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ePub Now I Can Die in Peace: How ESPN's Sports Guy Found Salvation, with a Little Help from Nomar, Pedro, Shawshank and the 2004 download

by Bill Simmons

ePub Now I Can Die in Peace: How ESPN's Sports Guy Found Salvation, with a Little Help from Nomar, Pedro, Shawshank and the 2004 download
Author:
Bill Simmons
ISBN13:
978-1933060132
ISBN:
1933060131
Language:
Publisher:
ESPN; English Language edition (September 5, 2006)
Category:
Subcategory:
Baseball
ePub file:
1982 kb
Fb2 file:
1894 kb
Other formats:
lrf mbr docx lit
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
242

Now I Can Die in Peace: How ESPN's Sports Guy Found Salvation, With a Little Help From Nomar, Pedro, Shawshank and the 2004 Red Sox is a 2006 sports anthology of original columns written by ESPN sports writer Bill Simmons. Simmons, a passionate.

Now I Can Die in Peace: How ESPN's Sports Guy Found Salvation, With a Little Help From Nomar, Pedro, Shawshank and the 2004 Red Sox is a 2006 sports anthology of original columns written by ESPN sports writer Bill Simmons.

The Red Sox won the World Series. To Citizen No. 1 of Red Sox Nation, those seven words meant "No more ‘1918’ chants. No more smug glances from Yankee fans. No more worrying about living an entire life - that’s eighty years, followed. Plot Summary: What this book is about is a guy named Bill Simmons being a HUGE sports fan. Particularly a Red Sox/ New England fan. He really focuses on the Red Sox most.

Bill Simmons writes the popular Sports Guy column for ESPN. com's Page 2 and ESPN: The Magazine. A former sports reporter for the Boston Herald, he founded the award-winning bostonsportsguy. He commutes between his home in Los Angeles and Fenway Park. If you strip away the occassionally on target pop culture references and the more accurately directed humor, this book is the story of the love affair of Simmons, his family and his city for a team. Part of that sentence is stolen from Ken Coleman's 1967 Impossible Dream narration.

Now I Can Die in Peace: How ESPN's Sports Guy Found Salvation, With a Little Help From Nomar, Pedro, Shawshank and the 2004 Red Sox. Author. One interesting article Simmons included in the book is not about baseball at all; it's his famous "Silence of the Rams" column that was written after the New England Patriots defeated St. Louis to win Super Bowl XXXVI. Simmons wrote that if the "Fredo of the Boston sports scene" could win a championship, then it was possible for the Red Sox to someday end their then-84-year-long title drought.

Published by ESPN, 2006. Condition: Good Soft cover. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . Standard shipping can on occasion take up to 30 days for delivery. List this Seller's Books. Payment Methods accepted by seller.

Bill Simmons’ highly anticipated The Book Of Basketball, coming out this October, seems to finally have a cover. Sports lovers will love this book by Jack McCallum, retired senior writer for Sports Illustrated and grad school buddy of mine! for phoenix/steve nash fans. another story of "what could have been". Seven Seconds or Less.

Manufacturer: ESPN Release date: 1 October 2005 ISBN-10 : 1933060050 ISBN-13: 9781933060057. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

book by Bill Simmons. 1 of Red Sox Nation, those seven words meant "No more 1918 chants. No more worrying about living an entire life - thats eighty years, followed by death - without seeing the Red Sox win a Series. Now I Can Die in Peace is a collection of Simmons' articles from 1999 to 2004. It chronicles events such as Pedro Martínez's 1999 Cy Young season, the loss to the New York Yankees in the 2003 ALCS, and the 2004 ALCS, when the Red Sox won the last 4 games after they lost the first three games of the series.

The New York Times bestseller Now I Can Die in Peace is now available in paperback with a new afterword (and more footnotes) by the author

"The Red Sox won the World Series." To Citizen No. 1 of Red Sox Nation, those seven words meant "No more 1918 chants. No more smug glances from Yankee fans. No more worrying about living an entire life -- that's eighty years, followed by death -- without seeing the Red Sox win a Series." But once he was able -- finally -- to type those life-changing words, Bill Simmons decided to look back at his "Sports Guy" columns for the last five years to find out how the miracle came to pass. And that's where the trouble began.

The result is Now I Can Die in Peace, a hilarious and fresh new look at some of the best sportswriting in America, with sharp, critical commentary (and fresh insights) from the guy who wrote it in the first place.

  • "...And he was one-third of the infamous 1996 Boston coaching staff (along with Tim Johnson and Kevin Kennedy)that stood motionless on the top step of the dugout, wearing matching bushy mustaches, Raybans and warmup jackets, looking like they were participating in a photo shoot for gay baseball porn."

    The book contains articles written between 1998 and 2006 (in the new paperback), and it covers those Red Sox teams pretty extensively, with a HUGE focus on the 2003-2004 teams. Even so, Simmons occaionally provides the readers with tales from earlier Red Sox seasons (and other Boston sport teams too).

    He's not an objective columnist by any standard: he lives and dies with the Red Sox, and it makes his book both personal and entertaining. Through his writing, we get to know his friends, wife and most significantly, his father. He weaves in college anecdotes, family arguments, weddings, drunkalogues, and a myriad of pop-culture references into most of his articles. They fit in and add to his topics.

    It's a fun book. A must for any Red Sox fan, and along with "Mind Game", it's the best book about the 2004 Red Sox.

    One final note: I'm a Yankee fan.

  • The Sports Guy (SG) Bill Simmons comes out with his first book about the Red Sox winning the world series. The only way I could have enjoyed it more was if it was all new material. I can only hope that he decides to write another book, although that would cut into his column writing, that is all new stuff.

    I am a religious reader of his ESPN.com page 2 column and even though I had read almost all of his old columns, it was great to reread them, especially with the added footnotes.

    There is something about his sense of humor, much like Chuck Klosterman, that just makes me laugh. In the book he details his life as a sports fan growing up in Boston and then his eventual move out to L.A. Excellent read especially in the restroom.

  • As much of Bill Simmons' work does, this book displayed the Boston-based sports writer's love of his hometown Red Sox and was written from the perspective that only real Simmons fans can understand. Simmons has a writing style that not many can match, given his sense of humor and sports knowledge. Put it this way: I'm a Yankees fan and I couldn't put this book down.

  • Following the 2004 season, The Sports Guy wrote the best of the many books about the Red Sox championship run. In preparation for opening day of 2009, he has revised it to include 100 pages of updated columns.

    Simmons starts the new section with an analysis of how Sox fans confronted a new and uncursed existence. He asks "What happens when your identity gets stripped away, when you get the chance to start from scratch?" He follows this with: a comparison of Larry Bird and Big Papi, coverage of the Dice-K acquisition, the 2007 championship, the Rocket and the Roids, a defense of Manny being Manny and the 2008 loss to the Rays. Through it all, Simmons writing is more about what it is to be a fan than it is about the team or the game.

    If you strip away the occassionally on target pop culture references and the more accurately directed humor, this book is the story of the love affair of Simmons, his family and his city for a team. (Part of that sentence is stolen from Ken Coleman's 1967 Impossible Dream narration.) The Sports Guy proudly wears his passion on his sleeve: "I think like a fan, write like a fan and try like hell to keep it that way." It is a lifelong relationship: "You love sports most when you are 16, then you love it a little less every year."

    Reading these columns, another diehard instinctively feels an affinity for Simmons and appreciates his commitment, knowledge and intermittant suffering. This is made easier because the author often recognizes when he has stepped across the line that separates the healthfully obsessed from the not quite well (One of his footnotes points out, "This paragraph made me sound like an a**hole.") He doesn't always know when he is wandering on the borderline of the geek but that lack of concern and authenticity is part of his charm. He is, above all else, one of us.

    In The Natural, Robert Redford's Roy Hobbs character asks the sportswriter played by Robert Duvall if he ever played the game. The answer: "No. But I made it more fun to watch." So does Simmons. (This is my attempt at pop culture relevance.) In the 70s and 80s, I didn't consider a Sox season over until I had read what Roger Angell and Peter Gammons wrote about it. That mantle has passed to Simmons. And, apparently, he is not going to disappoint. His plan is to "re-release this book with more chapters every few years, kinda like what God did with the bible."

    Keep releasing them. We'll keep reading.

  • I have read some of the articles before but not many of them. But I have followed him on ESPN and he is one of the most entertaining sportswriters that I know. I don't even like the Red Sox because I'm an Oakland fan, but he does make it very enjoyable. Definitely a must read if you like the Red Sox but a highly recommended one just based on his writing style!

  • I'm a huge Bill Simmons fan, and have rooted for the Red Sox since 1978 (when I first visited Fenway - kind of an unfortunate year to become a fan, huh?). I think I was a bit disappointed because I had already read many of these articles on ESPN's website, and was hoping for something more. Though I still enjoyed his writing, as a book - it was disjointed and a little less enjoyable. I wish he had either written an entirely new book, or at least connected the dots a little better. Still, as a Red Sox/Bill Simmons fan, it was enjoyable, and I would recommend this book to others owith similar tastes.

  • Bought this for my son at his request, he is not a reader! He does enough reading of his college books, so to read for pleasure I was surprised, He did not put this book down! 23 yrs I have never seen him get into a book , but he does like the author , so wanted to give his books a whirl, I bought him the set , the first one he read and took the other back to school with him.

  • I'm only about 60 something pages into the book and it's everything that I hoped it would be. Now I see that an even newer issue is out and well that pisses me off. I almost feel like I'm entitled to the newer content for free. Will I buy the newer book? NO. Will I wonder what I'm missing out on? YES. I just can't win. Hopefully my Red Sox do just the opposite this year. Go Sox!!