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ePub American Bandwidth: Weblogs Essays download

by Michael E. Ross

ePub American Bandwidth: Weblogs  Essays download
Author:
Michael E. Ross
ISBN13:
978-1449018993
ISBN:
1449018998
Language:
Publisher:
AuthorHouse (October 16, 2009)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1404 kb
Fb2 file:
1912 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
978

AMERICAN BANDWIDTH (blog posts and essays).

AMERICAN BANDWIDTH (blog posts and essays). The United States between the 2004 election and the first 100 days of the Obama administration - its knights and knaves, its fears and joys, its new ironies and old habits, its capacity for change and transition - is topic A in this collection of essays and blog posts from a longtime observer of American life, politics and popular culture.

American bandwidth : weblogs and essays Michael E. Ross. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. American bandwidth : weblogs and essays Michael E. Download PDF book format. Download this format book. Book's title: American bandwidth : weblogs and essays Michael E. Library of Congress Control Number: 2009909859.

The American bandwidth is wider than it's ever been before. This is part of how that happened. Michael E. Ross writes frequently on the arts, race matters, politics and American culture. He was born in Washington, . and has lived in Germany, Chicago, Colorado, northern California, New York City and Washington state. com; and an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of Journalism.

American Bandwidth : Weblogs and Essays. America between the 2004 election and the first 100 days of the Obama administration - its knights and knaves, its fears and joys, its new ironies and old habits, its capacity for change and transition - is topic A in this collection of essays and blog posts from a longtime observer of American life, politics and popular culture.

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23/1 22. Personal Name: Ross, Michael E. Publication, Distribution, et. Bloomington, IN. AuthorHouse, (c)2009. All rights are reserved by their owners.

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The book is fine but this listing says the content is identical to the American version and that only the cover is different which is not true. There are many differences between the two versions, like the chapter questions and which pages things are located on. A more accurate description would say they are based on the same material and have many similarities. This book cannot be used interchangeably with the American version. 2 people found this helpful.

America between the 2004 election and the first 100 days of the Obama administration - its knights and knaves, its fears and joys, its new ironies and old habits, its capacity for change and transition - is topic A in this collection of essays and blog posts from a longtime observer of American life, politics and popular culture. A veteran reporter, essayist and critic, Michael E. Ross brings an incisive eye to presidential politics, press ethics and accountability, television news, activism in pop culture, the impact of Hurricane Katrina, the war in Iraq and other issues. In an often funny, always insightful collection of recent writing, the author offers takes on George Bush, Barack Obama, John McCain, Hillary Clinton, Michael Richards, Apple, Rupert Murdoch, FEMA, Mitt Romney, the GEICO cavemen, Michael Jackson and others in the national life. Valedictories for James Brown, August Wilson, Hunter Thompson, Norman Mailer, Coretta Scott King, Gerald Ford, Norman Whitfield, Tim Russert and Michael Jackson are spirited salutes to indispensable voices in the public discourse. Throughout, he explores with honesty, empathy and a jagged wit the ways we transform the nation and the ways the nation transforms us. The American bandwidth is wider than it's ever been before. This is how that happened.
  • Any reader seeking to plumb the origins of the phenomenon of Barack Obama would do well to start with Michael E. Ross's beautifully realized analysis, collected as a series of essays and published under the rubric "American Bandwidth." A common misperception is that the man who became the forty-fourth president of the United States came out of nowhere. Ross's writing demonstrates conclusively that this belittling viewpoint fails to take into account a multitude of factors -- well-explored here -- that make the rise of Obama seem not startling but inevitable. If we were surprised by Barack, it was because we weren't paying attention. Ross was. His book snatches us back to the half decade from 2004 to 2009, presenting a stingingly fresh portrait of the period, from the pop-cultural froth to the deep-sea political depths. Ross is a former N.Y. Times journalist who has clearly shaken off the restraints of the mainstream point of view to create a sharp perspective, by turns sly, goading, graceful, ruminative and plenary. The inevitable comparison is to Hunter S. Thompson's prescient writing about Jimmy Carter in Rolling Stone during the mid-1970s. Reading Ross is to understand Barack Obama in ways other journalists have failed to comprehend. Context is all, and Ross allows us to recall and immerse ourselves in those heady days when "No, it can't be" became "Yes, we can." What is most characteristic of Ross's thinking is its sweep, touching upon politics, music, literature, sociology, anything and everything that attracts his restless intelligence. He covers a lot of ground in this book, but the whole coalesces into something more than its myriad parts, a grand "you are there" portrait of a people, a time and a man. Obama's Chesire grin graces the cover of American Bandwidth, and after reading it, you won't have to ask, "Why is this man smiling?"

  • With more than 120 blog entries and essays, "American Bandwidth" collects the writings of journalist Michael E. Ross from November 2004 to June 2009, focusing on the Iraq war, Hurricane Katrina, the presidential election, the start of the Obama administration, and a variety of U.S. musical and cultural figures. The heart of the book is commentary and musing on the recent presidential race and its cast of characters.

    Starting with a piece on Colin Powell and ending with one on Michael Jackson, Ross particularly enjoys celebrating and exploring the lives of African-American figures and their impact on U.S. culture.

    Ross's background as a journalist, not surprisingly, tilts the book toward the topical: most pieces are more blog than essay, very much of the moment in which they were written. And many of them read as appreciations rather than critiques or investigations, such as the pieces on Norman Mailer, Levi Stubbs of the Four Tops, and Michelle Obama.

    I found myself most drawn to the more essay-like pieces here -- those with a bit more distance from the news of the day. One such piece is "The Way We Live Now," exploring "the depth of the nation's cultural divide," which Ross says reflects a "seeming disconnect between outrage and actions...[and] how popular culture, sports and other outlets of the national economy thrive on that outrage, even depend on it for their survival." He comments that "America's storied live-and-let-live ethos [is] doing battle with the equally powerful forces of rectitude and social convention" and connects this phenomenon to an ever-shorter attention span in the popular culture.

    In "The Age of Ubiquity" of 1/22/09, Ross also digs deeper, noting the movement of black and minority Americans away from the perceived cultural margins as expressed in advertising imagery, and linking this shift to the inauguration of Obama. And soon after, in "Comic Relief in the Obama Age," he explores how that very trend is illustrated in current comic books.

    I also appreciated his piece on Malcolm X, which notes how this important historical personage has been "held at figurative arm's both by the media and by the national historical record" -- and contrasts this distancing with the treatment of Martin Luther King, Jr.

    "American Bandwidth," with accessible, well-crafted, and lively pieces on a wide range of topics, is guaranteed to interest anyone who wants to recapture the cultural and political happenings of the past five years.