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by Karin Fossum

ePub Don't Look Back download
Author:
Karin Fossum
ISBN13:
978-0099452133
ISBN:
0099452138
Language:
Publisher:
Vintage; New Ed edition (2003)
Category:
Subcategory:
Mystery
ePub file:
1195 kb
Fb2 file:
1470 kb
Other formats:
lrf lrf azw rtf
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
802

Translated from the norwegian by. Felicity David.

Translated from the norwegian by. This electronic book is sold subject to the condition that it shall not by way of trade or otherwise, be lent, resold, hired out, or otherwise circulated without the publisher's prior consent in any form other than that in which it is published and without a similar condition including this condition being imposed on the subsequent purchaser.

Fortunately, I quite liked Don't Look Back. In fact, I can probably say I loved it. I mean, was I eager to dive back into the book whenever I had a free moment? I was. Did I feel affection toward the main characters?

Fortunately, I quite liked Don't Look Back. Did I feel affection toward the main characters?

Ships from and sold by Prominent Books. Fortunately, I quite liked Don't Look Back. Did I feel affection toward the main characters?

The first book in the Inspector Konrad Sejer series, 2002. Translated From The Norwegian By Felicity David. Originally published with the title Se Deg ikke Tilbake! By J. W. Cappelens Forlag, Oslo

The first book in the Inspector Konrad Sejer series, 2002. Cappelens Forlag, Oslo. Even though some place names have been changed, the setting for this story will be recognizable to those who live there. CHAPTER 1. Ragnhild opened the door cautiously and peered out.

Don't Look Back book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Meet Inspector Sejer: smart and enigmatic, tough but fair.

Critically acclaimed across Europe, Karin Fossum's novels evoke a world that is terrifyingly familiar

Beneath the imposing Kollen Mountain lies a small village where the children run in and out of one another's houses and play unafraid in the streets. But the sleepy village is like a pond through which not enough water runs – beneath the surface it is beginning to stagnate. When a naked body is found by the lake at the top of the mountain, its seeming tranquility is disturbed forever. Critically acclaimed across Europe, Karin Fossum's novels evoke a world that is terrifyingly familiar. Don't Look Back introduces the tough, ethical Inspector Sejer to British readers for the first time.

Don't Look Back (Norwegian: Se deg ikke tilbake!, 1996) is a novel by Norwegian writer Karin Fossum, the second to feature Inspector Konrad Sejer. The novel is the first book of Fossum which was translated into English. It won the Glass Key Award in 1997. It was filmed in 2007 as La ragazza del lago (aka The Girl by the Lake). The body of a local teenage girl named Annie was found by an idyllic pond in the woods. The suspect list grows indefinitely.

DON’T LOOK BACK, KARIN FOSSUM, 2002 The .

DON’T LOOK BACK, KARIN FOSSUM, 2002 The Norwegian crime scene Norway 4,858,199 people (2010) Area of 324,220 sq km (125,182 sq mi.

Author: Karin Fossum. Beneath the imposing Kollen Mountain lies a small village where the children run in and out of one another’s houses and play unafraid in the streets. Critically acclaimed across Europe, Karin Fossum’s novels evoke a world that is terrifyingly familiar.

Don't Look Back - Karin Fossum. That didn’t look good, so she let go with one hand and put the doll back in place, patted down the blanket, and continued on her way. She was wearing sneakers: one was red with green laces, the other was green with red laces, and that’s how it had to be. She had on a red sweat suit with Simba the Lion across the chest and a green anorak over it.

DON T LOOK BACK
  • An imaginative and well-written detective story with sensitively described locations and characters (I especially like the way Raymond is shown to be a complex and interesting person rather than just a two-dimensional stereotype). The murderer is not too hard to guess but it's fun to follow the way Sejer figures out his whodunnit. Plenty of red herrings on the way of course.
    The beginning is a lovely play on our prejudices and preconceptions - my favourite part of the novel

    Some may dislike the abrupt switching back and forth between two simultaneous story lines without warning. I enjoyed that - it gave depth and immediacy to the plot

    The translation's great but once again substandard editing in a kindle edition, with a whole page missing at a very important stage of the plot

  • This somewhat clunky murder mystery is set in a small Norwegian village, where everyone knows everyone - or do they? The beginning is ominous: it is the classic scenario where a little girl is lured into a van by a quirky man with dubious intentions. It is up to Chief Inspector Konrad Sejer, a widower inclined to a very deliberate approach, to unravel all of the developments that ensue.

    The best part of the story are the painstaking discoveries by Sejer of the troubled relations within families connected to the murder(s). However, Sejer remains a rather tedious character; his methodical manner almost seems plodding. Except for the teenage Annie, who unfortunately meets an untimely end, none of the characters are compelling. The author does manage to create a sense of foreboding surrounding this small Norwegian community that tends to hold the reader. Nonetheless, the book suffers from a lack of pizzazz.

  • I bought this book on sale for the Kindle back when it seemed like Norwegian crime fiction was a thing. Is it still a thing? I don't know, but it was a thing, right? Anyway, I thought it was a thing and so I bought this and in retrospect a silly number of other Karin Fossum books when they were on sale, and I remember thinking, "Boy, I hope these don't suck," as I clicked through and kept buying. Click. Click. Click.

    I'm reading 52 books in 52 weeks for 2013, and I've weighted my reading list toward crime fiction and so I thought this would be a good one to work in early on: because if I liked Karin Fossum's books, I'd have something to look forward to when the next one came up on the list a month or so later. Alternately, if I didn't like, I'd have time to swap out the other books for something I would like.

    Fortunately, I quite liked Don't Look Back. In fact, I can probably say I loved it. I mean, was I eager to dive back into the book whenever I had a free moment? I was. Did I feel affection toward the main characters? I did. Did I get that delicious aching tension that happens approximately two-thirds of the way through a book you're really enjoying, where you're torn between ripping through the remaining pages because you really want to know what will happen and lingering on each page so you can stay in the world of the book? I got that. So, yeah, let's say I loved Don't Look Back and give me another month or three to figure out if I'm not just flush with the pleasure of reading a very good book or not.

    The review. Did you want the review? I guess that's what we do here, right? Give you the synopsis, the opinion, the telling detail, the almost-too-apt closing line?

    Well, even if so, I'm going to skip the synopsis and you'll thank me for it later. Let's just say a police detective and his partner are investigating a crime in a small Norwegian town. Everyone in the town knows one another, has opinions about one another in their own semi-taciturn way. As the pair investigate, the omniscient narrator moves easily from the inside of one person's head to the next with a stylistic confidence I found exciting. (Fossum has more than one chapter start inside the head of a villager and then, as soon as the policemen are on the scene, she leaps right inside their POV.)

    But once in their heads, Fossum hangs about not to plant clues for the reader but to illuminate the delicate processes of grief, loss, and shock. In a way, the book is about the reverberations left in the wake of death. A glib elevator pitch for Don't Look Back might be: it's like if Ross MacDonald had written a novelization of the Twin Peaks pilot.

    Even if that allows you to guess at the contours of the plot and perhaps a certain amount of the theme, it doesn't give Fossum her due. Her work seduces you with its understated empathy for every character in the book. Even as much as I came to enjoy the interplay between kindly Inspector Sejer and his young assistant Skarre, you feel Fossum has no more affection for them than she does for all the other characters. That seems to me to be a rarity in the field of mystery fiction, where the investigator has an MVP status among the writer or (if it becomes a series) the readers, or both.

    Although such maturity and poise is to be appreciated in its own right, it actually helps heighten the themes of Don't Look Back: because no character is too slight, no death goes unfelt...even as its aftershocks are impossible to predict. Don't Look Back is an enjoyable, touching, thoughtful read. I can't wait to get to the next.

  • This was the first book which I had read of Karin Fossum's Inspector Sejer series and for me it was a promising start. I found myself drawn to the introspective Inspector Sejer and his methods of questioning suspects and following the loose ends.

    A frantic search for a missing child is successful however the search uncovers the body of a local teenager, Annie Holland. Through questioning it is uncovered that Annie is kind, considerate, she possessed an ability to work with even the most difficult and was athletically gifted, being constantly on the run. It seems she should have been able to defend herself. I was impressed that this book developed such a sympathetic picture of the victim, something that happens rarely. The reader was infused with a sense of sorrow for her passing.

    I also appreciated getting a feeling for the setting a small village in Norway, in which neighbors are well aware of the comings and goings. It has its share of characters to make the community even more interesting.

    I look forward to reading more of this series.

  • Very enjoyable, sober Norwegian procedural. No pyrotechnics. Beautiful, athletic 15 year old Annie is found dead on a beach surrounded by woods. There are a few feasible suspects in a very small town. Not uncommonly, there are some unlikely scenes (particularly one near the end involving the boyfriend) but few books don't have those. Few lives don't have those. Definitely worth the read but not if you're looking for a rush. I was looking for an antidote to a sugar rush from a recent novel and this was perfect. Nothing loopy, as I said, quite sober. One very bad thing about the book, the very last scene. The author tries to come full circle in the last few sentences with an ominous, unlikely and unneccesary cliffhanger that falls very flat - like an off color joke in the wrong crowd. I must have looked like I sucked on a lime after reading it as my eyes rolled toward the top of my head and into my brain - in disbelief and denial, trying to make sense of her decision to end the book like that. So I read the ending again. Yop, that's what she's doing.... At least she saved the sour note for last and I would recommend Don't Look Back regardless.