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ePub Waiting for the Dalai Lama: Stories from All Sides of the Tibetan Debate download

by Annelie Rozeboom

ePub Waiting for the Dalai Lama: Stories from All Sides of the Tibetan Debate download
Author:
Annelie Rozeboom
ISBN13:
978-9881774200
ISBN:
9881774209
Language:
Publisher:
Blacksmith Books (February 16, 2011)
Subcategory:
Sociology
ePub file:
1615 kb
Fb2 file:
1711 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf azw lit
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
315

It contains much more than I have indicated, also about the condition of Tibetan women and their democratic association to improve their circumstances. Almost everything that's revealed in Waiting For the Dalai Lama sends extra rays of light into dark corners of the Tibet debate, taking readers closer to an objective, accurate assessment. Will anyone else in Asia publish a more forthright and revealing book this year?

After obtaining a degree in journalism, Annelie Rozeboom went to China for twelve months, and ended up staying eleven years. Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Annelie Rozeboom's books.

After obtaining a degree in journalism, Annelie Rozeboom went to China for twelve months, and ended up staying eleven years  .

To find out, Annelie Rozeboom interviewed Tibetans inside and outside Tibet, as well as Chinese and Western observers and the Dalai Lama himself. A collection of very different viewpoints which look at Tibet from all angles. As these people explain their experiences, the reader sees why they think the way they do, and why the Tibetans and Chinese have taken such opposing positions.

Journalist Annelie Rozeboom interviewed Tibetan people inside and outside Tibet, Chinese . Misinformation abounds on both sides, from all governments

Journalist Annelie Rozeboom interviewed Tibetan people inside and outside Tibet, Chinese residents, Western observers, and the Dalai Lama to try to find out. all members. Rozeboom subtitles this book 'Stories from all sides of the Tibetan debate', as if to give all stories equal consideration, but Rozeboom shows bias for Tibetans-in-exile and an independant Tibet. Misinformation abounds on both sides, from all governments. In the West, the situation in Tibet is often looked at in black and white, but this book proves to be much more nuanced.

Not a dry history of Tibet. 60 hours of interviewing . Beautifully executed and a great learning experience on both sides of the conversation.

Chinese-speaking journalist Annelie Rozeboom worked in China for ten years. You will need a pdf reader to view this excerpt. She interviewed Tibetans inside and outside Tibet, Chinese residents and Western observers. Chapter 1. Waiting for the Dalai Lama: Stories from all sides of the Tibetan debate quantity.

By: Annelie Rozeboom. Publisher: Blacksmith Books. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to Waiting for the Dalai Lama: Stories from All Sides of the Tibetan Debate

By: Annelie Rozeboom. Print ISBN: 9789881774200, 9881774209. eText ISBN: 9789881613820, 9881613825. To find out, Annelie Rozeboom interviewed Tibetans inside and outside Tibet, as well as Chinese and Western observers and the Dalai Lama himself. You are leaving VitalSource and being redirected to Waiting for the Dalai Lama: Stories from All Sides of the Tibetan Debate.

Stories from All Sides of the Tibetan Debate. Books related to Waiting for the Dalai Lama. My Spiritual Autobiography.

Sold & shipped byDiscover Books. Paperback, Natl Book Network, 2010, ISBN13 9789881774200, ISBN10 9881774209. Tell us if something is incorrect.

Why does the issue of Tibet rouse such passions on both sides? To find out, Annelie Rozeboom interviewed Tibetans inside and outside Tibet, as well as Chinese and Western observers and the Dalai Lama himself. As these people explain their experiences, the reader sees why they think the way they do, and why the Tibetans and Chinese have taken such opposing positions. A collection of very different viewpoints which look at Tibet from all angles.
  • People waiting for the Dalai Lama's return to Tibet had better be even more patient than they already are. This book introduces the reader to many different personal stories.

  • I received this book for free in return for a review.

    I've always been interested in Tibet but knew very little about the country. I knew of course who the Dalai Lama was and that he was in exile, but that was mostly it.

    I'm now much more knowledgeable about Tibet. The book is written in a fresh, journalistic style, as befitting the author's profession. She lived in China for ten years. For the book she interviewed various Tibetans/Chinese and got their viewpoints and stories, which are written down in their own words. Thus, some of the information given is slightly conflicting, since everyone had their own angles.

    Perhaps I should first make it clear, in case there's anyone out there that doesn't know, that Tibet is now a part of China and strictly controlled by the Chinese, while Tibetans and the Dalai Lama want independence.

    The book is well-written, easy to read and extremely informative.

    We learn about the poverty of the Tibetans, Tibet being described as "a country of beggars". The children receive little or poor education, and even if there is a school in a village, "you might have to learn Chinese first" in order to understand the teaching. Many parents send their children "on a two-week walk through snow and ice" to get an education in India (as far as I understand).

    We're told about the Panchen Lama, Choekyi Gyaltsen, who apparently was the Tibetan leader after the Dalai Lama's exit. (I'd never previously heard of him.) He is now deceased but spent his life criticizing China's policies in Tibet and trying to modernize his country. "He asked for more environmental protection, more freedom, and more money. He denounced the harsh punishments after the revolts, and described how the communes during the Great Leap Forward led to famine".

    But the Tibetans disagree about the merits and achievements of the Panchen Lama.

    Buddhism is tolerated in Tibet, and the Tibetans are allowed to worship. But in the new Tibet "there is no more deep religious study". The Chinese effect impressive restorations of monasteries and the palace of the Dalai Lama but the monks feel oppressed since they live under strict restrictions. If a monastery or a Buddhist teacher becomes too powerful, the Chinese authorities start a campaign.

    The Tibetans have a great belief in spirits and demons. Even the Dalai Lama consults the state oracle, the Nechung, before deciding any major issue.

    There is a chapter about the exile government in Dharamsala in India. A large community of Tibetans lives here together with the Dalai Lama. Tibetan children are sent here to receive an education in the Tibetans schools that have been set up. Nowadays, the Dalai Lama does not insist on independence for Tibet but has put forward a peace plan called the Middle Path, whose main suggestion is that while waiting for complete independence , Tibet could be an autonomous region for a while. "China would take care of Tibet's foreign affairs and military defence and the Dalai Lama would go back as a religious leader." He has also several other stipulations, of course.

    The book concludes with the writer's audience with the Dalai Lama, a fitting close to her account.

    It contains much more than I have indicated, also about the condition of Tibetan women and their democratic association to improve their circumstances.

    If there is a negative feature of the book, it might be that with all the various persons expressing their viewpoints, one can get a bit confused about who is talking. And unless you're extremely knowledgeable about the area, you might be unclear about where the various places are, in China, Tibet or India, for instance. Perhaps the author should have included a few maps showing the areas she's discussing.

    I absolutely recommend that you read this book if you have any interest in Tibet - it was an enjoyable read for me.

  • I was promised and given stories from all sides of the Tibetan debate in this book. I do try to keep an open mind and examine all sides and perspectives.

    I don't know - is it because I'm getting old? Everything I read seems to be something I've already read - nothing new - for example:

    Chinese torturing Tibetan priests, nuns and "civilians" - I'm hearing Cheney in the background talking about how torture is ok and necessary and helpful.

    Chinese saying they educated Tibetans who had previously been 98% illiterate? I'm hearing European Americans talk about the schools they built for Native Americans. You know - the ones they forced the children to attend after taking them from their parents? Where they were punished for speaking their own language and given new names?

    Hearing Chinese talk about the barren mountaintops they gave to Tibetans? Have you BEEN on an American Indian Reservation that isn't barren land?

    The Chinese are cutting down whole forests and leaving deserts in their wake in Tibet so that the people can no longer plant? Hmmm. You mean like taking oil or other natural resources from other countries? Like destroying rain forests for Burger King and leaving natives to starve?

    There are too many parallels between the way the U.S. treats and has treated other cultures to make this a very comfortable read for an American. Not comfortable, but highly recommended for those interested in other cultures and especially Tibet. This author spent ten years in China and knows what she is talking about - she has seen it all.

    You very well may learn something new from reading this VERY informative and well documented book. Additionally, the personal stories, placed in context very well, make for interesting reading.