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ePub Beating About the Bushes download

by Tim Sommer

ePub Beating About the Bushes download
Author:
Tim Sommer
ISBN13:
978-0741449818
ISBN:
0741449811
Language:
Publisher:
Infinity Publishing (March 17, 2014)
Category:
Subcategory:
Biographies
ePub file:
1837 kb
Fb2 file:
1825 kb
Other formats:
rtf lit mbr docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
459

Beating about the Bushes book.

Beating about the Bushes book. Beating About the Bushes allows the reader to ride the emotional. Sommer gives an inside look to life on the road with the minor leagues during a time that it was definitely more about loving the game then making money though he stood up for himself to increase his pay. You also hear the stories during the 60’s of the civil rights movement and how that affected the minor leagues when they did have black players who could not do the same things as the white players. He addresses some of the drug and alcohol issues too, without being sensational.

Beating About the Bushes allows the reader to ride the emotional wave of my eight year professional career starting with the realization at age 12, I was the "big fish in the small . Additional Product Features. Black & White Illustrations.

Beating About the Bushes allows the reader to ride the emotional wave of my eight year professional career starting with the realization at age 12, I was the "big fish in the small pond". See all 4 brand new listings.

Sommer, Tim. Varying Form of Title: Minor league baseball in the '60's. Download book Beating around the bushes, Tim Sommer. Publication, Distribution, et. West Conshohocken, PA. Infinity, (c)2008. Physical Description: 264 p. ;, 22 cm. General Note: "My 8 year professional career" Cover.

beat around the bush Also beat about the bush beat the bushes American to try very hard to get or achieve something .

beat around the bush Also beat about the bush. Approach indirectly, in a roundabout way, or too cautiously. For example, Stop beating around the bush-get to the point. beat the bushes American to try very hard to get or achieve something She's not out there beating the bushes for a job - she's just as happy not working. The North American origin of "beat the bushes," which Oxford and Cambridge agree on, doesn't jibe with the 1400s first occurrence date that Ammer claims in The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms.

also {v. ph., {informal}To try very hard to find or get something Contrast: BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH or BEATAROUND THE BUSH., {informal}To try very hard to find or get something. / The mayor was beating the bushesfor funds to build the playground. Contrast: BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH or BEATAROUND THE BUSH.

they have beaten about the bush. I am beating about the bush. I am beating about the bush you are beating about the bush he/she/it is beating about the bush we are beating about the bush you are beating about the bush they are beating about the bush. we are beating about the bush.

See: BEAT ABOUT THE BUSH. 1. To crush or break the spirit of; win over; conquer. phr.,

AS TIM Henman, in the form of his life, completed a magnificent run of victories in Paris last week to lift the biggest honour of his career, I’m sure I wasn’t the only member of a grateful nation asking: What the hell is that?

AS TIM Henman, in the form of his life, completed a magnificent run of victories in Paris last week to lift the biggest honour of his career, I’m sure I wasn’t the only member of a grateful nation asking: What the hell is that? At this long-awaited, richly earned moment of triumph, and with Andy Roddick, Roger Federer, Gustavo Kuerten and Sébastien Grosjean coughing in his dust, the British No 1 stepped up to receive from the tournament organisers. well, steady inspection revealed it to be a wrought-iron bush. You could see the momentary confusion in Henman’s face.

Tim Sommer is a vaguely legendary avant-pop musician, record producer, former Atlantic Records A&R executive .

Tim Sommer is a vaguely legendary avant-pop musician, record producer, former Atlantic Records A&R executive, and writer. com. y-days. rockandrollglobe. Remembering the Glory Days of MTV News - Rock and Roll Globe.

Beating About the Bushes allows the reader to ride the emotional wave of my eight year professional career starting with the realization at age 12, I was the "big fish in the small pond. Infinity Publishing (PA).

Beating About the Bushes allows the reader to ride the emotional wave of my eight year professional career starting with the realization at age 12, I was the big fish in the small pond .
  • Nowadays, the life of a major league baseball player is closer to something out of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" than the harsh reality of trying to make ends meet for the vast majority of working class people. If you happened to be toiling in baseball's proving grounds - the minor leagues - over 40 years ago, you knew what it was like to struggle through each season; life was anything but glamorous for those at the lower echelon of baseball's professional existence.

    Even though the money earned was "peanuts" compared to the multi-million dollar contracts doled out to the profession's elite players in the 21st century, the memories are often quite rich, and make for a fascinating perspective, which the author of this book - Tim Sommer - has provided for us.

    Sommer was a skinny kid who defied all odds by even getting a professional baseball contract to begin with; growing up in small town Ohio, attending a high school that didn't even have a baseball program to offer; yet he did possess a blazing fast-ball and a dogged determination to succeed at his craft; enduring eight long years "beating about the bushes" hoping for a shot at the fame and (modest) fortune of being a bonafide major leaguer. You've really got to love the game to endure that type of existence. You've also got to possess a great deal of talent to keep that dream alive for the better part of a decade; and Sommer did.

    Sommer experienced much while pursuing his dream; growing up in a dysfunctional family - his mother was chronically mentally ill while his father offered little guidance or support for his son; instead spending much of his time and energy trying to escape the reality that was confronting him; throwing himself into his insurance sales occupation as a way to endure the drudgery of a highly dysfunctional domestic existence.

    Meanwhile, as young Tim grew up, he soon established himself as the best pitcher in town, with a 90 mph fastball, terrific control and a lot of confidence. This is a guy who knew he wanted to be a professional ballplayer at a tender age, and made his dream a reality by perhaps being the skinniest kid alive to coax a pro contract from the Baltimore Orioles. His first order of business was quickly mandated by the team's front office - gain lots of weight; lots and lots of weight! Sommer never really fattened up all that much, but he performed his duties on the mound with the skill of a big man, fooling everyone with his great heater on a regular basis.

    As Sommer recounts the highlights of his minor league career, his path often crosses those who would go on to become stars in the big leagues; including a hilarious encounter with Reggie Jackson when he was just getting started in professional ball as a highly touted "bonus baby". When Jackson had the temerity to hit a long home run against Sommer's sqaud, the day before Tim was to take the mound, he's ordered by his goofy manager to immediately plunk Jackson with a pitch the first time he steps into the batter's box. A reluctant Sommer complies, but not until his catcher tips Jackson off about the plan of action. As Sommer's winding up to deliver the intended shot to the buttocks of the future Mr October, Reggie gets a little nervous and tries to bail out of harm's way; Tim then has to figure out a way to accomplish his mission with a moving target; he's successful, plunking Jackson on the backside with a medium speed fastball that was probably ten feet inside. Jackson then "charges" the mound, while Sommer hilariously engages in a mock brawl that has the participants rolling around in front of the mound, giggling like a couple of school children. Now that's my kind of brawl.

    Sommer's got a million stories, and each one seems to be more engaging than the previous one. In the end, you'll be glad you tagged along for the ride; although his dream of becoming a big league pitcher went mysteriously unfulfiled, I don't think Sommer would've traded his eight years "in the bushes" for anything.

    His story is entertaing and amusing, as well as poignant. More than anything else, Sommer teaches us to roll with life's punches; always give it your best shot, and don't feel sorry for yourself if things don't go the way you'd hoped. This is a great lesson for anyone to learn, no matter what level of success you may have already achieved.

  • This book is not only about a minor league career, but brings to life such people as Cal Ripken Sr, Darrell Johnson, Fred Kendall and Seve Dalkowski. The book is interesting from the first page as Tim Sommer recalls some hard times as a youngster and how baseball helped him escape from this. Sommer recalls such things minor league bus rides, cheap hotels, low pay and what players did in their spare time. The book is never boring and hard to put down.

  • Very entertaining book about the minor leagues. I got the author to autograph it for me.

  • True story, as told by the author, who now works in Prescott Valley, AZ

  • I come from a family that loves baseball. Our extended family would always play baseball when we got together at my grandparent's farm for Easter, Mother's Day and other holidays. All 18 grandchildren played and most of their 8 children and we loved it. I also grew up outside Baltimore and so my team was always the Orioles. We joined the Junior Orioles and went to many games. If not there we would watch the games on tv when they were on but mostly listened to Chuck Thompson's play by play on the radio. I also have gone to quite a few minor league games in the Orioles farm system: Frederick Keys and DelMarVa Shore Birds.

    That is why I couldn't wait to read Tim Sommer's book about his 8 year professional career with the Baltimore Orioles organization. I was not disappointed. He gives many details in his time as a pitcher from 1963 through 1970. He rubbed shoulders with many great Orioles who I grew up watching such as Jim Palmer, who he would have pitching contests to see who threw faster, Cal Ripken, Sr., who was his manager and took a real interest in his players, Frank Robinson and Earl Weaver who would work hard to get the players that would work best on his team.

    There were other Oriole players, not as famous to those outside Baltimore but who I remembered such as Curt Blefary and Don Baylor. Hearing stories about some of your childhood heroes was fun and sometimes disappointing as you heard some not so flattering stories.

    Sommer gives an inside look to life on the road with the minor leagues during a time that it was definitely more about loving the game then making money though he stood up for himself to increase his pay. You also hear the stories during the 60's of the civil rights movement and how that affected the minor leagues when they did have black players who could not do the same things as the white players. He addresses some of the drug and alcohol issues too, without being sensational.

    The book is divided into short chapters and is an easy read though several times I wanted the transitions to be smoother. Sommer is a good storyteller and whether you know the players or not you will enjoy learning about them. If you like stories and especially if you are sports lover you will enjoy this book.