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ePub Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska download

by Elizabeth S. Grobsmith

ePub Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska download
Author:
Elizabeth S. Grobsmith
ISBN13:
978-0803221376
ISBN:
0803221371
Language:
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press; First Edition/First Printing edition (February 1, 1994)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1733 kb
Fb2 file:
1544 kb
Other formats:
mobi lit txt lrf
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
831

The subject of Indians in prison is of great importance not only because of the increasing Native American population in. .Still, all Natives were deemed American citizens in the 1930s.

The subject of Indians in prison is of great importance not only because of the increasing Native American population in prisons (and the consequences for Indian life) but because that population is so disproportionately high. Native Americans speak English, watch American TV, etc. This book implies that they just cannot relate to the larger culture.

Home Browse Books Book details, Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans. The final chapters present comparative data on Indians incarcerated in other states and offer recommendations for dealing with recurrent problems. Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska. By Elizabeth S. Grobsmith.

Indians in Prison book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Civilization and its Native American Discontents. H. C. Wolfart, Freda Ahenakew. Elizabeth S. Native American Resurgence and Renewal: A Reader and Bibliography. Robert N. Wells Jr. They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of the Chilocco Indian School.

Personal Name: Grobsmith, Elizabeth S. Varying Form of Title: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska. Publication, Distribution, et. Lincoln. University of Nebraska Press, (c)1994. Physical Description: xv, 209 p. : ill. ;, 24 cm. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -201) and index. Rubrics: Prisoners Nebraska Indians of North America Social conditions.

Elizabeth S. Fifteen years ago, the Native American inmates incarcerated in the Nebraska Department of Corrections, with the aid of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), brought suit against prison administrators for violation of their religious freedom rights. Fifteen years ago, the Native American inmates incarcerated in the Nebraska Department of Corrections, with the aid of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), brought suit against prison administrators for violation of their religious freedom rights prison and has served as the foundation for other lawsuits which profess violation of this Decree.

Native Americans have been featured in numerous volumes of children's literature. Some have been authored by non-Indigenous writers, while others have been written or contributed to by Indigenous authors. There are a great many works of children's literature that feature American Indians. Some are considered classics, such as Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder, and some are award winners, such as The Matchlock Gun by Walter D. Edmonds

Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. We shall not forget this: Native Americans and colonial racism in American Prisons.

Indians in Prison: Incarcerated Native Americans in Nebraska. Sweat lodges and headbands: An introduction to the rights of Native American prisoners. New England Journal on Criminal & Civil Confinement, 18, 3. oogle Scholar. Hutchinson, K. (2009) Interview with Elizabeth Grant. In S. Bowman (E., Color behind bars: Racism in the US Prison System: Volume One: Historical and contemporary Issues (pp. 305–310). Santa Barbara, Denver & Oxford: Praeger.

Penologists, social services administra-tors, and students of criminal justice as well as of Indian studies will welcome this groundbreaking study, the product of close observation of and direct involvement on behalf of Indians in the Nebraska state penal system.

Penologists, social services administra-tors, and students of criminal justice as well as of Indian studies will welcome this groundbreaking study, the product of close observation of and direct involvement on behalf of Indians in the Nebraska state penal system. Opening with a group profile, it discusses in detail the special concerns of that population: cultural and spiritual activities (Indians incarcerated in Nebraska were among the first to seek court permission to practice their religion behind bars), the seriously underestimated rates of alcoholism and drug addiction and the need for culturally appropriate treatment, and high rates of recidivism and their effect on parole. The final chapters present comparative data on Indians incarcerated in other states and offer recommendations for dealing with recurrent problems. Indians in Prison is particularly timely for its focus on how the social environments of Indian youth contribute to their delinquency and substance abuse and how Indians in prison perceive rehabilitation strategies, parole, and the law.