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ePub X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent (Indigenous Americas) download

by Scott Richard Lyons

ePub X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent (Indigenous Americas) download
Author:
Scott Richard Lyons
ISBN13:
978-0816666768
ISBN:
0816666768
Language:
Publisher:
Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (May 10, 2010)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1825 kb
Fb2 file:
1240 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
686

Scott Richard Lyons (Ojibwe/Dakota) is assistant professor of English at Syracuse University, where he teaches indigenous and American literatures. He has also taught at Leech Lake Tribal College, the University of North Dakota, and Concordia College, Moorhead

Scott Richard Lyons (Ojibwe/Dakota) is assistant professor of English at Syracuse University, where he teaches indigenous and American literatures. He has also taught at Leech Lake Tribal College, the University of North Dakota, and Concordia College, Moorhead. The author of numerous critical and scholarly essays (including Rhetorical Sovereignty: What Do American Indians Want from Writing? ), he is also a personal essayist and frequent contributor to newspapers such as Indian Country Today and Star Tribune (Minneapolis–St. He has worked with grassroots organizations on issues ranging.

Similar books to X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent (Indigenous Americas). Scott Richard Lyons (Ojibwe/Dakota) is assistant professor of English at Syracuse University, where he teaches indigenous and American literatures. Kindle (5th Generation).

Scott Richard Lyons (Ojibwe/Dakota) is assistant professor of English at Syracuse University, where he teaches indigenous and American . X-marks: Native Signatures of Assent Indigenous Americas (Том 34). Автор.

Scott Richard Lyons (Ojibwe/Dakota) is assistant professor of English at Syracuse University, where he teaches indigenous and American literatures.

Lyons does a great job of breaking down the arguments he's grappling with, and really makes challenging claims about sovereignty, nationalism, and policing.

Lyons, Scott Richard. X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent. Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P, 2010. Ed. Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Kei Matsuda. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2010.

Native Signatures of Assent. In X-Marks, Scott Richard Lyons explores the complexity of contemporary Indian identity and current debates among Indians about traditionalism, nationalism, and tribalism. Author: Scott Richard Lyons. Employing the x-mark as a metaphor for what he calls the Indian assent to the new, Lyons offers a valuable alternative to both imperialist concepts of assimilation and nativist notions of resistance, calling into question the binary oppositions produced during the age of imperialism and maintaining that indigeneity is something that people do, not what they are.

In X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent, Scott Richard Lyons offers a timely corrective to the excesses of traditionalist scholarship within Native American studies

In X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent, Scott Richard Lyons offers a timely corrective to the excesses of traditionalist scholarship within Native American studies. For Lyons, the field’s central concepts-identity, culture, and nation-are too often deployed in ways that promote an ahistorical and essentialist understanding of indigeneity. This fetishistic adherence to tradition demonizes the adoption of modern practices; for traditionalists, modernization is synonymous with assimilation. Lyons contests this reductive equivalency by arguing that change is fundamental to Native traditions.

Back to Our Shelves . X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent (Indigenous Americas)

Back to Our Shelves . X-Marks: Native Signatures of Assent (Indigenous Americas). by Scott Richard Lyons. Author Scott Richard Lyons Publisher Univ Of Minnesota Press Publication Date 2010-05-10 Section Native American. Type New Format Paperback ISBN 9780816666775. These x-marks indicated coercion (because the treaties were made under unfair conditions), resistance (because they were often met with protest), and acquiescence (to both a European modernity and the end of a particular moment of Indian history and identity).

In X-Marks, Scott Richard Lyons explores the complexity of contemporary Indian identity and current debates among Indians about traditionalism, nationalism . Series: Indigenous Americas.

In X-Marks, Scott Richard Lyons explores the complexity of contemporary Indian identity and current debates among Indians about traditionalism, nationalism, an. .

X-Marks : Native Signatures of Assent. By (author) Scott Richard Lyons. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, North American Indian leaders commonly signed treaties with the European powers and the American and Canadian governments with an X, signifying their presence and assent to the terms. These x-marks indicated coercion (because the treaties were made under unfair conditions), resistance (because they were often met with protest), and acquiescence (to both a European modernity and the end of a particular moment of Indian history and identity). In X-Marks, Scott Richard Lyons explores the complexity of contemporary Indian identity and current debates among Indians about traditionalism, nationalism, and tribalism. Employing the x-mark as a metaphor for what he calls the “Indian assent to the new,” Lyons offers a valuable alternative to both imperialist concepts of assimilation and nativist notions of resistance, calling into question the binary oppositions produced during the age of imperialism and maintaining that indigeneity is something that people do, not what they are. Drawing on his personal experiences and family history on the Leech Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota, discourses embedded in Ojibwemowin (the Ojibwe language), and disagreements about Indian identity within Native American studies, Lyons contends that Indians should be able to choose nontraditional ways of living, thinking, and being without fear of being condemned as inauthentic. Arguing for a greater recognition of the diversity of Native America, X-Marks analyzes ongoing controversies about Indian identity, addresses the issue of culture and its use and misuse by essentialists, and considers the implications of the idea of an Indian nation. At once intellectually rigorous and deeply personal, X-Marks holds that indigenous peoples can operate in modern times while simultaneously honoring and defending their communities, practices, and values.
  • Very good if you want to study native history, well written and thorough. Interesting, covers a broad range of topics.

  • This was really an amazing and challenging read that I know I will go back to! Lyons does a great job of breaking down the arguments he's grappling with, and really makes challenging claims about sovereignty, nationalism, and policing. This is really great stuff I'll be grappling with in my teaching in the future and also gives me so much more to read and consider!

  • Interesting look on what it is to be a Native American in modern times. I found more than a few things within this book to be very eye opening. It gave me a refreshed look on many different perspectives on life within a single community.

    That being said this book felt like it was assigned for a class. I probably would not have enjoyed it if I had bought it for my own leisure reading. It's informative but not captivating.