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by Stephen J Dubner

ePub Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper download
Author:
Stephen J Dubner
ISBN13:
978-0061132988
ISBN:
0061132985
Language:
Publisher:
Harper Perennial (July 3, 2007)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biographies
ePub file:
1539 kb
Fb2 file:
1740 kb
Other formats:
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
426

As a boy, Stephen J. Dubner's hero was Franco Harris, the famed and mysterious running back for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Though they never met, it was Franco Harris who shepherded Dubner through a fatherless boyhood.

As a boy, Stephen J. When Dubner's father died, he became obsessed-he dreamed of his hero every night; he signed his school papers Franco Dubner. Years later, Dubner journeys to meet his hero, certain that Harris will embrace him. And he i. . When Dubner's father died, he became obsessed-he dreamed of his hero every night; he signed his school papers "Franco Dubner.

But it's impossible to get through even a chapter of Confessions of a Hero Worshipper, by Stephen J. Dubner, without stepping back taking a longer look at our own trajectories. In fact, the book, which details a psychic journey of mythic proportions conducted by shuttle between New York and Pittsburgh, is nothing but a long look back at the childhood of the author, carefree until his father's unexpected death at 57 years of age.

Stephen J. Dubner has returned with Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper, a true story that reads like the wisest of novels

Stephen J. Dubner has returned with Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper, a true story that reads like the wisest of novels. Summary, et. "When he was a boy, Dubner developed a fierce attachment to a football player, Franco Harris, the famed and mysterious running back for the Pittsburgh Steelers. When Dubner's father died, this attachment became an obsession

Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper'. By Stephen J. Dubner. But my hero was a football player. This was plainly a heresy, and I therefore never as much as mentioned the Dream to anyone.

Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper'. Still, I depended on it. Every night I looked forward to bedtime - which may say less about the Dream than about the unmoored, keening state of my childhood. It wasn't a miserable childhood, only one with a chunk blown out of its center, that chunk being my father. I had returned to the site of this visitation because I had come to believe that it was my hero who had kept me from crumbling into that hollow center

Stephen Joseph Dubner (born August 26, 1963) is an award-winning author, journalist, and podcast and radio host

Stephen Joseph Dubner (born August 26, 1963) is an award-winning author, journalist, and podcast and radio host. He is co-author of the popular Freakonomics book series and host of Freakonomics Radio, which gets 15 million global monthly downloads and is heard by millions more on public radio stations throughout the United States

is primarily a psychological memoir, with Dubner unraveling his life and playing it off against Harris and all that the athlete represented to him. His father died when Dubner was 13, just when the man had emerged from a long depression and had shone brightly for a few years, his death stealing away the fatherly spark that Dubner still needed ( Take me, lead me, teach me, protect me, give me permission ). Harris seemed the perfect surrogate. He was owned by no one and He thought for himself, upended expectations, bowed to no pressure other than those he generated.

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As a boy, Stephen J. Dubner's hero was Franco Harris, the famed and mysterious running back for the Pittsburgh Steelers. When Dubner's father died, he became obsessed—he dreamed of his hero every night; he signed his school papers "Franco Dubner." Though they never met, it was Franco Harris who shepherded Dubner through a fatherless boyhood. Years later, Dubner journeys to meet his hero, certain that Harris will embrace him. And he is . . . well, wrong.

Told with the grit of a journalist and the grace of a memoirist, Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper is a breathtaking, heartbreaking, and often humorous story of astonishing developments. It is also a sparkling meditation on the nature of hero worship—which, like religion and love, tells us as much about ourselves as about the object of our desire.

  • It's easy to get caught up in the little details of our lives, getting kids off to school, getting the car (or dog) fixed, paying the mortgage, raking the leaves, and doing the thousand other things that we do, so much that we forget or never get the big picture.

    But it's impossible to get through even a chapter of Confessions of a Hero Worshipper, by Stephen J. Dubner, without stepping back taking a longer look at our own trajectories.

    In fact, the book, which details a psychic journey of mythic proportions conducted by shuttle between New York and Pittsburgh, is nothing but a long look back at the childhood of the author, carefree until his father's unexpected death at 57 years of age. Dubner proceeded to do what any 10 year old kid would have done, set about to replace that figure, and he promptly selected a football player, Franco Harris of the Pittsburgh Steelers, who in very unlikely fashion proceeded to fill the gap in a profound way. For a time Dubner signed his school work, "Franco Dubner."

    Dubner grew up, went off to college, got a job and pretty much forgot Franco, until a chance sighting of the former football star on a magazine cover ignited a fool's errand, for the author to actually meet his childhood hero and establish a connection.

    In the process Dubner is forced to re-examine the loss of his father, look long and hard at how he filled that void and, more importantly, take stock of the remaining sense of loss and sorrow.

    In reading the book, I found it impossible not to examine such holes in my past, as well.

    I'm currently reading "Turbulent Souls," another book by Dubner, which details the strange spiritual and cultural journey taken by his parents, which led them from a life as Jews in New York City to life as committed Catholics on a farm in rural Upstate New York. That's where they all were when I came to know them during my year in Duanesburg as the 13 year shortstop of the local sandlot baseball team.

  • Dubnar takes me back to those years of my childhood when I cared more about Earl Campbell's stats than my family or my school work. I couldn't help but thinking as I read about the adult Dubnar's still relentless quest to bond with Franco, that the guy is a bit of a creeper. Don't think I'd like him as a neighbor, but he wrote a profound book here. Funny how the bond he tried to force with Franco came so easily with Franco's Mom. I had no problem finishing this one.

  • How could I not love this book? I was born in Pittsburgh, grew up watching the Steelers, and, like the author, lost my father when I was still in grade school.

    However, Dubner doesn't get the Pittsburgh mindset, despite mining the Steelers story for years (as the articles in the P.S. demonstrate). Pittsburghers do not suffer from an inferiority complex as Dubner asserts. Perhaps living in New York has made him equate not being full of oneself with an inferiority complex. Like most Pittsburghers I know, Franco Harris is open, friendly, down-to-earth, hardworking but a little offbeat and not the least bit full of himself. Perhaps we like Franco not only because of the immaculate reception, but also because he is just like us.

  • I've met Stephen Dubner - he's an incredible human being. He seems to be one of those people that just "gets it". After hearing him speak at my university I decided to borrow all his books from the Library. I read about 2 books a year for pleasure, and when I read I am generally bored out of my mind. That being said, I opened to page 1 of Confessions and didn't stop reading until I finished (except to use the bathroom). It doesn't even matter what Dubner is writing about - his writing style is so effective that you won't be able to stop. He essentially wrote two memoirs about his family life and if you were to read the cliff notes you'd find him to have a relatively normal life - and yet, I found myself dying to get to the next page, next sentence, next word. This guy is a genius writer. The thing I really appreciated about Confessions (and Turbulent Souls) is how honest he is. There are many anecdotes that few people would be comfortable revealing and Stephen is man enough to do so throughout. This book is great insight into the psyche of a hero-worshipper - and should be read by every American - since we so thoroughly worship our "heros". Get this book, you will not be disappointed.

  • I too worshipped a sports God in my youth-in my case, it was Bobby Orr of the Boston Bruins. Thus, I could relate to Dubner's moving tribute to his hero, Franco Harris. I know what it is like to be a teenager and to think that this person really would be your good friend if only they knew you.
    Dubner takes one small aspect of American society shared by many people-the worship of a sports hero at a young age-and explores it. He meets Harris as an adult and decides to write a book on him. Only the experience doesn't turn out to be the dream of a lifetime. In many ways, it is more of a nightmare.
    The reader feels for both the author and Harris. Franco Harris clearly is an athlete who has moved on with his life, much to his credit. At times, the author seemed to almost stalk him. Yet you feel for the author also. No one should lose the image of a hero at any stage in his or her life.
    I would recommend this book for sports lovers of all ages and both genders. If you're not into sports, then this would be a more challenging read. Yet most people have heroes in their youth in many arenas (sports, history, politics), so in that sense, the book's theme is universal.