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by Herbert Aptheker,W. E. B. DuBois

ePub The Education of Black People: Ten Critiques, 1906-1960 download
Author:
Herbert Aptheker,W. E. B. DuBois
ISBN13:
978-0870231308
ISBN:
0870231308
Language:
Publisher:
University of Massachusetts Press; New edition edition (December 1973)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1694 kb
Fb2 file:
1344 kb
Other formats:
docx lit docx lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
249

E. Burghardt Du Bois, Herbert Aptheker.

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Bibliographic Details. Book Condition: Good. Dust Jacket Condition: No Jacket. SuzyQBooks Online used books. Publisher: The University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst, NY, . Publication Date: 1973. Visit Seller's Storefront.

Was a good walk through of Black Higher Education during Du Bois' time. Wish I read this during my history of higher education class. Du Bois turned "Crisis" into the foremost black literary journal. The black nationalist expanded his interests to global concerns, and is called the "father of Pan-Africanism" for organizing international black congresses.

Books and proceedings. Volume7, Issue1, 1976, p. 122–123.

The Education of Black People: Ten Critiques, 1906 - 1960.

The Education of Black P. .has been added to your Cart. However, Herbert Aptheker was able to have them published after Du Bois's death. This book is the only collection of Du Bois's major thoughts and insights on the role of higher education for African Americans. Oddly enough no publisher would print these essays during Du Bois's lifetime. This book is the most comprehensive thinking of Du Bois on higher education. The essays primarily cover the role of Black colleges as well as the importance of financial and intellectual independence of Black education institutions.

Undoubtedly the most influential black intellectual of the twentieth century and one of America's finest historians, . DuBois knew that the liberation of the African American people required liberal education and not vocational training. He saw education as a process of teaching certain timeless values: moderation, an avoidance of luxury, a concern for courtesy, a capacity to endure, a nurturing love for beauty. At the same time, DuBois saw education as fundamentally subversive

Medical apartheid: The dark history of medical experimentation on black Americans from colonial times to the present. New York: Broadway Books.

The white racial frame: Centuries of racial framing and counter-framing. Medical apartheid: The dark history of medical experimentation on black Americans from colonial times to the present. DuBois knew that the liberation of the African American people required liberal education and not vocational training

Undoubtedly the most influential black intellectual of the twentieth century and one of America's finest historians, .

Du Bois, W. E. Herbert Aptheker (E., The Education of Black People: Ten Critiques, 1906 - 1960, (Monthly . a b Douglas A. Blackmon, Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II, 2009., Contributions by W. B. Du Bois in Government Publications and Proceedings, (Kraus-Thomson Organization: NY, 1980). Du Bois, W. Herbert Aptheker, Bettina Aptheker, David Graham Dnm Dubois (E.,Prayers for Dark People, (University of Massachusetts Press: MA, 1980).

  • I have read many dubois books, this one by far is one of the best he has written. He expressed the need for colleges more so HBCU to get themselves in check and properly educate the young minds of tomorrow. I highly recommend this book.

  • Dubois preaches an intellectual perspective that could spur any nationalist movement.

  • A good book.

  • This book was very hard to get through. It was boring and uninteresting. I do not recommend buying this book.

  • Thankfully this book has been reprinted, along with a new 2001 introduction by Herbert Aptheker (who puts in a gentle "slam" of David Levering Lewis's two Pulitzer Prize winning biographies for good measure). The picture of Du Bois on the new cover is another one of those "I am God and You are not worthy" type of pictures. I've gone and made it one of my screen savers.
    Du Bois's prescient and practical advice is, as usual, pretty much on target. It is also interesting to observe the evolution in his thinking in the fifty-four years covered in this slim (you can read this book in a couple of sittings) volume. He answers some eternally debated questions: To whom should college presidents and administrations be ultimately accountable? (Alumni) What is the point of a liberal education? (character) etc.
    This book goes far beyond the "Booker T vs. W.E.B." educational debates that dominated 100 years ago (and that most people remember). It provides specific pedagogical advice and is written in the typical Du Boisian style; lucid, straightforward, inspirational. The man lived longer than most, and did a whole lot while he was alive. In its own way this little book is just as important, if not more so, than the other little book for which he is justifably famous, "The Souls of Black Folk."

  • This book is the only collection of Du Bois's major thoughts and insights on the role of higher education for African Americans. Oddly enough no publisher would print these essays during Du Bois's lifetime. However, Herbert Aptheker was able to have them published after Du Bois's death. This book is the most comprehensive thinking of Du Bois on higher education. The essays primarily cover the role of Black colleges as well as the importance of financial and intellectual independence of Black education institutions. He makes it exceedingly clear that education for full social equality and Black uplift must be the hallmark of Black educators and education institutions. His essay on "The Field and Function of the Negro College" makes an excellent institutional blueprint to accompany his TWO essays on the talented tenth (1903 AND 1948)which outlined his views on individual responsibilities of educated Blacks. As African American higher ed institutions and op! portunities are on unstable ground (in light of anti-affirmative action policies and the financial distress of HBCU's) the current generation of Black educators, policy makers, and scholars would do well to harken to the sage advice offered by the greatest African American scholar-activist that ever lived. There is much to be found in these essays that has relevance to the challenges we face in the coming century. As an African American doctoral candidate in higher education I find comfort in knowing that I have Dr. Du Bois's words, insights, and legacy at my fingertips. As this book is out of print, I would suggest that others who do not own this volume petition the publisher to renew it. It's a treasure to be cherished.

  • Required reading for black people, especially students. Enough said.