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ePub The Average American: The Extraordinary Search for the Nation's Most Ordinary Citizen download

ePub The Average American: The Extraordinary Search for the Nation's Most Ordinary Citizen download
ISBN13:
978-1586484590
ISBN:
1586484591
Language:
Publisher:
PublicAffairs; 2nd edition
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1631 kb
Fb2 file:
1461 kb
Other formats:
doc rtf azw mobi
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
201

The average American falls asleep within seven minutes of going to bed and eats three pounds of peanut butter annually.

The average American falls asleep within seven minutes of going to bed and eats three pounds of peanut butter annually. And there is a certain frisson in the idea that every American reading the book was, for a short time at least, at the beginning of the project, a candidate for O'Keefe's Everyman. Except that some of O'Keefe's candidates were more equal than others.

The Average American book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

The terms average Joe, ordinary Joe, Joe Sixpack, Joe Lunchbucket, Joe Snuffy, Joe Schmo (for males) and .

The terms average Joe, ordinary Joe, Joe Sixpack, Joe Lunchbucket, Joe Snuffy, Joe Schmo (for males) and ordinary Jane, average Jane, and plain Jane (for females), are used primarily in North America to refer to a completely average person, typically an average American.

The idiocy and mendacity of our leaders aside, this is a great Nation, and I have tears in my eyes as I conclude the book, where the man chosen by the author as the average American, informed on the 4th of July, properly concludes that it is a great honor. This is a superb book.

Lively, fun, thought-provoking, and more moving than one could have any right to expect, the book shines as a twist of the sharpest citrus peel, according to Britain's The Independent. Proclaims Newsweek, The journey toward run-of-the-mill has never been so remarkable. The New York Times. ntriguing, combining as it does the elements of a detective story and the trivia interest of Ripley's Believe It or Not. Nonfiction

Its regional success. includes its ranking sixth on The Patriot Ledger's South Shore

Its regional success. includes its ranking sixth on The Patriot Ledger's South Shore. Bestsellers list for the Boston-to-Cape Cod metropolitan area. The nonfiction book has been required reading for students. at many high schools and colleges and-from . businesses to HSBC offices in India to the . Embassy in Vienna, Austria-a diversity of employees worldwide. Published by PublicAffairs and Chilva and optioned by Fo. .

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-239) and index

Includes bibliographical references (p. 229-239) and index. A note about you - Author's note - "All that is great, good or beautiful" - "Obscurity is forever" - The middle way - Ordinary magic - Your name in lights - Guns, gambling, and giving it away - Somewhere over the rainbow - Going coastal - Fanfare for the common man. - Average American voter - Son of the father of the average American - The average American - A note on methodology.

Kevin O'Keefe, a marketing consultant, set out to find that person five years ago, armed with fresh data from the 2000 national census and a burning desire to pursue and comprehend the very thing he had spent most of his time avoiding: life as lived, defined and loved by the vast majority of his fellow citizens.

Home American IconsThe Nation’s Most Ordinary Citizen. The Nation’s Most Ordinary Citizen. American Icons, People. By Marti Attoun on November 12, 2006. I’m a little bit of a local celebrity, says Burns, who feels honored to be singled out for being perfectly ordinary. I’m just the everyday person who does his or her job to the best of his ability.

The Average American NPR coverage of The Average American: The .

News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. The Average American. On a journey across America to find the most typical American citizen, the author describes his encounters with "average" residents and businesspeople and dispels many myths and assumptions about the average American.

  • I heard about this book relatively late in it's life on Michael Feldman's "Whad'Ya know?" in late January 2008. Like most of the reviews I have read, the emphasis on the show was about the statistics. The statistics are both fun and important.

    But this book is more about Kevin O'Keefe and discovery. The book has buried tidbits about what life is all about. Kevin really took a journey of self awareness and I found many tidbits about life and what is really important in life buried in the pages of this book.

    One could read a book about Buddhism and have these points brought across to them. Or they can read this readable book with fun facts that we all know are part of our lives, and learn about ourselves and life along the way.

    The purpose of this discovery is uncovered by one of the individuals in the book. Most readers will figure this out before this section anyway. And where the book ends makes perfectly logical sense based on who wrote the book. One might call it poetic justice and be careful what you put on a T-shirt.

    Besides which, I found my self penciling in numbers that depicted my life in the margins near the numbers and values Kevin used to define the average American. I did not fit his definition to well, living most of my adult life 300+ miles from home and eating lots of chunky peanut butter. Thus, I weigh about 10 pounds over the average limit.

    I would suggest you buy the book and sharpen your pencil and have a go at it and discover yourself.

  • This is an interesting journey for a man who sets out to find the average American. There are many interesting anecdotes about what being average actually is or is not. The problem is that many people are knocked out of the running by circumstances outside themselves. I lost my averageness right off the top by living in a state with two Republican Senators. No way could I re enter the club with the fact my income is almost exactly median.

    On the other hand I would have been knocked out by my own hand eventually. For instance, I like crunchy peanut butter better than smooth.

    This is a frivolous book, but entertaining.

  • What should be a fascinating compendium of facts and anecdotes about America and its people is actually a meandering, arbitrary journey. While watertight methodology isn't expected from a book like this, methodology should at least be conscientious and consistent. The writing is also sub-par. It's not bad, but nor does it seem like it benefited from sound editing and fresh ideas. This book doesn't deliver.

    Better writing from a better researcher would have increased this book's value significantly.

  • The book summarizes the very subjective search for a person who the author considers to be the most representative average American. He develops criteria for the search that change throughout the search making the results less about finding the average American and more about the author learning about people. He chooses some criteria for his search that eliminate vast areas of the country automatically and therefore biases the result completely. For example, why does the average American have to live in a city that has at least 0.1 inch of snowfall each year? That eliminates large parts of the South. Or have to have a measurable amount of dew on their lawn every morning? That eliminates much of the Western US.

    It is interesting that he requires the average American must live in the average suburb in the country, which he again describes by his own subjective criteria. Not surprisingly, he discovers that that average community happens to be the town next to the one where he grew up in Connecticut. His various biases come home to roost there.

    The search he carries out is interesting from the point of view of a subjective search for a definition of what is average. But the book does not advance the reader's understanding of what an Average American would be, if there were such a person.

    I am sure that many people will find the book entertaining from a human interest point of view because the author does describe his encounters with many people along the way. But it is not scientific and could mislead people about his result.

    I initially gave the book a two star rating because it does not fulfill what the author claims it represents. It is however readable and entertaining, so for many people it is still worth a read.