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ePub The Perfect Season: Why 1998 Was Baseball's Greatest Year download

by Tim McCarver

ePub The Perfect Season: Why 1998 Was Baseball's Greatest Year download
Author:
Tim McCarver
ISBN13:
978-0812991710
ISBN:
0812991710
Language:
Publisher:
Villard (March 30, 1999)
Category:
Subcategory:
Baseball
ePub file:
1162 kb
Fb2 file:
1327 kb
Other formats:
mobi lrf azw lrf
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
986

One of baseball's most outspoken and articulate voices in the booth, Tim McCarver isn't one to mince words in print either. The year 1998 wasn't just the greatest in baseball history," he states emphatically in The Perfect Season, "it was the greatest any sport has ever enjoyed.

One of baseball's most outspoken and articulate voices in the booth, Tim McCarver isn't one to mince words in print either.

The Perfect Season book. McCarver is baseball's best analyst and, as he showed with Tim McCarver's Baseball for Brain Surgeons and Other Fans, he is as eloquent and witty on the page as he is behind the microphone. In The Perfect Season, McCarver revels in the homer race and the Yankees but shows that the season contained so much more, ensuring it will stand out as the best there has been. Nineteen Ninety-Eight was the greatest season in baseball history. While Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa engaged in an epic duel for baseball's most coveted individual record - Roger Maris's 61 home runs, the New York Yankees set new standards for team excellence and established themselves as one of the greatest clubs in the history of the game.

The Perfect Season: Why 1998 Was Baseball's Greatest Year. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

The book covers a wide range of the season's many outstanding achievements. There are moments of tremendous insight; McCarver is probably the best baseball analyst in broadcasting today, and it is hard to imagine hearing him over an extended period without learning something new about the game. He is nothing less than stunning in his.

Tim McCarver, major league baseball’s premier analyst, has been surprising and delighting viewers for years with his remarkable insight. Fans who once were content to merely watch baseball were stimulated into wanting to think baseball as well. This book is a gold mine for all fans, from brain surgeons and rocket scientists to beginners who want to start with the basics. Even major leaguers will be able to pick up some pointers.

McCarver is baseball's best analyst and, as he showed with Tim McCarver's Baseball for Brain Surgeons and .

McCarver is baseball's best analyst and, as he showed with Tim McCarver's Baseball for Brain Surgeons and Other Fans, he is as eloquent and witty on the page as he is behind the microphone. With it, fans can remember the season in which they got back into the habit of watching the game and reestablished baseball as America's Pastime.

Pick a year, any year, and declare it the best season in baseball history. And Luke Epplin says there are just a few more steps to follow. It should be noted that McCarver published this book in the afterglow of that giddy season, before innocent sports fans even knew what the initials HGH stood for.

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Опубликовано: 18 мая 2018 г. Tim McCarver on Bob Gibson's 1968 season: "To me, it's the . Koufax Strikes Out Mantle. Tim McCarver on Bob Gibson's 1968 season: "To me, it's the greatest year in the history of the game.

Nineteen Ninety-Eight was the greatest season in baseball history. While Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa engaged in an epic duel for baseball's most coveted individual record -- Roger Maris's 61 home runs, the New York Yankees set new standards for team excellence and established themselves as one of the greatest clubs in the history of the game.        Tim McCarver broadcast the climax of each of these extraordinary achievements and is uniquely positioned as a former player, a commentator, and writer to put 1998 into its proper perspective. McCarver is baseball's best analyst and, as he showed with Tim McCarver's Baseball for Brain Surgeons and Other Fans, he is as eloquent and witty on the page as he is behind the microphone. In The Perfect Season, McCarver revels in the homer race and the Yankees but shows that the season contained so much more, ensuring it will stand out as the best there has been. Star players performing to the height of their powers broke records set by true legends of baseball, linking today's players with those who exist somewhere between myth and memory: Ruth and Cobb; Gehrig and Mays. The Perfect Season describes the accomplishments of veterans like Juan Gonzalez, Roger Clemens, Ken Griffey, Jr., Mike Piazza, and Barry Bonds, and of the exceptional young players who hold the future of the game in their hands: Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Nomar Garciaparra, and Kerry Wood. Tim McCarver also laments the passing of some friends and colleagues: Richie Ashburn, Harry Caray, and Dan Quisenberry, and celebrates the careers of some stars who retired after the 1998 season.         The Perfect Season is a comprehensive account of 1998 and the perfect souvenir of baseball's greatest year. With it, fans can remember the season in which they got back into the habit of watching the game and reestablished baseball as America's Pastime.  From the Hardcover edition.
  • I am a big Phil Fulmer fan and was anxious to read this book once I found it on Amazon. The book emphasizes the character of the team, their toughness and how they molded themselves together to be a true team. I enjoyed reading about this development from the coach's perspective, but would have also appreciated more discussion about the individual games in the season. Each game had its compliment of pictures showing the various practice charts used to prepare the team; I found these to be frankly irrelevant to the story.

    All in all, it is worth reading. It does give the reader a good glimpse into how a championship team is built and what players need to do to ensure success on the field. I would just have liked a bit more information and discussion of the game day performance of the team and how all of the practices led to their victories.

  • Wait now...why are some of the reviews submitted referencing baseball? This book is about Coach Fulmer, a very fine college football coach and individual who was good to his players...just ask P. Manning, Arian Foster, Jason Whitten, etc. Phil got a bum deal and the Vols still havent recovered.

  • It was inevitable that following the spectacular baseball season of 1998, that there would be books released that would try to immortalize the accomplishments and memories of that year. The two most notable ones were "Summer of 98" by Mike Lupica and "The Perfect Season" by Tim McCarver. McCarver is a long-time baseball analyst on a myriad of networks. Often bombastic and overblown with his commentary, he hits the 1998 season right on the mark. It may very well be 'the perfect season'. In the aftermath of the 1994 baseball strike, Major League Baseball had struggled to regain its foothold in the American psyche. As recently as 1997, underachieving seasons by so many teams led to a World Series that, while a dramatic 7 games, was also a horribly ugly matchup between Cleveland and Florida. The only glimmer of hope in that season was the home run tears that Mark McGwire and Ken Griffey Jr. went on. Their challenges to the Roger Maris' home run record entertained the nation, but ultimately both fell short, with Griffey hitting 56 and McGwire hitting 58. Little else in that season did anything to attract fans back to the park. The 1998 season dawned with a auspicious feel to it. Mark McGwire was going to have a full season in St. Louis to go after Maris' record and there were some exciting prospects coming up in the minor leagues. But, few could have expected the incredible form this year would take. From Mark McGwire's Opening Day grand slam until the final out of the World Series, 1998 had it all. In "The Perfect Season", McCarver creates an indispensible companion to the year. He breaks down each of the season's major accomplishments in separate chapters and writes each like a little kid excitedly spouting everything he could think of about what he saw. This approach works quite well for the nature of the material. Obviously a great deal of time is spent on the spectacular home run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa (in which both broke Maris' record and continued their mano-a-mano battle until the final weekend) and the unbelievable season in which the New York Yankees won 114 regular season games (and 125 overall) on their way to another World Championship. There are some other fascinating topics covered, like the emergence of Cubs rookie pitcher Kerry Wood with his 20-strikeout game, David Wells' perfect game, and the resurgence of the Chicago Cubs, who made the playoffs for the first time in 9 seasons. Additionally, there are some lesser known details of the season that McCarver brings to light, such as Houston's Craig Biggio becoming the first player since Tris Speaker to have 50 doubles and 50 steals in the same season, and Giants' Jeff Kent becoming the first second baseman since the legendary Rogers Hornsby to have 120 Rbi's in back-to-back seasons. McCarver covers all the bases with vivid clarity. This book is a quick read and worthy recap of "The Perfect Season".

  • The 1998 baseball season was, indeed, a memorable one, and Tim McCarver does a good job of reviewing it. The McGuire/Sosa home run battle made it especially so, and their respect for each other and the game added to it. Tim gives his opinions and analysis of events of the season which add to the book's interest. Brief chapters are devoted to such players as Dan Quisenberry and Eric Davis. The Yankees show what it takes to make a winning team by their ability to win in whatever way the other team makes available to them. The book was easy to read and I found it interesting, but I certainly wouldn't call it a classic by any means.

  • It seems like I had read somewhere that this was a very behind-the-scenes, coaching intensive book. While there are some copies of practice schedules and some discussion of coaching decisions, the book does more reminiscing than anything else. Practice schedules are incomplete and lack explanation. About the only thing I could infer from the schedules was that UT must do their most opponent intensive practices on Wednesdays, as Wednesday schedules are never included for conference opponents. There is an overview type discussion of game plans for most opponents, which was pretty cool.
    The reminiscing is not only tolerable for non-UT fans; it is also understandable. This was a great team that played a great season. I think most people forget that the '98 Vols won on a last second field goal (Syracuse), in overtime (Florida), and by taking advantage of a late turnover (Arkansas).
    The books strength is the humanization of the UT coaches and players. While it is very easy to know the personalities on your favorite team, rivals are often dehumanized. Players in a top-notch program, like UT's, can seem like machines in uniform. Coach Fulmer does a good job reminding us that college football players are young men.
    'A Perfect Season' has a conversational style that lends itself to fast reading. 'Fat Face' Fulmer isn't smart enough to write a book that's hard to read, so even Alabama fans should be able to make it all the way through. Ole Miss fans might want to keep a dictionary handy.

  • The 1998 baseball season was so good that we have yet to fully appreciate it. That's why this book is so important -- in a vivid, exciting way we re-live that special season and come to fully appreciate it. Last year was an historic baseball season, and as time goes on this book will be even more vital as an eyewitness account by baseball's most perceptive broadcaster. After saying all that, the book was just a lot of fun and a good read.