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ePub Media: The Second God download

by Nurit Karlin,John Carey,Tony Schwartz

ePub Media: The Second God download
Author:
Nurit Karlin,John Carey,Tony Schwartz
ISBN13:
978-0394502472
ISBN:
0394502477
Language:
Publisher:
Random House, Inc.; 1st edition (November 1, 1981)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1234 kb
Fb2 file:
1912 kb
Other formats:
azw txt lit lrf
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
715

Illustrated by Nurit Karlin. This is a superb book

Illustrated by Nurit Karlin Tony Schwartz. This is a superb book. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan " Media: The Second God takes up where The Responsive Chord left off.

Tony Schwartz, 20th century master of electronic media, created more than 20,000 radio and television spots for products, political candidates and non-profit public interest groups

Tony Schwartz, 20th century master of electronic media, created more than 20,000 radio and television spots for products, political candidates and non-profit public interest groups. Featured on programs by Bill Moyers, Phil Donahue and Sixty Minutes, among others, Schwartz has been described as a "media guru," a "media genius" and a "media muscleman. The tobacco industry voluntarily stopped their advertising on radio and television after Schwartz's produced the first anti-smoking ad to ever appear (children dressing in their parents' clothing, in front.

Media, The Second God book. Illustrated by Nurit Karlin Tony Schwartz. Tony Schwartz, the man Marshall McLuhan called "the guru of the electronic age" tells how the media have shaped our world-and how we can shape the media. Illustrated by Nurit Karlin.

Media: The Second God. (Tony Schwartz, the man Marshall McLuhan . (Tony Schwartz, the man Marshall McLuhan called "the guru. Tony Schwartz, the acknowledged master of electronic media, created more than 20,000 radio and television spots for products, political candidates and non-profit public interest groups.

Audio archivist, Media Theorist, Sound Designer, Advertising Producer, Political Consultant, Social Activist. eps in the interview reaffirming those many truths and prescient observations. John Carey, who attended that year's events and subsequently worked for Tony Schwartz, discusses Tony and "The Responsive Chord". Check out also the segments by Eric McLuhan (11:45) and Paul Levinson (45:10).

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. The Fat Cat Sat on the Mat. 4. Audio.

The Second God. By Tony Schwartz. TOWARD the end of ''Media: The Second God,'' I was once more on the verge of feeling depressed by the utopianism of Tony Schwartz's vision of the coming uses of the electronic media. Somehow, it didn't seem cheering to learn that ''the telephone is growing, albeit slowly, as a tool in education'' and that ''over 30,000 Wisconsin students attend telephone-based courses.

Carey began producing and guesting on many major groups from the US and Europe in the mid 1980s. Notables of the many included Jennifer Rush in 1985, John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers – Chicago Line in 1988, keyboards and producer. In 1992 with Joe Cocker – Now That You're Gone, Forest McDonald's Color Blind, Chris Norman, Peter Maffay, Milva, and in 2006 from Dire Straits, David Knopfler – Songs For The Siren.

Nurit Karlin, who died in Tel Aviv this week, at the age of eighty, was a regular cartoonist for . Karlin’s cartoons are deceptively simple. The viewer is drawn to them as if looking at a children’s-book illustration, only to be confronted with a quiet statement in the form of a line drawing

Nurit Karlin, who died in Tel Aviv this week, at the age of eighty, was a regular cartoonist for The New Yorker for fourteen years, starting in 1974. At that time, she was the only woman drawing cartoons for the magazine. Born in Jerusalem, Karlin drew as a child, and later, during her time serving in the Israeli Army, she decided to apply to art school. The viewer is drawn to them as if looking at a children’s-book illustration, only to be confronted with a quiet statement in the form of a line drawing. When I asked Karlin where she got her ideas, she said, If I knew where they came from, I would be the first in line! I used to doodle.

Tony Schwartz, the man Marshall McLuhan called "the guru of the electronic age" tells how the media have shaped our world--and how we can shape the media. Illustrated by Nurit Karlin.

"Who else could write more brilliantly about media as a second god than one of the few humans who has leanrned how to use and control it... Tony Schwartz. This is a superb book." -- Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan

"Media: The Second God takes up where The Responsive Chord left off, and is indispensable reading for anyone who works with media. Tony Schwartz shatters some myths and establishes some new standards by which all media will be judged." -- Joseph Napolitan, International Political Consultant

"Students and scholars of communication should be grateful that Tony Schwartz has written another original, compelling book about how media work. Tony Schwartz is a creative genius and a masterful teacher." -- Professor Kathleen Jamison, Director of Graduate Studies, University of Maryland

  • Twenty, thirty years ahead of his time, Tony Schwartz may be one of the Most Interesting People Who Ever Lived. Look for his audio recordings, but if you're in advertising or marketing, read this book.

  • Putting aside Tony Schwartz's contributions to and popularity among practitioners of advertising, media consulting, campaign management, sound editing, television production, anthropology, and communications as a whole, in reading this work we must admit the following: it is impossible to compose an effective narrative, analysis, or general study of modern man (be it in historical or sociological terms) without fully acknowledging and understanding the framework outlined in this book.

    The differences between how our grandparents communicated and how we communicate, the difference between the "transportation theory" of communication and the "resonance theory," are enormous. Our language, our social structures, and our very thoughts have been forever altered by this sea change, and an understanding of this transformation is absolutely required for an understanding of the world as a whole. It is impossible to illuminate these ideas any more succinctly than Mr. Schwartz has done in his two books, The Responsive Chord and the reviewed work, so I will refrain from commenting further. Suffice to say, you are already quite familiar with these ideas although you might never have heard them described in such detail.

    Do yourself a favor, and pick up this work or The Responsive Chord. Both will bring you a better understanding of media, communications, and the modern world entire. (A weighty and bold statement if ever there was one, but a sincere one nonetheless.)