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ePub Ex-Gays?: A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation download

by Mark A. Yarhouse,Stanton L. Jones

ePub Ex-Gays?: A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation download
Author:
Mark A. Yarhouse,Stanton L. Jones
ISBN13:
978-0830828463
ISBN:
083082846X
Language:
Publisher:
IVP Academic (September 24, 2007)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1584 kb
Fb2 file:
1205 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr lit docx
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
441

Can those who receive religiously-­informed psychotherapy experience a change in their sexual orientation?

Such programs do not appear to be harmful on average to individuals.

With the publication of Ex-Gays? Stanton Jones and Mark Yarhouse have produced the most rigorous study to. .

With the publication of Ex-Gays? Stanton Jones and Mark Yarhouse have produced the most rigorous study to date to address this question. Knowing their results would generate controversy, the authors have thoroughly described the rationale for their procedures. While the authors fully acknowledge that change in sexual attractions did not occur for some individuals, they offer cogent and compelling reasons to believe that participation in religious ministry resulted in durable changes for others

Ex-Gays? : A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation. by Stanton L. Jones and Mark A. Yarhouse.

Ex-Gays? : A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation.

Start by marking Ex-Gays?: A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Stanton L. Jones & Mark ?. The book begins by discussing the nature of the controversy regarding sexual orientation and clarifying how conservative Christians might conceptualize the issue. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic, 2007. When it comes to defining sexual orientation, Jones and Yarhouse point out that the debate often is between the positions of essentialism and constructionism The position of essentialism tends to view same-sex sexual behavior as flowing from the essence of the individual. Such behavior is simply an expression of an individual's very self.

Such programs do not appear to be harmful on average to individuals.

Stanton L Jones Mark A Yarhouse. J Sex Marital Ther 2011 ;37(5):404-27. The authors explore methodological limitations circumscribing generalizability of the findings and alternative explanations of the findings, such as sexual identity change or adjustment. Download full-text PDF. Source.

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The authors conducted a quasi-experimental longitudinal study spanning 6-7 years examining attempted religiously mediated sexual orientation change from homosexual orientation to heterosexual orientation

The authors conducted a quasi-experimental longitudinal study spanning 6-7 years examining attempted religiously mediated sexual orientation change from homosexual orientation to heterosexual orientation. An initial sample was formed of 72 men and 26 women who were involved in a variety of Christian ministries, with measures of sexual attraction, infatuation and fantasy, and composite measures of sexual orientation and psychological distress, administered longitudinally.

Ex-gays? A Longitudinal Study of Religiously Mediated Change in Sexual Orientation. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2007, 414pp. ISBN 978-0-8308-2846-3.

Is it possible to be an ex gay? Stanton L. Jones and Mark A. Yarhouse present social science research on homosexuality designed to answer the questions: Can those who receive religiously-informed psychotherapy experience a change in their sexual orientation?Are such programs harmful to participants? The results show that outcomes for this kind of religiously-informed psychotherapy are similar to outcomes of therapy for other psychological problems. Such programs do not appear to be harmful on average to individuals. This research will be of interest to all those who want to know the latest research on sexual orientation change and the effects of religiously-informeded programs on those who utilize them.
  • The authors provide nuanced details about the attempt of homosexuals to leave that lifestyle. I appreciate that the authors present celibacy in the positive light that the Christian church has traditionally seen it. Celibacy is not a failure but a high calling through thousands of years of church history.

  • Jones has written a book that is at once both rigorous and insightful on a contemporary and hot topic. As a professional researcher he understands methodology and refutabikity. As a human he has tackled an often emotional topic to help bring some sanity and clarity. In this book Jones has accomplished both.

  • When this book first came out I bought it and found it very encouraging in continuing to follow the advice I'd been given years ago by an Episcopal priest, to love those who suffer from what some call now same-sex attraction, but to never accept it. He gave me that advice just prior to a holiday. "Ask them to dinner, but don't ask them to stay overnight."

    Yesterday, I took this book with me to the Colorado House Judicial Committee hearing on Senate Bill 11 concerning "civil unions", defined identically to marriage but not called marriage because the Colorado Constitution defines marriage as between one man and one woman.

    Listening all the arguments in favor of the bill, one two-minute testimony after another, hour after hour, it became clear there were two main arguments: 1) we like it, so we have a civil right to do it, we are told that in the Declaration of Independence; and 2) we can't stop it, it's just how we were born, just like skin color.

    This book directly addresses argument #2. I wish very much that I'd taken the book out of my bag and used my two-minutes to read to the committee from it. But I didn't. We'd been cut from 3 to 2 minutes, there just wasn't time.

    If you live in Colorado, I suggest you forward a link to this page to your Colorado House representative. They will thank you (at least most of them will), and so will I if you'll send me a copy of your email, send it to [email protected]

    John S Wren
    Founder & Registered Representative
    ReferendumOrRecall.org A Colorado Political Committee
    "Working to get SB11 referred to Colorado voters."
    ReferendumOrRecall.org and Facebook.com/WeVoteOrWeRecall

    How about a revised edition updating this with additional research since 2007? Also, I'd suggest an appendix in the back for therapists who offer help to those who suffer from same-sex attraction and another with a list of the various 12-step and other group support programs that are helpful to them.

  • A must read. This text documents a scientific study (Jones and Yarhouse) of sexual orientation change efforts, the findings of which were presented to the APA. The study concludes that such therapeutic efforts are indeed effective and, contrary to the alarmist hype currently being fomented by state senate bills like California’s “Must Stay Gay” Bill, they are also safe and lead to significant decreases in depression and suicidality. Similar findings have also been observed in a new study by Santero, Whitehead, and Ballesteros. Men and women who want to curb their desires and change their unwanted behaviors have every right to do so, and now there is conclusive scientific evidence which shows that therapies geared towards achieving such goals are both safe and effective.

  • I was one of the subjects of the longitudinal study and can attest to the bias of the researchers in favor of reparative therapies. The study took meticulous steps so that on paper it would appear that it was conducted in a scientifically sound and unbiased manner. However, each time I was asked to complete the assessment the interviewer would go over disclosures that explained the study was being conducted as part of their coursework at a Christian college. There were numerous instances when the interviewer would ask that I clarify an answer to one of the items on the assessment, usually when my original response was not in support of reparative therapies. After some years I began to experience deep anxiety over answering the questionnaire and dreading the interactions with the interviewer(s). When I decided to drop out of the study I received a call from one of the authors who told me that if I pulled out from this study completely there would be "eternal consequences". I remember him clearly stating that the "souls of an entire generation" could be affected if I did not continue and stay with my initial course of answers-- which were born out of intense pressure put upon me by the church and ex-gay ministries I attended. When I finally found the courage to stand up to the institutions representing ex-gay and reparative therapies they all responded in much the same manner, with condemnation and instillment of fear. I am not aware whether or not my responses were ever included in the final study but I was one of those who attempted to withdraw and had to suffer judgement and being chastised by one of the so called leaders of this study.