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ePub Killers in Africa: The Truth about Animals Lying in Wait and Hunters Lying in Print (Resnick Library of African Adventure) download

by Alexander Lake,Mike Resnick

ePub Killers in Africa: The Truth about Animals Lying in Wait and Hunters Lying in Print (Resnick Library of African Adventure) download
Author:
Alexander Lake,Mike Resnick
ISBN13:
978-1570901164
ISBN:
1570901163
Language:
Publisher:
Alexander Books; 2 edition (November 1, 2000)
Category:
Subcategory:
Hunting & Fishing
ePub file:
1799 kb
Fb2 file:
1156 kb
Other formats:
lrf rtf mbr mobi
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
412

Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference. The book is a reprint done in 1995. There is an interesting story behind Mike Resnick deciding to have this book put back into print.

Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference. At a time - the late 1940s and early 1950s - when hunters were selling macho yarns filled to overflowing with false bravado. I highly recommend it and also reading about Lake's father, who was an interesting fellow himself. After finishing the book I was loaned I knew I had to see if I could find a copy for my personal library. I can tell it's a grand book to pull out on a lazy Sunday to savor with a glass of Jameson. I'm going to see if his daughter will have it released as an ebook.

Killers in Africa book. Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference

Killers in Africa book. Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference  . At a time - the late 1940s and early 1950s - when hunters were selling macho yarns filled to overflowing with false bravado, Lake began debunking all the myths that had been making the rounds. Indeed, when Killers in Africa was first published, the advertising tagline was The truth about animals lying Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference.

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View on timesmachine. THE objection to the majority of the books on hunting is that they are compiled by hunters rather than writers

Alexander Lake, Mike Resnick. Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference

Alexander Lake, Mike Resnick.

Series: Resnick's Library of African Adventure (1.

Series: Resnick's Library of African Adventure (1). Members. Indeed, when Killers in Africa was first published, the advertising tagline was The truth about animals lying in wait and hunters lying in print This book, drawn from a number of Lake's magazine articles written while in Africa, covers the animals he hunted, species by species, all told with a round the campfire feel.

I kept wondering why you needed to a rifle that could shoot so flat but I have been reading Killers in Africa: The Truth about Animals Lying in Wait and Hunters Lying in Print by White Hunter Alexander Lake

I kept wondering why you needed to a rifle that could shoot so flat but I have been reading Killers in Africa: The Truth about Animals Lying in Wait and Hunters Lying in Print by White Hunter Alexander Lake. It is a great book by the way. But in it he talks about how initially, he couldn't get any closer to them than 800 yards no matter how stealthy he was. He was nearly killed several times by Chacma Baboons, and had his arm ripped open by one. Now I get why they are grenerally free trophy fees on safari. They might be one of the few species that stalking close really requires a special.

Book by Lake, Alexander. Publisher:Alexander Books.

I recently moved THE RESNICK LIBRARY OF AFRICAN ADVENTURE from St. .St. Martin's also publishes Peter Capstick's LIBRARY OF AFRICAN HUNTING, a series of classic reprints. Martin's Press over to Alexander Books, an offshoot of WorldComm Press. The primary reason was to bring Lake back into print. Well, sometimes it's not quite that easy.

Published November 2000 by Alexander Books.

Alexander Lake was a big game hunter, but a hunter with a difference. At a time -- the late 1940s and early 1950s -- when hunters were selling macho yarns filled to overflowing with false bravado, Lake began debunking all the myths that had been making the rounds. Indeed, when Killers in Africa was first published, the advertising tagline was The truth about animals lying in wait and hunters lying in print! This book, drawn from a number of Lake's magazine articles written while in Africa, covers the animals he hunted, species by species, all told with a round the campfire feel.
  • This guy did very little hunting. His books are fully of fantasies. He has no idea about firearms and ballistics. It is one of the worst examples of african hunting literature i have come across.

  • A fascinating book with many insights on survival in a very hostile and dangerous environment.

  • I've read a number of African hunting and adventure classics including titles by F.C. Selous, Carl Akley and others. Alexander Lake was a comparative late-comer to Africa (early 20th century) but his respect and love for the people and wildlife he writes about are evident. His writing style is authentic, without varnish or too much introspection. The sense you get from this book is that Lake was a man of action who started out as a pragmatist wanting to make some money out of his adventure, but ended up being fundamentally and unexpectedly changed by Africa. The book is filled with fascinating anecdotes of a wild African world which no longer exists. Those of you who enjoyed Isak Dinesen's Out of Africa will find this book equally authentic and personal but less sophisticated in tone. This is a great read that will leave you with a vivd sense of place and time, and a feeling for what Alexander Lake and the Africa of his day were like. If you are an African hunting/adventure buff, you will enjoy this read a great deal.

  • My all time favorite hunting book! I enjoy reading this book a lot.

    It takes me on an adventure that is like every boy's dream.

    I want to go to Africa because of this book.

    Obviously, It's a 5 star from me.

  • I first read this book while in grade school during the late fifties . I was captivated by it and continued to borrow it from my local library until it became so shabby that the library discarded it ( much to my chagrin ) without replacing it . I have since found a replacement . I have enjoyed the read as much now as then.
    While Lake will never go down in literary history as an immortal bard , he has an easy to read style that makes one feel like one is sitting with him by a campfire after a long day's trek , listening to the tales of a man who spent much time in the African bush hunting the animals there in a time long past .
    Each chapter focuses on a different species ( or two ) . Lake then proceeds to give his memoirs on each species and tells of their habits and of his encounters with them.
    I don't really care that some of his stories are a bit far fetched or that they may be proved wrong by contemporary research ( a mamba that can run down a horse ???) I just simply enjoyed this book for what it is. It is a fun and very entertaining read .
    So pull up a rock by the campfire while Mr. Lake cleans his Lee Enfield .303 and drift away to a time never to return and enjoy a few well spun yarns about big and small game hunting in Africa when it really was the Dark Continent .

  • I don't know who this GreyBeard idiot is but he is full of elephant dung when it comes to telling the truth about the book "Killers in Africa". It has to be one of the best books I've ever read. I enjoy re-reading the stories over and over. It is obvious the the above mentioned buffoon is jealous and would not know the truth about reviewing any exceptional literary works such as this. Buy "Killers
    in Africa" and you will never regret it. As for Greybeard if that is a real name, I would be happy to meet you in person and repeat these words to your face for you have done Alexander Lake an injustice. Your review is not even close to being realistic. It is no sin to be stupid Greybeard, but after reading your comments I think you may be abusing the privilege.

  • Lakes writing style is simple and direct. Do the stories sound punched up a bit? I'm really not sure, since the nature of big game hunting was over the top it naturally follows his stories of those adventures would sound that way to the reader, tucked safely in his home . He is as candid about his mistakes as he is about his wins. I read another reviewer taking cause with Lakes knowledge of firearms. As someone who personally knows about firearms I have to conclude that reviewer knows next to nothing about them. The book is a reprint done in 1995. There is an interesting story behind Mike Resnick deciding to have this book put back into print. I highly recommend it and also reading about Lake's father, who was an interesting fellow himself. After finishing the book I was loaned I knew I had to see if I could find a copy for my personal library. I can tell it's a grand book to pull out on a lazy Sunday to savor with a glass of Jameson. I'm going to see if his daughter will have it released as an ebook. Really, I can't recommend this book enough to any reader with a fascination for the period of the Great White Hunter.

  • Certainly one of the best books on African hunting I have ever come across (and I have read many). His stories are always interesting, often exciting, with a good sense of humour, occasionally touching or thought-provoking, in any case good, solid entertainment. Lake was a humble writer (perhaps in line with J.A. Hunter and T. Murray-Smith), which adds credence to his words. With the experience of more than 20 hunting trips to Africa: I believe everything he wrote. Lake may not be the greatest gun writer, but he, as the vast majority of his contemporaries in Africa, had no means to afford an artillery-calibre big bore double rifle, and he simply did not need it.