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ePub Irish Fairy Legends (Celtic, Irish) download

by T. Crofton Croker

ePub Irish Fairy Legends (Celtic, Irish) download
Author:
T. Crofton Croker
ISBN13:
978-0486468143
ISBN:
0486468143
Language:
Publisher:
Dover Publications (November 24, 2008)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1843 kb
Fb2 file:
1630 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
760

Irish Fairy Legends (Celt. has been added to your Cart. Folklorist T. Crofton Croker roamed southern Ireland from 1812 to 1816, collecting authentic tales of fairies, changelings, pixies, and other supernatural creatures. Series: Celtic, Irish.

Irish Fairy Legends (Celt.

A rich reflection of Celtic culture, Irish Fairy Legends will entertain you and your family for generations. Irish Fairy Legends - T. Crofton Croker. The Legend of Knocksheogowna. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Dover : Apr 4, 2012ISBN: 9780486119403Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. The Mermaid's Prophecy and Other Stories: Magical Creatures, A Weiser Books Collection. Come sit by the fire - a world of enchantment awaits you in this treasury of classic Irish stories by folklorist T. From 1812 to 1816, he roamed southern Ireland, listening to his countrymen's stories of pixies, leprechauns, and other supernatural creatures. The result is one of the first collections of Irish fairy tales on record - and it's often considered the finest.

Irish Fairy Legends b. Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland by. T.

Irish Fairy Legends by. Format Paperback 240 pages.

Irish fairy lore has influenced many Anglo-Irish authors, such as Jonathan Swift, whose celebrated book Gulliver's Travels . Croker, Thomas Crofton (1825)

Irish fairy lore has influenced many Anglo-Irish authors, such as Jonathan Swift, whose celebrated book Gulliver's Travels contains creatures akin to Irish fairies. Seán Ó Súilleabháin (1903–1996) and the Irish Folklore Commission. Croker, Thomas Crofton (1825). Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland vol. 1 London: John Murray, Retrieved from Oxford University Library via Archive. Croker, Thomas Crofton (1828). 2 London: John Murray, Retrieved from Oxford University Library via Archive.

The collection of Celtic folk-tales began in IRELAND as early as 1825, with T. Crofton Croker’s Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland

The collection of Celtic folk-tales began in IRELAND as early as 1825, with T. Crofton Croker’s Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland. This contained some 38 anecdotes of the first class mentioned above, anecdotes showing the belief of the Irish peasantry in the existence of fairies, gnomes, goblins, and the like. The Grimms did Croker the honour of translating part of his book, under the title of Irische Elfenmärchen

According to legend, this fairy is capable of looking into its head and seeing the home of a dying person

Although dozens of nations have fairy folklore, Ireland has one of the strongest traditions. Contrary to what you may have heard, there is no linear path regarding tracing the development of fairy folklore in Ireland; or indeed in any other part of the world. According to legend, this fairy is capable of looking into its head and seeing the home of a dying person. In a rather macabre twist, the Dullahan uses a human spine as a whip!

Many of these stories are from books which are archived at this site; some are from books which have yet to be converted to etext or now-rare source material. He selected many of the best (and often funniest) tales from other writers such as Lady Wilde, Croker, Lover, Hyde, and Carelton. Yeats wrote introductory material and notes to many of these stories.

According to Irish legend, Fairy Rings are the location of gateways into the fairy kingdom. The physical appearance of a circle of mushrooms or flowers are commonly found throughout the Emerald Isle. Folklore states that a fairy ring appears where a Lepre. Magick Book Witchcraft Books Occult Books Good Books Books To Read Paganism Wiccan Pagan Witch Witches. Magick of Faerie by Cassandra Eason.

Come sit by the fire — a world of enchantment awaits you in this treasury of classic Irish stories by folklorist T. Crofton Croker. From 1812 to 1816, he roamed southern Ireland, listening to his countrymen's stories of pixies, leprechauns, and other supernatural creatures. The result is one of the first collections of Irish fairy tales on record — and it's often considered the finest. Told in plain but colorful language with charming illustrations that capture the wonder of these tales, it became an overnight bestseller. An engaging mix of darkness and humor, the thirty-eight stories are filled to the brim with Irish wit and magic. In "The Haunted Cellar," you'll meet one of Ireland's oldest families, with blood as thick as buttermilk and a reputation for hospitality. But what is the secret in Justin Mac Carthy’s wine cellar that forces every butler to quit? In "The Changeling," a new mother finds a just solution when her infant is replaced by a mischievous fairy. "The Legend of Knockfierna" teaches fearless Carroll O'Daly a hard lesson about interfering with the "little people." And that's just a taste of the delights inside. A rich reflection of Celtic culture, Irish Fairy Legends will entertain you and your family for generations.
  • I first learned of T. Crofton Crocker by reading a collection of Celtic Folk and Fairy Tales by William Butler Yeats. Irish Fairy Legends,so far,is full of well collected treasures from the oral tradition. I have read that it is one of the most valued and most representative of the oral tradition of this region. I am glad to have discovered it!

  • I'm a first generation Irish American so choosing to read tales of fairies is a thing for me to do. I enjoyed reading of the legends surrounding fairies in Ireland. It is a very enjoyable read and reminded me of tales my father told to me as a young child.