropological impulse governs the general tenor of the study. Interviews with shamanistic practitioners along with first-hand (and second-hand) eyewitness accounts of rituals, ceremonies, and exorcisms are given center stage in a manner very refreshing to anyone kind of tired of academic titles that bend a poverty of content to analytical overkill. And yet the overflowing pandemonium of rich detail to be found herein is organized with a light but sure touch through an ongoing development of definitions and categories (more typical of a "history of religions" approach) so that the whole thing, rather than spinning out of control into a mélange of folkloristic footnotes, takes on comprehensible form that can actually be retained in one's memory afterwards without betraying the dispersion of geographic and historical specificity bridged thereby.

    What one might not suspect is that there's a deeply elegiac undertone to this book as well. Many of these religious practices were in the process of dying out and vanishing or else ossifying into tourist spectacles even as Blacker was doing her fieldwork in the 1960's and early '70's, and, while this is one of the only books to touch upon the kind of religiosity I experienced in rural Japan in the 1990's at all, this sad and yet perhaps inevitable process has clearly continued unabated since then. Sometimes this leads the author to rely on literary works as additional evidence, which can be an iffy proposition in and of itself--and some of the passages where Blacker extrapolates what medieval Japanese shamans "must certainly" have been thinking and doing based on stray passages in Noh plays, fictional monogatari, and temple miracle tales are a bit weak as a result. On the other hand, the book would have felt incomplete if these potential sources had been passed over in silence. The same sort of goes for references to folklorists like Yanagita Kunio and Origuchi Shinobu; their contribution to theories of Japanese cultural essentialism should give one pause, but in tracking an elusive subject like Japanese shamanism can one afford to decline the data they bring to the table?

    In any case, such considerations are trumped by Blacker's wonderfully narrated observations, which tilt the book towards being as much a priceless and possibly timeless classic as a pivotally significant study. The unusually extensive treatment of the Shugendo and Nichiren traditions found within these pages also render this book pretty unique in the field. And if you have a taste for the "wondrous strange" then you'll probably find the book every bit as interesting as I did.

  • I expected to skim this book only, but found it fascinating from start to finish. I lived in Japan for a couple of years in the 1950s and found it shed light on goings-on that I witnessed but scarcely understood. The author's comments on religious developments afterWW2 were most interesting. Japan is becoming so westernized that the information she captured between the covers of her book will be increasingly valuable as time goes on. It's a remarkable accomplishment.