mostraligabue
» » Agrarian Revolution

ePub Agrarian Revolution download

by Jeffery M. Paige

ePub Agrarian Revolution download
Author:
Jeffery M. Paige
ISBN13:
978-0029235805
ISBN:
0029235804
Language:
Publisher:
Free Press; 1st edition (January 8, 1976)
Subcategory:
Sociology
ePub file:
1798 kb
Fb2 file:
1422 kb
Other formats:
docx mobi azw lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
681

Agrarian Revolution has been added to your Cart. The distinctions Paige makes between different rural systems are very important to understanding what opportunities and constraints social movements face.

Agrarian Revolution has been added to your Cart. Too often, scholars just lump all rural class structures together and attempt to analyze them all as being more or less the same. Unfortunately, Paige's underlying theoretical perspective-a synthesis of orthodox Marxism and rational choice theory-is somewhat reductionist.

Find out more about Agrarian Revolution by Jeffrey M. Paige at Simon & Schuster.

Agrarian Revolution book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every. Jeffery Paige's Agrarian Revolution is that type of rare work in history or sociology that seeks a grand unifying theory of history much like Barrington Moore's Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy, and Karl Polanyi's The Great Transformation. The Agrarian Revolution is an example of science at its best.

Simon and Schuster, 1978 - Social Science - 435 pages. Agrarian revolution: social movements and export agriculture in the. Jeffery M. Paige Snippet view - 1978. Paige Snippet view - 1975. View all . Common terms and phrases.

Jeffery Paige shows that the crises of the 1980s had their roots in the .

Jeffery Paige shows that the crises of the 1980s had their roots in the economic and political crises of the 1930s, when the revolutionary left challenged the ruling coffee elites of all three countries. The heart of the book is his conversations with sixty-two leaders of fifty-eight elite dynasties, who for the first time tell their own stories of the experience of Central American revolution. Paige's analysis challenges not only Barrington Moore's influential theory of dictatorship and democracy but also contemporary approaches to "transitions to democracy.

The book has an excellent historical analysis of. the 1930s revolutionary movements led by Augusto.

For example, the agrarians are big landowners, who tend to be of Spanish conquistador descent and. quite conservative. The book has an excellent historical analysis of. César Sandino, Agustín FarabundoMartí, and Manuel.

New York: The Free Press, 1975. New York: The Free Press, 1975.

Agrarian Revolution: Social Movements and Export Agriculture in the Underdeveloped World. Authors: Richard F. Salisbury.

  • First, a warning. This is not casual reading. This is a dense academic tome, with detailed statistical analysis and in-depth case studies. And the writing style is pretty dry, although there are occasional, unexpected touches of humor (for instance, pg. 236: "Many bush traders felt that after years of unrewarding trade the millenium had finally arrived and rushed to invest in consumer goods including foreign automobiles and even refrigerators, which, considering the absence of electrification in the region, were of limited utility."). If you want to get the main gist of the book, you can probably get away with reading only the first and last chapters.

    For those who are interested in the political economy of social movements, particularly in the third world, this is a valuable work. Paige looks at the various class systems in rural areas that export cash crops to the world market and breaks them down into four main types, while noting there are many intermediary varieties. He discusses the barriers different sorts of class systems can create to organizing--for instance, on what he refers to as the commercial hacienda, the peasants have little of their own organization horizontally with each other; instead, social ties run vertically between peasants and the estate-owner, which is a major obstacle to social movement organization. Typically, some outside force needs to get involved to stimulate a movement. Paige also analyzes why some class systems produce revolutionary movements and some movements that are reformist in their goals (even though they may officially adopt a radical ideology like socialism). For instance, in large commercial plantations (often owned by multinational corporations), the owners can afford to invest in their estates, boosting productivity; this means they have some economic wiggle room and can bargain with labor unions, making concessions to them. Thus, plantation systems produce reformist labor movements. Sharecropping systems on the other hand, involve local estate-owners whose major source of wealth is their land and can't afford to invest anything in their land to make it more productive; they are locked in a zero-sum game with their tenants. This pushes the tenants to revolutionary socialism, since expropriation of the estate-owners' lands is the only way they can better their condition. The distinctions Paige makes between different rural systems are very important to understanding what opportunities and constraints social movements face. Too often, scholars just lump all rural class structures together and attempt to analyze them all as being more or less the same.

    Unfortunately, Paige's underlying theoretical perspective--a synthesis of orthodox Marxism and rational choice theory--is somewhat reductionist. According to Paige, class structure is the driving force in social dynamics and people make their choices based on decisions about economic gain. Both these things are important, but they are certainly not the whole picture. Paige treats political organization and social movement organization as both being derivative of class structure, even though it's pretty clear from his case studies that they are pretty important. And, because of his rational actor orientation, culture completely disappears as anything than local color. This contrasts with Scott's The Moral Economy of the Peasant where values play an important part--in conjunction with the changing political-economic system--in the emergence of social movements.

    Nonetheless, despite his somewhat reductionist theoretical position, Paige's overall analysis is invaluable.

  • To lead with some of the strongest evidence about the importance of this book, is to say that it was awarded the highest
    honor, the Sorokin award, by the American Sociological Assn.
    So why in the 20thC did some areas of the Third World spawn violent communist revolutions and others did not? Paige, using what now has become know as "rational choice Marxism", (which is the use of models that are prevalent in economics and game theory in order to illuminate class conflict, historical change, etc.), developed a theory which explains why some countries, for example, Vietnam and Angola spawned communist peasant revolutions while other equally or more oppressed ex-colonial nations did not.
    Paige argues that the contours of politcal conflict are based on the pattern (or "mode") of agricultural production, and not because of "communist subversion". In short, tenant farming created a zero-sum game in which agrarian elites were increasingly driven to brutally extract surplus value from peasants via taxation and land appropriation.
    Paige's work spawned a large literature within the field of peasants studies, including many, joining a very old debate, who criticized Paige for being too economistic in his analysis. In any case, it remains an important landmark in sociology and continues the traditions of political sociology associated with Barrington Moore, Theda Skocpol et al.