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ePub Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the Classroom Issues download

by Becky Francis

ePub Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the Classroom Issues download
Author:
Becky Francis
ISBN13:
978-0415231626
ISBN:
0415231620
Language:
Publisher:
Routledge; 1 edition (August 30, 2000)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1626 kb
Fb2 file:
1215 kb
Other formats:
mobi doc lrf docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
696

Boys, Girls and Achievement book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the Classroom Issues as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Boys, Girls and Achievement book. Start by marking Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the Classroom Issues as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Francis, Becky (2000). Boys, girls and achievement: addressing the classroom issues. Boys and girls in the primary classroom. Maidenhead: Open University Press. London: Routledge Falmer. Francis, Becky; Skelton, Christine, eds. (2001). Investigating gender: contemporary perspectives in education. Buckingham: Open University Press. (2003). Francis, Becky; Skelton, Christine (2005). Reassessing gender and achievement: questioning contemporary key debates.

Girls are now out-performing boys at GCSE level, giving rise to a debate in the media on boys' underachievement.

Boys, girls and achievement: Addressing the classroom issues. B Francis, C Skelton. Understanding minority ethnic achievement: Race, gender, class and'success'. R Lindsay, R Breen, A Jenkins. Studies in Higher Education 27 (3), 309-327, 2002. The book also discusses methods teachers might use challenge these gender constructions in the classroom and thereby address the 'gender-gap' in achievement.

Boys, Girls and Achievement - Addressing the Classroom Issues fills that gap and: provides a critical overview of the current debate on achievement; Focuses on interviews with young people and classroom observations to examine how boys and girls see themselves as learners; analyses the strategies teachers can use to improve the educational achievements of both boys and girls.

These were Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the classroom issues by Becky Francis and .

These were Boys, Girls and Achievement: Addressing the classroom issues by Becky Francis and Choice, Pathways and Transitions Post-16: New youth, new economies in the global city by Ball, Maguire and Macrae. Both addressed issues of educational attainment and both took as their starting point for observation the behaviour and attitudes of adolescents in their mid-teens. Boys and girls learn differently. Challenging current theories about gender and achievement, this book assesses the issues at stake and analyses the policy drives and changing perceptions of gender on which the 'gender and achievement' debates are based.

Boys, Girls and Achievement - Addressing the Classroom Issues fills that gap and: provides a critical overview of the current debate on achievement; Focuses on interviews with young people and classroom observations to examine how boys and girls see themselves as learners. Becky Francis provides teachers with a thorough ana. Number of Pages.

Girls are now out-performing boys at GCSE level, giving rise to a debate in the media on boys' underachievement. However, often such work has been a 'knee-jerk' response, led by media, not based on solid research. Boys, Girls and Achievement - Addressing the Classroom Issues fills that gap and:*provides a critical overview of the current debate on achievement;*Focuses on interviews with young people and classroom observations to examine how boys and girls see themselves as learners;*analyses the strategies teachers can use to improve the educational achievements of both boys and girls.Becky Francis provides teachers with a thorough analysis of the various ways in which secondary school pupils construct their gender identities in the classroom. The book also discusses methods teachers might use challenge these gender constructions in the classroom and thereby address the 'gender-gap' in achievement.