mostraligabue
» » Mayada : Daughter of Iraq

ePub Mayada : Daughter of Iraq download

by Jean P. Sasson

ePub Mayada : Daughter of Iraq download
Author:
Jean P. Sasson
ISBN13:
978-0385607261
ISBN:
0385607261
Language:
Publisher:
Transworld Pub; Reprint edition (September 30, 2003)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1386 kb
Fb2 file:
1113 kb
Other formats:
mobi docx txt lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
796

Other books by jean sasson. In a pleasant and lightly accented voice, she said, I am Mayada Al-Askari. She told me later that she hadn’t been employed by the Ministry for several years, that the men in charge would almost exclusively hire male translators.

Other books by jean sasson. Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia. Princess Sultana’s Daughters. Princess Sultana’s Circle.

Mayada, Daughter of Iraq book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Mayada, Daughter of Iraq: One Woman's Survival Under Saddam Hussein as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Jean P. Sasson (born 1950, Troy, Alabama, United States) is an American writer whose work mainly centers around women in the Middle East. Growing up in a small town, Sasson found adventure between the pages of books. Her strong desire to uproot herself from her rural surroundings led her to jump at the opportunity to work and travel abroad. In 1978 she traveled to Saudi Arabia to work in the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh as an administrative coordinator of medical affairs

Jean Sasson grew up in a small town in America's deep south before moving to the Middle East in 1978 to work at a prestigious royal hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In 1985, she met Princess Sultana, who inspired the widely acclaimed Princess Trilogy.

Jean Sasson grew up in a small town in America's deep south before moving to the Middle East in 1978 to work at a prestigious royal hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In 1985, she met Princess Sultana, who inspired the widely acclaimed Princess Trilogy

Mayada, Daughter of Iraq:. has been added to your Cart. Jean Sassoon's books are hard to put down. I have enjoyed reading all of them as well as learning about what it is like to be a woman in these Muslim countries.

Mayada, Daughter of Iraq:.

Mayada was born into a powerful Iraqi family. One grandfather fought alongside Lawrence of Arabia. The other is acclaimed as the first true Arab nationalist. Her uncle was Prime Minister for nearly forty years, her mother an important politician. When Saddam Hussein and his Ba'ath party seized power, and instituted his reign of terror, Mayada found herself alone in Baghdad, a divorced parent of two children, earning a meagre living printing brochures. In 1985, she met Princess Sultana, who inspired the widely acclaimed Princess Trilogy

Not only the story of a woman intimately connected to Iraq's cultured, ancient history, this book is a powerful witness to the terror and horror wrought by Saddam on the lives and souls of its ordinary citizens. Format Paperback 416 pages.

Jean Sasson is a writer and lecturer who has lived in Saudi Arabia and traveled extensively in the Middle East. Visit Jean Sasson at ww. eansasson. She is the author of four internationally best-selling books on the Middle East, including The Rape of Kuwait; Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia; Princess Sultana’s Daughters; and Princess Sultana’s Circle. Jean now lives in the southern United States, although she frequently visits the Middle East. Jean Sasson, Mayada, Daughter of Iraq: One Woman's Survival Under Saddam Hussein

Mayada: Daughter Of Iraq (Paperback). Jean Sasson (author). This book is also known as Mayada Daughter of Iraq – It is a highly political and heavy read More.

Mayada: Daughter Of Iraq (Paperback).

Mayada Al-Askari was born into a powerful Iraqi family. One grandfather fought alongside Lawrence of Arabia, the other is acclaimed as the first Arab nationalist. Her uncle was Prime Minister for nearly forty years, her mother an important politician. When Saddam Hussein and his Ba'ath Party seized power, and instituted his reign of terror, Mayada found herself alone in Baghdad, a divorced parent of two children, earning a meagre living printing brochures. Until one morning in August 1999 she was summarily arrested and dragged to the notorious Baladiyat Prison, falsely accused of printing anti-government propaganda. There she was thrown into a stinking cell already housing seventeen other 'shadow women'. Like latter-day Schehrazades, these women passed their days, while waiting for the next interrogation and torture session, telling each other their stories. They were eager to hear Mayada's stories of her privileged former life, of the history of her proud family, of kings and queens, of meetings with Saddam himself. Not only the story of a woman intimately connected to Iraq's cultured, ancient history, this book is a powerful witness to the terror and horror wrought by Saddam
  • Being from Russia myself, the country which suffered greatly from numerous dictatorships, especially in 30s-50s from Joseph Stalin, I was shocked by the similarity between the inhumane barbaric methods of ruling between Stalin and Hussein. Both dictators supposedly promoted progress encouraging education and universal literacy, equal rights for women, but at the same time kept the population in fear and terror. The story is very emotional, passionate and personal. A lot of historic facts which I didn't know about the country are given and they are helpful. The wonderful innocent women were subject to crazy tortures but they had each other's kindness and support afterwards. In Stalin's camps a huge part of the punishment was mixing innocent political prisoners with hard core criminals,totally dehumanized species, being around which was a torture as well.
    Amazing book.

  • If you liked the Sultana trilogy, you'll find the same high quality writing, but this book is missing some of the human interest and subtle byplay (and humor) found in her other books. There is a "sameness" of stories from Mayada's cellmates, and the torture accounts are horrible, but abbreviated in detail, fortunately.

    The outstanding feature of this book is how Sasson deftly explains Mayada's own journey culminating in her own imprisonment and fortunate escape from the hellish prison. There were times when I just could not read anymore of the sad, terrible accounts of how prisoners were mistreated; I had to read something else for relief. There should be a special place in Hell for those guards. However, I always returned to read more, I was hooked; I wanted to find out how this saga ended.

    Mayada has great insight into the personality of Saddam Hussein and Chemical Ali; her accounts of their cruelty, paranoia, and warped view of life makes the book believable. The detail provided enhances the reading experience. So, a well written account of one woman's journey to hell and back that just misses a five-star rating.

  • I just finished this book. It seems to me this book should be read by everyone who criticizes the American invasion of Iraq. If you read it and see what Mayada went through and what the people of Iraq went through under Saddam Hussein you would be glad that we removed him from power. I've always believed that leadership is everything and what leadership ignores or condones trickles down and either corrupts or improves things. Saddam and his cohorts were so evil that it is hard to conceive of. Everything they did trickled down and corrupted people. The people in power were sadists and the whole country lived in fear.

    I wonder what happened to the dear women that Mayada was unable to find out about who shared a prison cell with her. This story is heart breaking but it is something that people should be informed about, like the holocaust.

    The book was well written and I assume a good interpretation by Jean Sassoon of what Mayada told her. I hope and pray Iraq improves rather than falling back into the dismal past with some other horrible dictator.

    Jean Sassoon's books are hard to put down. I have enjoyed reading all of them as well as learning about what it is like to be a woman in these Muslim countries.

  • This is the fifth of Jean Sasson's books I have read and I thirst for more. I am saddened by the atrocities survived by women in the middle east, but at the same time I find parallels in the American culture. We may not be locked away in rooms as punishment, or confined to our houses only to leave when accompanied by a male family member, but even here in the US, women are subject to 'boys club' mentality and as free as we are, we are not equals. Jean has brought out the feminist in me when I didn't know there was one. Jean brings insight into another world hidden behind veils. I have but one complaint: she writes these stories so well, I want to help the women in her books; but I do not know how.

  • Amazing heartwarming story of women's survival in prison and how they were abused and beaten but still kept their faith and took care of each other in the worst of circumstances. Hard to believe that this is going on today while we live here in the comfort of our own homes with food, clothing and people who love us and take care of us. This is a great picture of the evil that exists in the Middle East and how far reaching it goes to poor helpless innocent men and women. God help us!

  • An amazing story about woman trying to survive under Saddam. To read all the stories that this woman was told from her cell mates of what they gone through was amazing. I can not imagine going through the torture that these woman have gone through, both the mental and physical. The strength of Samara is amazing. I hope against all reality. That all these women in cell 52 were released and able to be with their families again.

  • Jean Sasson's skilfully portrayed depiction of a woman's suffering and torture under Saddam's regime is not an easy read. Although most people are well aware of the atrocities perpetrated on innocents by Saddam and his cronies, yet Mayada's experience in the torture chambers and the stories of her cell mates, leave one gasping at the levels of inhumanity that humans are capable of. Being high-born, Mayada had personal access to intimate details of the Saddam clan and though a troubling, depressing narrative, none-the-less, interesting in its contents.

  • I thought Jean Sasson did a good job of writing the story. It was interesting to read what was happening in Iraq during Hussein's rein of terror. Everyone was afraid that every friend, neighbor, employee, or a jealous person would say anything that might make the secret police arrest them. Indeed, Mayada was arrested & imprisoned for awhile. The details of the horrendous things that went on made it a sad book, but a book, I found worth the time.