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ePub Gender, crime and empire: convicts, settlers and the state in early colonial Australia (Studies in Imperialism MUP) download

by Kirsty Reid

ePub Gender, crime and empire: convicts, settlers and the state in early colonial Australia (Studies in Imperialism MUP) download
Author:
Kirsty Reid
ISBN13:
978-0719066986
ISBN:
0719066980
Language:
Publisher:
Manchester University Press (October 1, 2007)
Subcategory:
Social Sciences
ePub file:
1927 kb
Fb2 file:
1141 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
140

Gender, Crime and Empire:. has been added to your Basket Kirsty Reid is Senior Lecturer in History and co-director of the Centre for the Study of Colonial & Postcolonial Societies at the University o. .

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It considers the shifting nature of state policies towards courtship, relationships and attempts at family formation which subsequently became matters of class conflict.

Gender, Crime and Empire book. The book considers the shifting nature of state policies towards courtship, relationships, and attempts at family formation that became matters of class conflict.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Gender, Crime and Empire: Convicts . Studies in Imperialism. Kirsty Reid is Senior Lecturer in History and co-director of the Centre for the Study of Colonial & Postcolonial Societies at the University of Bristol -.

Studies in Imperialism. Country of Publication.

Results from Google Books. Kay Daniels Award (2008).

It considers the impact of gender and class on definitions of crime and the . Crime and Empire: Convicts, Settlers and the State in Early Colonial Australia (Manchester, 2007).

It considers the impact of gender and class on definitions of crime and the treatment of offenders as well as the historiography of criminal justice.

The book considers the shifting nature of state policies towards courtship . Kirsty Reid is Senior Lecturer in History and co-director of the Center for the Study of Colonial and Postcolonial Societies, at the University of Bristol.

The book considers the shifting nature of state policies towards courtship, relationships, and attempts at family formation that became matters of class conflict. Revising established models of the colonies-which depicted convict women as a peculiarly oppressed group-Gender, Crime, and Empire argues that convict men and women in fact had much in common. Gender, Crime and Empire: Convicts, Settlers and the State in Early Colonial Australia Studies in Imperialism.

Gender, Crime and Empire: Convicts, Settlers and the State in Early Colonial Australia. This article describes the place of Women's and Gender Studies programmes in Australian universities as a way of thinking about the place of feminism in the academy

Gender, Crime and Empire: Convicts, Settlers and the State in Early Colonial Australia. Manchester: Manchester University Press. This article describes the place of Women's and Gender Studies programmes in Australian universities as a way of thinking about the place of feminism in the academy. The narrative traces a contradictory domain in which women, feminist scholarship and Women's and Gender Studies are enmeshed. Studies in imperialism (Manchester, England).

Gender, crime and empire : convicts, settlers and the state in early colonial Australia. Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press ; New York : Distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave, 2007. Penal colonies - Australia - Tasmania - History - 19th century. 9780719066986 (hardback).

Gender, Crime and Empire. Convicts, Settlers and the State in Early Colonial Australia (Studies in Imperialism). Published November 27, 2007 by Manchester University Press.

Between 1803 and 1853, some 80,000 convicts were transported to Van Diemen's Land. Revising established models of the colonies, which tend to depict convict women as a peculiarly oppressed group, Gender, crime and empire argues that convict men and women in fact shared much in common. Placing men and women, ideas about masculinity, femininity, sexuality and the body, in comparative perspective, this book argues that historians must take fuller account of class to understand the relationships between gender and power. The book explores the ways in which ideas about fatherhood and household order initially informed the state's model of order, and the reasons why this foundered. It considers the shifting nature of state policies towards courtship, relationships and attempts at family formation which subsequently became matters of class conflict. It goes on to explore the ways in which ideas about gender and family informed liberal and humanitarian critiques of the colonies from the 1830s and 1840s and colonial demands for abolition and self-government.