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ePub Feet of the Chameleon: The Story of Football in Africa download

by Ian Hawkey

ePub Feet of the Chameleon: The Story of Football in Africa download
Author:
Ian Hawkey
ISBN13:
978-1906032852
ISBN:
1906032858
Language:
Publisher:
Anova Books (May 1, 2010)
Category:
Subcategory:
Miscellaneous
ePub file:
1862 kb
Fb2 file:
1116 kb
Other formats:
lrf mobi txt docx
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
236

is a recognized authority on African Football. This is an intelligent and insightful work. It goes location by location telling the story of some of the most important football areas in Africa - from Algeria in the North to South Africa in the south

is a recognized authority on African Football. Ian Hawkey is a soccer journalist for the Sunday Times. It goes location by location telling the story of some of the most important football areas in Africa - from Algeria in the North to South Africa in the south. It does a great job with the old and the modern. This author knows his stuff and has interviewed numerous significant sources. If you are interested in African football and learning more, this is the book to read. Football woven with history, culture, politics and so much more.

Feet of the Chameleon book. Hawkey also manages to avoid being either condescending or patronizing to African football. Indeed, his tone remains practically neutral throughout something that might seem as a recipe for a boring read but in reality is anything but: Feet of the Chameleon is an enthralling read. Here, finally, is a book that does African football justice. If you get to read only one book this year, then this has to be i. .

Inevitably, football in Africa becomes entwined with politics. As anyone travelling in Africa quickly discovers, most of the games that matter are beamed in from London, Liverpool and Paris. Several of the post-colonial nationalist leaders understood its potency, even overseeing their own favoured teams. Later on, Bobby Moore and four of his World Cup winning team-mates endorsed apartheid by accepting lucrative deals to play in South Africa. Indeed, for much of this engaging book Hawkey is reminiscent of a schoolboy footballer, displaying huge enthusiasm but zipping around the field a little too much. And this is the biggest challenge facing the sport in Africa.

Feet of the Chameleon: The Story of African Football. Feet of the Chameleon - Ian Hawkey

Feet of the Chameleon: The Story of African Football. Feet of the Chameleon - Ian Hawkey. More great titles from. Praise for Feet of the Chameleon. For those familiar with Ian Hawkey’s clever, witty and authoritative football writing in the Sunday Times, this book is a feast. He gives African football the full treatment. History blends effortlessly with anecdote and Hawkey’s wry observation is never far - glory be! - from the surface. From the Med to the Cape, the African game is lavishly yet page-turningly covered.

This fascinating history traces the development of soccer in Africa and investigates what makes African football unique.

In June 2010, Africa will host the World Cup, the most significant global sporting spectacle ever to take place on the continent. South Africa's successful bid was in many ways unsurprising: soccer thrives in every country in Africa, and is a vitally important aspect of communities. This fascinating history traces the development of soccer in Africa and investigates what makes African football unique.

Reading ‘Feet of the Chameleon’, you start to wonder why there are not more books about African football

Reading ‘Feet of the Chameleon’, you start to wonder why there are not more books about African football. There are stories, personalities and incidents just jumping out of the pages and as comprehensive and fascinating as it all is, you are left wanting more.

South Africa's successful bid was in many ways unsurprising: soccer thrives in every country in Africa, and is a.Drawing on a wide range of sources, it also examines how the game fits into the social and political life of the continent.

South Africa's successful bid was in many ways unsurprising: soccer thrives in every country in Africa, and is a vitally important aspect of communities. Download from free file storage

Winner of the Best Football Book at the British Sports Book Awards and shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of The Year 2009.

Winner of the Best Football Book at the British Sports Book Awards and shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of The Year 2009. Written with warmth and understanding, the book for which African football has been crying ou. Featuring a new foreword by the author, Feet of the Chameleon has been newly released in digital format to coincide with 29th African Cup of Nations in January 2013

Their primary interest will be watching men try to kick a ball into a goal, but the matches are only part of the story. 2. per cent of the labour force. In his book Feet of the Chameleon, Ian Hawkey opens with a wonderful

Their primary interest will be watching men try to kick a ball into a goal, but the matches are only part of the story. A World Cup costs billions to stage, as does an Olympics; and if you consider how much debate there has been in Britain over the burden of the 2012 London Games, imagine how much angst the initial outlay of £. billion on a football tournament has caused in a country where unemployment was recently revealed at . million people, or.

In June 2010, Africa will host the World Cup, the most significant global sporting spectacle ever to take place on the continent. South Africa's successful bid was in many ways unsurprising: soccer thrives in every country in Africa, and is a vitally important aspect of communities. This fascinating history traces the development of soccer in Africa and investigates what makes African soccer unique. Drawing on a wide range of sources, it also examines how the game fits into the social and political life of the continent.

  • What a great book! Thoroughly enjoyed every page! It goes location by location telling the story of some of the most important football areas in Africa - from Algeria in the North to South Africa in the south.

    It does a great job with the old and the modern. This author knows his stuff and has interviewed numerous significant sources.

    If you are interested in African football and learning more, this is the book to read. Football woven with history, culture, politics and so much more.

    I only wish there were more football books like this.

  • Thoroughly enjoyable. Certain to enlighten readers on the intricacies of African football.

  • [This book was sent to me for review, and the review copy contains no photographs, a point I criticise. I have learned from another reader of the book that this omission has been corrected, and this reader also claims that the print is of a reasonable size in his copy, although I am unable to verify this. I should say this in fairness, but any potential purchasers ought to satisfy themselves that the book they are buying is not in the shape it was when I got it for review.]

    There's a book in here somewhere, except that between them the author and the publishers have done a very effective job of smothering it. This is a great pity, because Ian Hawkey is a respected and knowledgeable authority on football (American readers please read 'soccer' passim) and he writes well. There is any amount of valuable information and insightful commentary here, Hawkey's love of the sport is patent, nostalgia specialists will find much to their heart's desire, and of course the topic is becoming - how can one put it - more, er, topical with the next World Cup scheduled to be held in South Africa in 2010.

    The first glance is daunting. What you will find is 300-odd pages of smallish print and nary a photo plate from start to finish. What were they all thinking? What sort of public did they expect the book to appeal to? The nostalgia public will certainly love some of the descriptions of games of yore, but the nostalgic population crave photographic reminders. If they want to relive such-and-such a match or part of a match they are going to have a job finding the bit they want, or they are just going to have to settle down to the task of reading the book from start to finish, which is what I did. They may get some help from the chapter headings, but these are 'literary' and stylish rather than plain index-headings. Also, the narrative is only very roughly chronological, so that is only an approximate guide too.

    If more common sense had been shown in the presentation I might not have felt so strongly that the book is overloaded with detail, but I think I would have thought that to a certain extent even if the layout had been brilliant. The total effect, with the crowded pages of small lettering and the rather rambling narrative, is oddly suggestive of muttering in print. The narration suffers, I think, from lack of a clear idea what it is all about. I tried to discern a theme to each chapter from the chapter's title, and you may have more success with that than I had, but I couldn't shake off the impression that the author went in pursuit of every hare he started, whatever the supposed theme was. There are accounts of matches and incidents within matches, and there are admiring profiles of certain players, particularly Roger Milla but also more recent superstars like Eto'o. Sometimes the focus is strictly on the game, at other times it is political, and understandably so when the Algerian war of independence and the end of apartheid in South Africa come up in the frame. The various tales are all very well told, and in particular the story of the air crash that wiped out the Zambian team is riveting. There is a thoughtful Epilogue that says good things too, but this epilogue has the impossible challenge of summarising what there is no way of summarising.

    The best way of reading this book may be to take it a chapter at a time, not necessarily in the author's sequence but just as your own fancy takes you. It is all good quality stuff, I certainly do not wish to dispute. Read solemnly from start to finish, the way I read it, the book is heavier going than I feel it ought to be. What it really needs is fairly drastic pruning and rewriting. Short of that, please reprint it in a decent typeface and sling in a few photographs. Please.

  • This is cultural geography at its best. I read it in a few sittings. A great geo-political narrative told through the great game of football.
    Well done Ian Hawkey.