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ePub You're Missin' a Great Game download

by Whitey Herzog

ePub You're Missin' a Great Game download
Author:
Whitey Herzog
ISBN13:
978-0425174753
ISBN:
0425174751
Language:
Publisher:
Berkley; Reprint edition (March 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Baseball
ePub file:
1485 kb
Fb2 file:
1627 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.1
Votes:
937

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You're Missin' a Great Game book. Whitey Herzog was perhaps THE foremost proponent of "small ball" or the classic National League game: baserunning, relief pitching, defense, and manufacturing runs. Tellingly, he wrote this book towards the end of what we now know to be the steroids era of baseball - when even his beloved Cardinals were infatuated with the long ball to the exclusion of less-photogenic fundamentals - and hence it's a strongly-worded plea for a baseball aesthetic that seemed in danger of dying out.

You're Missin' a Great Game : From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. Whitey takes baseball apart but manages to provide constructive ways to improve the game. by Whitey Herzog and Jonathan Pitts. Cardinal fans will absolutely love this book but anyone who enjoys the game is in for a real lesson and a great experience with this book. Cardinal Fans must have! By Thriftbooks. com User, September 6, 1999. This book provides a blunt intriguing outlook on baseball that can only be the work of one of the greatest minds in the game. A must for any Cardinal fan. 0.

You're Missin' a Great Game. From Casey to Ozzie, the Magic of Baseball and How to Get It Back. At its best, baseball calls on a wide array of subtle skills, rewarding the teams that know how to play the game better than their opponents over the long 162-game season. Whitey Herzog learned those skills under the tutelage of Cesey Stengel in the Yankees' training camps of the 1950s: how to take a lead; which side of the cutoff man to aim for; when to take an extra base depending on whether the outfielder throws left-handed or right-handed; the best ways to turn or prevent a double play.

The former Cardinal takes readers on a fun, nostalgic tour of the game, covering the highs and lows of the game as he has witnessed it. Reprint. Dimensions 10. 4 x 17. 8 x 3. 2mm 20. 2g. Publication date 08 Mar 2004. Publisher Penguin Putnam Inc.

Whitey Herzog learned those skills under the tutelage of Cesey Stengel in the Yank.

Dorrel Norman Elvert "Whitey" Herzog (/ˈhɜːrzɒɡ/; born November 9, 1931) is a former Major League Baseball manager. Born in New Athens, Illinois, he made his debut as a player in 1956 with the Washington Senators

Dorrel Norman Elvert "Whitey" Herzog (/ˈhɜːrzɒɡ/; born November 9, 1931) is a former Major League Baseball manager. Born in New Athens, Illinois, he made his debut as a player in 1956 with the Washington Senators. After his playing career ended in 1963, Herzog went on to perform a variety of roles in Major League Baseball, including scout, manager, general manager and farm system director.

Artist: The Whitey Herzogs. Album: Cool Out. Release year: 2004. The Whitey Herzogs - You're The One Chords Of Relief: A Magic City Relief Effort for the Victims of Hurricane Katrina, 2005 02:46. Artist: The Whitey Herzogs.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. A good condtion book may have library markings on cover and notes or highlighting sentences on pages but the text cannot be unreadable

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. A good condtion book may have library markings on cover and notes or highlighting sentences on pages but the text cannot be unreadable. The extra supplements such as CD, DVD and Dust jacket are not promised with a good condition book. Good customer service and fast shipping.

You're Missin' a Great Game by Whitey Herzog. Herzog propels us through a charmed life-a baseball life-with hundreds of the sort of stories that would make everyone in the bar shut up and listen. The gossip from his days with the Royals and Cardinals alone makes the book a must.

The former Cardinal takes readers on a fun, nostalgic tour of the game, covering the highs and lows of the game as he has witnessed it. Reprint.
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  • I gotta laugh at people offended by Whitey's brashness and egotism. What a sterile world these people live in. Whitey's personality was what endeared him to Cardinals fans in the '80s and continues to endear him to Cardinals fans even today. Of course it helped that his teams won a few games. Redbirds fans still feel like Whitey is their personal fishing buddy. This book is a wonderful rehash of baseball in the '80s, notably Cardinals baseball. Fans of other teams will not likely be so moved by the book. So what? There are a million baseball books out there, and this one is for Cardinals or maybe Royals fans. Whitey may think he knows everything about baseball, and that's part of his charm. Every page is entertaining, filled with anecdotes and personalities.

  • This book has a few weird ideas (World Series stadium and bingo parlor?; teaching the spitball to upgrade the Rockies' pitching staff?) and several factual/numerical errors. Part of the time it reads like an advertisement for Whitey, Inc. He also plays the "should've" game when he seems to believe that his teams should have won two or three additional World Series. But, you expect this sort of opinionation in a clearly subjective book.
    I have to agree with just about everything else Herzog says. His thesis is that the wild expansion of revenues available to SOME baseball teams is not only wrecking competitive balance, but is also changing the way the game is played, resulting in a sloppy style of baseball that revolves around the home run. For example, last year's Cardinal team, led by Mark McGwire, set a new National League home run record, but finished with only an 84-78 record! In contrast, look at the style of play in the NFL, which is more varied and complex than ever, due in part to the fact that wealthy franchises can't outspend the rest of the league and bowl teams over with talent alone. I'm certainly not a total fan of NFL-style socialism, but baseball's distribution of revenues is way too skewed in favor of certain teams. Herzog's remedies may or may not work, but, if changes aren't made, lets see what happens when lockout/strike time rolls around again. Or, maybe we'll see a franchise or two go belly-up.
    If I had to describe this book in one word, it would be "timely". While most baseball people are still basking in the glory of last year's "Greatest Season Ever", Whitey plays the role of the canary in the coal mine as he delves into baseball's deeply troubled underpinnings. On the bright side. baseball has survived management by successive generations of blithering idiots for over a hundred years. Whether you're an optimist (Yankee fan) or a pessimist (Pirate-Expo-Twin-Royal fan), read this book now so you will have a better grasp of the problem when baseball's financial and stylistic walking pneumonia flares up and sends the Game back to the intensive care unit.

  • This treatise by Whitey Herzog is like the White Rat himself; straightforward, gruff, and thought-provoking. Herzog criticizes today's homer-centered, steroid-based play, recounts his years as manager and general manager, and analyzes many additional factors. A skilled handler of pitching staffs, Herzog describes his actions here in readable detail. He also offers views on many facets of baseball, including finances, labor relations, franchise competitiveness, trades, the designated hitter, player development, teams he managed in the playoffs (Kansas City) and World Series (St. Louis), etc. Herzog blames the Cardinal loss in the 1985 Series on that famous bad call, but this is only probable, as KC still had two good hitters due up in a one-run game. Herzog also suggests a host of changes for the game, many sensible, others debatable. Readers might not always agree with Herzog or his salty language, but his words should make them think as deeply about the game as he does.

    This slightly-dated (1999) book remains a valuable and fast-paced read, but with enough factual errors (Lou Brock stole 118 bases not 114, Bud Grant lost four Super Bowls not three, Marvin Miller became union head in 1966 not the 1970's) that one wonders why publishers seldom assign to their baseball books editors versed in sports trivia. Still, despite minor flaws, this is a thoughtful look by a man who'se love for baseball comes through loud and clear.

  • As a baseball fan in general, and a Cardinal fan in particular, you've got to love Whitey. I almost went into mourning when he quit managing the Cardinals in '90, and reading this book is just like having him back. The only problem is that he isn't the GM and Manager of the Cardinals right now! If the "powers to be" in baseball had any sense, they would hire this man as the Supreme Commander and let him go crazy. Nothing but good would happen. While I don't necessarily agree with all of his ideas (what's up with the World Series/Bingo Parlor stadium idea?) he has the track record and the insight to give baseball the kind of vision it needs to correct it's flaws. Whitey is one of us.... a regular guy who has also seen and done most everything there is to do in the game of baseball. Not only does baseball need him, but the fans want him and his style of play. If I had 1 tip to give Cardinals ownership it would be to bring him back tomorrow and let him run the show. Before too long, we'd see the Runnin' Redbirds, good fundamental baseball, winning seasons, and 3 million + attendance figures. Great book by a great guy. If you like baseball, you can't miss this one.