mostraligabue
» » Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure

ePub Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure download

by Reyna Green,John W. Troutman,Richard Green

ePub Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure download
Author:
Reyna Green,John W. Troutman,Richard Green
ISBN13:
978-0806137544
ISBN:
0806137541
Language:
Publisher:
Chickasaw Press (February 13, 2006)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1676 kb
Fb2 file:
1985 kb
Other formats:
docx txt rtf mobi
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
107

Richard Green has served since 1994 as a tribal historian for the Chickasaw Nation. Richard Green's writing is clear and consistently contextualized. Through Te Ata's story, he weaves life into the long and complicated history of Indians in North America.

Richard Green has served since 1994 as a tribal historian for the Chickasaw Nation.

John W. Troutman is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette.

by. Green, Richard (Richard Walter). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Trent University Library Donation.

Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited. Publisher: Chickasaw Press (January 25, 2016). Publication Date: January 25, 2016.

Reyna Green (Afterword). John W. Troutman (Afterword). Richard Green’s beautifully written biography of Te In 1987, Te Ata (1895–1995) became the first person ever declared an Oklahoma Treasure. In 1987, Te Ata (1895–1995) became the first person ever declared an Oklahoma Treasure. Throughout a sixty-year career, her performances of American Indian folklore enchanted a wide variety of audiences, from European royalty to Americans of all ages, and Indians from across the American continents from Canada to Peru.

In 1987, Te Ata (1895-1995) became the first person ever declared an "Oklahoma Treasure.

Items related to Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller - American Treasure . Richard Green has served since 1994 as a tribal historian for the Chickasaw Nation.

Items related to Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller - American Treasure:. ISBN 13: 9781935684336. TROUTMAN National Museum of American History

JOHN W. TROUTMAN National Museum of American History. Smithsonian Institution NMAH 4212, MRC 616. . Box 37012 Washington, DC 20013-7012. Green, Rayna, and John W. Troutman, Afterword, Te Ata, Chickasaw Storyteller, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press (2002).

Green, Richard G. (1995). Crossing Paths: Te Ata and Eleanor Roosevelt in the Twenties and Thirties". Te Ata Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma press. Morgan, Phillip Carroll; Parker, Judy Goforth. Journal of Chickasaw History.

Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller American Treasure by Richard Green . Captain Charles Stuart: Anglo-American Abolitionist by Anthony Barker.

Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller American Treasure by Richard Green: Used.

In 1987, Te Ata (1895–1995) became the first person ever declared an “Oklahoma Treasure.” Throughout a sixty-year career, her performances of American Indian folklore enchanted a wide variety of audiences, from European royalty to Americans of all ages, and Indians from across the American continents from Canada to Peru.

Richard Green’s beautifully written biography of Te Ata is based on extensive research in the artist’s personal papers, memorabilia, and the letters and photographs exchanged between Te Ata and her husband, Clyde Fisher.

  • Te Ata is a modern Chickasaw hero. A beautiful woman who represented American Indians to people all over the world.

  • Love it.

  • Great read. Richard Green does a fantastic job putting TeAta's life together.

  • Should be in the history books - she's a positive role model for native Americans!

  • I LOVE THIS BOOK , AS SHE IS MY' WAY BACK ' COUSIN .

  • The following is a review that I had written for a CUNY School of Law, Native American Law course of Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure, written by Richard Green. I hope that it might be helpful for some readers and I hope that it serves as a thank you letter to the author's magnificent work:

    Te Ata: Chickasaw Storyteller, American Treasure, written by Richard Green, is the product of over four years of research into the life and letters of Te Ata (born Mary Thompson), a woman who forwent a promising acting career in order to cultivate a profession as a Native American folklorist. Te Ata was born in 1895 and lived just thirty-eight days shy of her hundredth birthday. As a young performer, she took on the name "Te Ata," which she understood to mean "Bearer of the Dawn" in Chickasaw. She spent her nearly century-long life researching the history of the indigenous people of both North and South America and integrating that history into her performance art. Those who saw her perform were repeatedly astounded by her grace and strength. One friend called her "the spirit of the beauty of her race, intense as a flame, splendid as the wind-swept plumes of the eagle."

    If I am honest, I originally picked up the book while traveling in Oklahoma because I was transfixed by the black and white cover photograph -- a woman with high cheekbones and gleaming straight hair, wearing a collar which sloped gently down a strong yet lithe frame, bearing an expression of mild arrogance and proud femininity. I mention this because in reading this book, I was continually challenged as to whether Te Ata's magnetism, athleticism and profound beauty contributed to the quiet absolution of the past and pending sins of those Americans (and eventually Europeans) who watched her perform. It is undeniable that Te Ata was a mesmerizing performer and artist. Her lyricism translates in both her interviews, "My cathedral is the great out of doors," as well as in her letters to her husband, "The maple trees are uncurling their tender red leaves and the elms are a vivid yellow." However, as I read through the legions of high-profile politicians and elite socialites that invited her to their affairs, (most notably, perhaps, Theodore and Eleanor Roosevelt), I am unable to come to terms with the historical situation of Indians at the time, and what for me amounts to the hand-washing of serious socio-political reform. In other words, notwithstanding the high degree of intellect and art that Te Ata produced, I believe that her non-threatening and entrancing beauty contributed to her great success and in some ways, exotified and mystified her Native origins.

    In fact, Te Ata's own life is full of compelling and complicated contradictions. Although extremely humble and diffident, as a performer, Te Ata took on the title of "Princess." She spent no time living out of doors, but likewise owned no chairs in her apartment to "return to the floor culture of [her] people." She traveled extensively to learn about the traditions of other tribes, but most of her knowledge of Chickasaw history was derived from communications and research with the Smithsonian Institute. She promoted "full-blood" marriages, but married a non-Native scientist, Clyde Fisher, best known for his extensive contributions to the formation New York's American Museum of Natural History, as well as the founding of its planetarium.

    The book's historical breadth is expansive and follows Te Ata from girlhood to old age, from Bloomfield Academy, a Chickasaw boarding school, to her induction to both the Chickasaw Hall of Fame, as well as her appointment as the first declared "Oklahoma Treasure." Richard Green's writing is clear and consistently contextualized. Through Te Ata's story, he weaves life into the long and complicated history of Indians in North America. His research is unbelievably expansive and quite laudable. Te Ata is a woman with inconsistencies and passions, a woman with emotions that withdraw and emotions that expand. But what she did with her life is both exceptionally brave and indispensible. In Te Ata's words, "The Anglo-Saxon smashed the culture of any primitive people that got in the way, and then with loving care picked up the pieces and placed them in a museum." And in her own way, Te Ata took some of that history back.

    As an addendum, I would unequivocally recommend this book. Te Ata is an extremely compelling person and her relationship with her Native culture, as well as with White America, is absolutely fascinating. I have had numerous rich conversations about the book with friends, and it has triggered my awareness to countless other Native folklorists and the stories that they lived and the stories that they told.

  • Let us give praise and thanks to Richard Green for telling this story. Let us be proud of Te Ata and her life example. Let us hope for more Te Ata's. Highly recommended with no reservations (pun intended).

  • Richard Green has captured the spirit of independence and the Native American in this fabulous collection of pages from Te Ata's diary and notes from her husband Clyde Fisher.