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ePub One of the Children: Gay Black Men in Harlem (Men and Masculinity) download

by Alex W. Costley,William G. Hawkeswood

ePub One of the Children: Gay Black Men in Harlem (Men and Masculinity) download
Author:
Alex W. Costley,William G. Hawkeswood
ISBN13:
978-0520081123
ISBN:
0520081129
Language:
Publisher:
University of California Press (April 30, 1997)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1937 kb
Fb2 file:
1157 kb
Other formats:
txt mbr lrf lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
264

Gay black men, a thriving subculture of the black and gay communities, are doubly marginalized. Hawkeswood also explores what it means for these men to be both gay and black

Gay black men, a thriving subculture of the black and gay communities, are doubly marginalized. Along with other black men, they are typically portrayed in the media and literature as ''street corner men''-unemployed drifters, absentee fathers, substance abusers. Hawkeswood also explores what it means for these men to be both gay and black. In the process, he makes the surprising discovery that while the AIDS virus looms all around them, it has not yet significantly affected the community of gay blacks who choose their sexual partners exclusively from among Harlem's other gay black men. Скачать (pdf, . 0 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

The late William G. Hawkeswood was Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Columbia University, SUNY Purchase, and York College. Alex W. Costley is a doctoral candidate in anthropology at Columbia University. I like the authors style and perspective but when it comes to mere scientific methodology the author is lackinig in his investigation. Not a scientific approach at all and conclusions are a-priori. I rather he wrote a book about what he thinks black men in Harlem are than doing an investigation of sorts with only a control group. He only based his assumptions on a type and class of black men that would recommend to him others "like themselves".

Gay black men, a thriving subculture of the black and gay communities, are doubly marginalized. Along with other black men, they are typically portrayed in the media and literature as "street corner men"-unemployed drifters, absentee fathers, substance abusers. In the larger gay community, they are an invisible minority. In the process, he makes the surprising discovery that while the AIDS virus looms all around them, it has not yet significantly affected the community of gay blacks who choose their sexual partners exclusively from among Harlem's other gay black me. .

5. "Different from Other Colors": Black Culture and Black Identity - 6. "Gay Is Lovin' Men": Gay Identity in Harlem - 7. "Different to Other Men": The Meaning of Sexuality for Gay Black Men - 8. "This Epidemic Thing": Gay Black Men and AIDS in Harlem - 9. "One of the Children": Being a Gay Black Man. in Harlem.

Hawkeswood, William . -1992. Subject: African American gays - New York (State) - New York. Subject: Gay community - New York (State) - New York.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. One of the Children: Gay Black Men in Harlem. William G. Hawkeswood, Alex W. Costley. Category: science books, psychology behavior. 0 Mb. Nietzsche: The Gay Science: With a Prelude in German Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs. Friedrich Nietzsche, Bernard Williams, Josefine Nauckhoff, Adrian Del Caro. Category: Philosophy. 8 Mb. Democracy and the Quest for Justice: Russian and American Perspectives. Tatiana Alekseeva, William Gay. Category: science books, philosophy.

Chicago Distribution Center. Townsand PriceSpratlen, "One of the Children: Gay Black Men in Harlem by William G. Hawkeswood," American Journal of Sociology 103, no. 5 (March 1998): 1489-1490. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty. Racial Profiling and Use of Force in Police Stops: How Local Events Trigger Periods of Increased Discrimination.

PowerNomics: The National Plan to Empower Black America is a five-year plan to make Black America a prosperous and . An altogether path-breaking collection of riveting essays

PowerNomics: The National Plan to Empower Black America is a five-year plan to make Black America a prosperous and empowered race that i.Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome - Joy DeGruy. An altogether path-breaking collection of riveting essays

Men’s studies, the men's movement, and the study of black masculinities: Further demystification of.Hawkeswood, W. G. (1996). Berkeley: University of California Press.

Men’s studies, the men's movement, and the study of black masculinities: Further demystification of masculinities in America. Gordon (E., The American Black Male: His present status and his future. Chicago: Nelson-Hall. Franklin, C. W. (1986). Brother to brother: New writings by Black gay men. Boston: Alyson.

Gay black men, a thriving subculture of the black and gay communities, are doubly marginalized. Along with other black men, they are typically portrayed in the media and literature as "street corner men"—unemployed drifters, absentee fathers, substance abusers. In the larger gay community, they are an invisible minority. One of the Children, the first formal cultural study of gay black men in Harlem, not only illuminates this segment of America's gay population but presents a far richer, more diverse portrait of black men's lives than is commonly perceived.Based on two years' intensive research—during which the author lived in Harlem's gay community—including extensive interviews with fifty-seven community members, this book depicts gay black men's lives in all their social, economic, and cultural complexity. William Hawkeswood takes us from the street into the homes and lives of his subjects. He describes the elaborate network of friends, called "family," that supports these men emotionally and financially, and the community's two-tiered economic structure, comprising gay men and "boys," or hustlers.Hawkeswood also explores what it means for these men to be both gay and black. In the process, he makes the surprising discovery that while the AIDS virus looms all around them, it has not yet significantly affected the community of gay blacks who choose their sexual partners exclusively from among Harlem's other gay black men.
  • I like the authors style and perspective but when it comes to mere scientific methodology the author is lackinig in his investigation. Not a scientific approach at all and conclusions are a-priori. I rather he wrote a book about what he thinks black men in Harlem are than doing an investigation of sorts with only a control group. He only based his assumptions on a type and class of black men that would recommend to him others "like themselves". So you can't really define black men in Harlem if you only hang around with a similar group of guys that know one another all too well. Read it if you into black male sociology, but otherwise, nah.

  • The book contains many incisive quotations from gay Harlemites who consider themselves black first and gay second, and whose social and sexual networks are black. The research was done in the late 1980s for a Columbia anthropology Ph.D. The author, a white New Zealander, died in 1992, and it took a more years for the book to reach print.
    Hawkeswood was so intent on challenging the focus on black male irresponsibility (and pathology), that he claims no one else studied middle-class blacks (ignoring SLIM'S TABLE, BLACK BOURGEOIS, etc.). On his way to providing an antithesis of the studies of junkies and slackers, he comes across as a Candide (or Pangloss), downplaying homophobia and "fagbashing" in Harlem and making his informants come across as almost saintly in their devotion to their churches, natal families, and social networks. Hawkeswood gathered some interesting material, and the social science literature IS slanted toward black ne're-do-wells, but is the solution "politically correct" bias in the other direction?