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ePub The Jesus Dynasty: The Hidden History of Jesus, His Royal Family, and the Birth of Christianity download

by James D. Tabor

ePub The Jesus Dynasty: The Hidden History of Jesus, His Royal Family, and the Birth of Christianity download
Author:
James D. Tabor
ISBN13:
978-0739475089
ISBN:
0739475088
Language:
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster (2006)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1563 kb
Fb2 file:
1504 kb
Other formats:
lit txt rtf mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
455

James Tabor stands out among his generation of biblical scholars for his thorough familiarity with the full range of. .The movement as led by James and the brothers and relatives of Jesus, in and around Judea and the Galilee.

James Tabor stands out among his generation of biblical scholars for his thorough familiarity with the full range of textual evidence from the first centuries, his extensive experience with archaeological excavations, and his imagination and creativity. Tabor has a remarkable ability to discern the contours of vital religious movements from the scattered bits and pieces of evidence that survive from antiquity. And the one led by Paul, to non-Jews, in Greek speaking lands. Paul’s version was hostile to Judaism and on the ascent when the gospels were written.

After Jesus' death, his brother James took over the titular family dynasty. James championed a version of the faith quite different from Paul's, and, although James was more faithful to Jesus' original teachings, Paul's Christianity won. Tabor not only challenges Christian dogma, he also makes some assumptions with which not all scholars will agree: he places a great deal of emphasis on the hypothetical text Q, calling it "our most authentic early Christian document.

The Jesus Dynasty book. It is difficult to find good material on the history of Jesus that is not laced with didactic case-making or atheistic case-breaking. James Tabor, however, present the what mankind knows about 1st Century Israel and the life of Jesus from a scholarly perspective based on archaeological data and not mythology.

In The Jesus Dynasty, biblical scholar James Tabor brings us closer than ever to the historical Jesus. He sheds new light on Jesus' relationship with John the Baptizer, the role played by his brother James, and how Paul's ministry transformed Jesus' message, into what would become Christianity. James Tabor has studied the earliest surviving documents of Christianity for more than thirty years. He reconstructs for us the movement that sought the spiritual, social, and political redemption of the Jews, a movement led by one family

The Jesus Dynasty is a book written by James Tabor in which he develops the hypothesis that the original Jesus movement was a dynastic one, with the intention of overthrowing the rule of Herod Antipas.

The Jesus Dynasty is a book written by James Tabor in which he develops the hypothesis that the original Jesus movement was a dynastic one, with the intention of overthrowing the rule of Herod Antipas; that Jesus of Nazareth was a royal messiah, while his cousin John the Baptist planned to be a priestly messiah.

In The Jesus Dynasty, biblical scholar James Tabor brings us closer than ever . This is a book that will change our understanding of one of the most crucial moments in history. Jesus, as we know, was the son of Mary, a young woman who became pregnant before her marriage to a man named Joseph. Breaking with James and the followers of Jesus in Jerusalem, Paul preached a message based on his own revelations, which would become Christianity. Jesus became a figure whose humanity was obscured; John became merely a forerunner of Jesus; and James and the others were all but forgotten.

His reconstruction of the life of Jesus and his followers, and of the early . The Legacy of the Jesus Dynasty18.

His reconstruction of the life of Jesus and his followers, and of the early years of Christianity, will change our understanding of one of the most crucial moments in history.

The Jesus Dynasty: The Hidden History of Jesus, His Royal Family, and the Birth of Christianity.

The Jesus Dynasty offers a startling new interpretation of the life of Jesus and the origins of Christianity that is grounded in.In The Jesus Dynasty, biblical scholar James Tabor brings us closer than ever to the historical Jesus.

The Jesus Dynasty offers a startling new interpretation of the life of Jesus and the origins of Christianity that is grounded in careful analysis of the earliest Christian documents and recent archaeological discoveries, including the much-discussed "Jesus family tomb. He explains the crucial relationship between Jesus, a royal descendant of David, and his relative John the Baptizer, a priestly descendant of Aaron and Jesus' teacher.

The Jesus Dynasty offers a startling new interpretation of the life of Jesus and the origins of Christianity that is.Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. I highly recommend reading this book. It is intellectually stimulating, engaging and provocative reading.

The Jesus Dynasty offers a startling new interpretation of the life of Jesus and the origins of Christianity that is grounded in careful analysis of the earliest. Professor James Tabor offers a startling reading of the New Testament. com User, 13 years ago. I found it impossible to put this book down once I started reading it.

The Jesus Dynasty offers a startling new interpretation of the life of Jesus and the origins of Christianity that is grounded in careful analysis of the earliest Christian documents and recent archaeological discoveries, including the much-discussed "Jesus family tomb." In The Jesus Dynasty, biblical scholar James Tabor brings us closer than ever to the historical Jesus. He explains the crucial relationship between Jesus, a royal descendant of David, and his relative John the Baptizer, a priestly descendant of Aaron and Jesus' teacher
  • The Jesus Dynasty: The Hidden History of Jesus, His Royal Family, and the Birth of Christianity by James D. Tabor, explores the very logically and historically sound thesis the early Christianity (and that word is anachronistic in this work) was a family enterprise. After the death of Jesus, and for nearly a century afterward, the Jesus movement was run by members of his immediate family as heirs to the Davidic throne.

    A particular standout in this chain of command is a brother of Jesus, James the Just. We have records related to him in early Christian sources, and he was widely admired. Yet, he is largely written out of the record of the early Church. His teachings no longer remain.

    Tabor shows, through archaeology and textual analysis, that the early Jesus movement had two core pillars. The movement as led by James and the brothers and relatives of Jesus, in and around Judea and the Galilee. And the one led by Paul, to non-Jews, in Greek speaking lands. Paul’s version was hostile to Judaism and on the ascent when the gospels were written. Stories of James and the family of Jesus are found in the Gospels and Acts of the Apostles, but in truncated form. The Jesus movement was breaking away from Judaism into a new religion when the Gospels were written.

    The Jewish context of its birth and early days, although evident, were downplayed for centuries. This books reclaims that, and it is really firm and indisputable evidence, unless one is clouded by theological concerns.

  • I do not agree with the authors belief that Jesus simply died and was buried. I do, however, appreciate his fine approach by piecing together ancient legends and researching the text of the Bible in order to find what Jesus and his followers were doing step by step as he began his ministry and went to the cross. I also appreciated his ability to track Paul, finding many items I had missed in my studies. Having a human Jesus, one that might have married, been fathered by a human father, or doing many decidedly human things does not disolve for me his Godness. Our father is able to work many miracles and place within a human his spirit. Why else but a resurrected Jesus would have made Paul depart from his "job" for the Sanhedrian? The author makes it a vision quest for the man, but I think he had a life changing, revelation that came from meeting Christ face to face in resurrected form. That James and the other brothers, and even Peter failed to take the message to the next level is typical of human nature within a tribe or race of people who always held themselves separate. A resurrected Christ took the job out of their hands and gave it to Paul. All of them were important. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, as much as I enjoyed a good movie, like those that have come out recently about possible "descendants" of Jesus. These ideas do not shake my faith.

  • Professor Tabor explores a hidden aspect of the early church, the separation of the family members and close associates of the man Jesus from the myth builders (led by Paul) who turned the man into a god. In the course of this history, as the faith spread outside of Israel (and particularly after the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 CE) we lost the man and his teachings and instead focused only on the resurrection and atonement. Two millennia later, many spiritual seekers fail to learn they can have a personal relationship with God because the myths and theology have made Christianity harder to accept. Some may think The Jesus Dynasty is an attack on their faith; I, for one, find that it strengthens mine.

  • James Tabor has really brought wonderful information to us in this very easy to read yet highly informative book that deals with the ancient information that most never learn of.

    He does however propose some very controversial claims, such as Jesus had a paternal father in Roman soldier Pantera who was given mention by Celsus as he presents he learnt from Jesus' youngest brother Juda's descendents. I personally was not won over with this claim from this ancient antagonist to Christianity but regardless your position on these subjects this book cannot be passed by. It is just too powerful and wonderful to learn of Jesus' family especially His brother James who the New Testament describes as the elected head over Christ's First Church. Much like his contemporary Robert Eisenmann who is James' biographer, Tabor highlights the distinguishing differences between the Christianity of James to that of Paul who of course the Church has taken after for 2000 yrs of her History.

    Tabors usage of 'Q' or Quell document asserting its existence I found to be a bit bothersome considering this has never been substantiated. This book is highly antagonistic toward the dogmatic Romanized religion and should prove to be quite a challenge to her divine magesterium...

    One of Tabors thoeries which I have long suspected myself, is that the two double named Mary's at the Cross were in fact one Mother Mary the Mother of Christ and the Mother of at least five other children named in Scriptures as Jesus's brothers and sisters. He brings forth the issue of the addition made to the Gospel of Mark which we all have today in our Canon's inclusion despite there were translations which removed this 2nd c ending and it doesn't really take much stretch of the imagination to see how this could have very easily have been done by the copyists splitting mother Mary into two Marys, one being herself and the other being her sister who is curiously also named Mary and just so happens to have the same named children as those named in Scripture being Jesus' siblings. To my knowledge Salome is the only sister of Jesus that we know the name of from historical tests, and the one Gospel account has her named with these two Mary's. Historical writings reveal that Clopas was the brother of Joseph and according to Moshe Law the surviving brother is impelled to marry his brothers widow if there is no male child. This is called a Yibbum marriage and there is example of it in Scripture. One of the brothers of Jesus is named Joses which is short like Josy for Joseph. The naming a male heir after the deceased brother is required.

    Another tug at the concious when reading the Gospels are the two lineages of Jesus. They never really made sense and we know that Christ Himself claims Davidic bloodline as recipient of the Promise to David. Tabor does do a very good job making his case in this regard.

    His highlighting what the remaining Gospels record on who the women were at the Crucifiction is compelling and highly evocative work that draws the conciousness right back to the time of Christ in His authentic Jewish setting. Any and all students of religion need to read this work.

    He also spotlights the mission of Jesus in His historical efforts in contrast to some highly mythologized beliefs that have crept into the Church and even become Dogma's of Rome.

    Unlike DaVinci Code, some of these conspiracy theories-are not fiction.

  • Very interesting. The historical story sometimes coincides and sometimes doesn't with New Testament accounts. What I appreciated most is that Tabor doesn't try to dispel people's beliefs when the stories are contradictory, but he brings solid historical and cultural background to the time period and to the life of Christ that cause the reader to think and consider alternatives.