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by James Agee

ePub Let Us Now Praise Famous Men download
Author:
James Agee
ISBN13:
978-0395296967
ISBN:
039529696X
Language:
Publisher:
Boston Houghton Mifflin Company 1980.; Twelth Printing edition (1980)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1428 kb
Fb2 file:
1900 kb
Other formats:
azw mobi lit lrf
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
201

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is a book with text by American writer James Agee and photographs by American photographer Walker Evans, first published in 1941 in the United States.

Let Us Now Praise Famous Men is a book with text by American writer James Agee and photographs by American photographer Walker Evans, first published in 1941 in the United States. The work documents the lives of impoverished tenant farmers during the Great Depression. Although it is in keeping with Evans' work with the Farm Security Administration, the project was initiated not by the FSA, but by Fortune magazine

Very few books can knock me like Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Originally commissioned as a report back to the Northern seaboard’s intellectua-lites on the state of Southern affairs, ‘reporter’ Agee did something no one saw coming (including himself): he fell in love.

Very few books can knock me like Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. In love with the people he lived with and among, the land, the architecture, crops, roads, bedbugs, clothes, patois, sky; the whole cosmic smear of life lived by fundamentally good people at its absolute barest and most brutal.

FAMOUS MEN, I think, is not the sort of book that would ever gain wide acceptance.

Background Although Agee's and Evans' work was never published as the intended magazine article, their work has endured in the form in which it finally emerged, a lengthy, highly original book.

It was the time of . President Franklin Roosevelt's "New Deal" programs designed to help the poorest segments of the society. Although Agee's and Evans' work was never published as the intended magazine article, their work has endured in the form in which it finally emerged, a lengthy, highly original book. Agee's text is part ethnography, part cultural anthropological study, and part novelistic, poetic narrative set in the shacks and fields of Alabama.

A Death in the Family, the Pulitzer Prize–-winning novel that he worked on for over a decade and that was published posthumously in 1957, recreates in stunningly evocative prose Agee’s childhood i. .

This Library of America volume collects his fiction along with his extraordinary experiment in what might be called prophetic journalism, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941), a.A Death in the Family, the Pulitzer Prize–-winning novel that he worked on for over a decade and that was published posthumously in 1957, recreates in stunningly evocative prose Agee’s childhood in Knoxville, Tennessee, and the upheaval his family experienced after his father’s death in a car accident when Agee was six years old. A whole world, with its sensory vividness and social constraints, comes to life in this child’s-eye view of a few catastrophic days.

Physically Agee was quite powerful, in the deceptive way of uninsistent large me. In Alabama he worked I don’t know how late. Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on the spot at night

Physically Agee was quite powerful, in the deceptive way of uninsistent large men. In movement he was rather graceless. Some parts of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men read as though they were written on the spot at night. Later, in a small house in Frenchtown, New Jersey, the work, I think, was largely night-written. Literally the result shows this; some of the sections read best at night, far in the night The first passage of A Country Letter is particularly night-permeated.

Электронная книга "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men", James Agee, Walker Evans

Электронная книга "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men", James Agee, Walker Evans. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

There’s that wonderful moment in Let Us Now Praise Famous Men where James Agee asks you to put your ear against a speaker and listen to Beethoven or Schubert (though I never understood the Schubert part) on the radio and crank the volume all the way up and. stay there. stay there, breathing as lightly as possible, and not moving, and neither eating nor smoking nor drinking.

Trade pbk.; unmarked; no bent or torn pp.; crease to spine; cover, fine
  • This is an astounding chronicle, in equally evocative words and photographs, of life in the rural South amid the Great Depression. I purchased this as research for a stage production of To Kill a Mockingbird, which takes place in that time period in fictional Maycomb County, AL. I had never read the book before, although I was familiar with some of Walker Evans' photographs. I am completely blown away.

  • This work is touted by some as "one of the twentieth century's greatest pieces of literature." I wouldn't go that far, but the photos are incredible and I have to say the reader is placed right inside the tenant farmer's (Alabama) house and in the fields he tends. The time is the mid-1930s, in the depths of the Great Depression. Tenant farmers down South are struggling with deepening debt, chronic illnesses in their families (NO health care), land that is not arrable, and the hopeless, grinding poverty much of America suffered through in that era. The author, at times, sounds like he is attempting to imitate William Faulkner. The writing in places is highly complex, stream of consciousness stuff in some places. I like the book a lot but the reader must be very patient and willing to read methodically. It's not a breezy kind of style. It will also break your heart. The tenant farmer certainly had a rough go of it. Makes you wonder how much of this country is still in such dire straits.

  • Wow is this book a roller coaster ride. For me It went from deeply affecting and beautifully poetic to tedious and annoying. For a while I honestly thought this might be the best book I ever read. Then the pace slows . . . or stops even . . . as if you're spacing out along with the author and fixating on a floorboard or cheap picture on the wall. And then it seems like the author hands over the wheel to the photographer, who writes whatever pops into his head for pages upon pages. Or maybe its the same dude writing, in an altered state of mind, I'm not sure.

    Anyway, to me this book is brave and profound. The brave part is the author's refusal to cash in on this experience by writing what he thinks we (or his bosses) want to hear. But then again he pretty much betrays his trusting hosts by snooping through their stuff and writing real personal stuff surely without their permission. The profoundness to me is the effective relaying of dignity amid the tragedy of a truly trapped situation.

    If you have ever over-romanticized the south of old, or poor farm life, this book should cure you for good. It's not all perfect, but parts of it are. I would say its definitely worth the trip . . . just be ready for some detours.

  • It's hard to explain the power of this book. It's a cultural snapshot, but it's also a personal accounting of the coming-together of two cultures, one sophisticated, the other less so. It is the "less so" that is compelling. Highly recommend.

  • Book is excellent but very deep. I found myself re-reading from time to time.
    Reader be prepared for the author's projection of how he views the world and at times not so much about the subjects in his observations.
    I think his advantage is being a New Yorker allowing him to see a world that is so foreign to him. Whereas a Southerner as myself would view more as not being odd or abnormal.

  • I was assigned to read this book in college. Historically, I've loathed anything I've ever been REQUIRED to read; I prefer to come to the decision as to whether or not I am going to read something on my own. However, I was very much hooked on this book within the first thirty pages or so. Now, having read it twice, it is easily in my top 5 favorite books ever.

    While the book explores the day to day lives of some of the poorest to come out of extreme rural Alabama, the presentation is rather depth of content is what keeps me reading. Agee's words manage to mix more perception and mental connection than a journalistic account of what he and Walker experience. If you pace your reading and reference the photos as they are featured in the text (because they are grouped together in the middle, or at least they were in the edition I have), then it provides insight into Agee's level of perception...almost like when you ask someone if you can borrow their prescription glasses.

    I can't recommend this enough. I can't assure you will enjoy it, because it is a lot more than what it looks and reads like at first...but it is certainly in no way a waste of your time and money to experience.

  • Photos by Walker Evans and text by James Agee...how could this not be excellent! Incredibly moving. Let us honor those merely trying to survive and feed their families .... for them, a meal is the ultimate trial. Agee and Walker's work centered around the working, and literally dirt poor in America, which should be a bounty of opportunity, some 70 years ago....and this is still a timeless story, there are STILL too many families living on the edge their entire lives. I hope this remarkable work never goes out of print, it's difficult to find now, thank goodness for Amazon.

  • One of the three books that have deeply influenced my life. From Agee's passionate prose and Evans's clear-eyed photographs, one can arrive at a deep understanding of what it means to be human, if understanding is a possibility.